Amplifying the Impact of Open Access: Wikipedia and the Diffusion of Science

Abstract: With the rise of Wikipedia as a first-stop source for scientific knowledge, it is important to compare its representation of that knowledge to that of the academic literature. This article approaches such a comparison through academic references made within the worlds 50 largest Wikipedias. Previous studies have raised concerns that Wikipedia editors may simply use the most easily accessible academic sources rather than sources of the highest academic status. We test this claim by identifying the 250 most heavily used journals in each of 26 research fields (4,721 journals, 19.4M articles in total) indexed by the Scopus database, and modeling whether topic, academic status, and accessibility make articles from these journals more or less likely to be referenced on Wikipedia. We find that, controlling for field and impact factor, the odds that an open access journal is referenced on the English Wikipedia are 47% higher compared to closed access journals. Moreover, in most of the worlds Wikipedias a journals high status (impact factor) and accessibility (open access policy) both greatly increase the probability of referencing. Among the implications of this study is that the chief effect of open access policies may be to significantly amplify the diffusion of science, through an intermediary like Wikipedia, to a broad public audience.

Funding in Open Access publishing

“You want to publish your recently written article in an Open Access journal and you found out that the journal charges you Article Processing Charges, also well known as APC. What possibilities you have to pay for your APC since publishers do NOT want you to pay the APC out of your own pocket. There are sources of funding available that authors can use to cover APC….”

Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing – OASPA

“The Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), and the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) are scholarly organizations that have seen an increase in the number, and broad range in the quality, of membership applications. Our organizations have collaborated in an effort to identify principles of transparency and best practice for scholarly publications and to clarify that these principles form part of the criteria on which membership applications will be evaluated.

These criteria are largely derived from those developed by the Directory of Open Access Journals. Note that additional membership criteria may also be used by each of the scholarly organizations. The organizations will not share information about applications received. We do not intend to develop or publish a list of publishers or journals that failed to demonstrate they met the criteria for transparency and best practice.

This is the second version of a work in progress (published June 2015); the first version was made available by OASPA in December 2013. We encourage its wide dissemination and continue to welcome feedback on the general principles and the specific criteria. Background on the organizations is below …”

Scholarly Communication Officer – UC Berkeley

“UC Berkeley Library is looking for a service-oriented Scholarly Communication Officer whose principal role will be to educate the university community about scholarly publication modes, intellectual property/copyright, and open access issues and services. S/he will be a campus resource on local, national and international scholarly communication developments and activities and their impact on scholarly inquiry and instruction….”

Copyright and Open Access Assistant (YCW Position) | Faculty of Information

“Ryerson University Library and Archives is currently seeking a Copyright and Open Access Assistant to aid with the creation of two subject specific LibGuides and well as the updating of Scholarly Communication and Copyright webpages. As well the successful candidate would expected to assist with updating transactional permissions in the University copyright database. The primary objective of this project is to create two new detailed, rich and informative LibGuides, one that focuses on Copyright and one that focuses on Scholarly Communication issues. Both will act as a core resource for information about copyright and scholarly communication at Ryerson University, and be useful for both faculty and students. These are new resources. The Copyright LibGuide will deal with issues of: instructor copyright compliance at the University including E-Reserves, student copyright information, copyright basics, fair dealing and other copyright exceptions, copyright exceptions, and copyright-free and Creative Commons resources that can be used in teaching and by students (open educational resources). The Scholarly Communication LibGuide will include an overview of Open Access, information of the Ryerson Digital Repository, the Open Access Author Fund, self-archiving strategies, predatory open access journals, basics of bibliometrics, author publishing agreements, the Tri-Council Open Access policy, open access journals (green versus gold), and an Open Access Resource reading list….”

Elsevier Cracks Down on Pirated Scientific Articles

“Academic publishing company Elsevier has filed a complaint at a New York District Court, hoping to shut down the Library Genesis project and the SciHub.org search engine. The sites, which are particularly popular in developing nations where access to academic works is relatively expensive, are accused of pirating millions of scientific articles….”