UoH, first in the country, adopts online education policy

“The University of Hyderabad (UoH) has adopted Online Educational Policy (OEP), the first Central University in the country. Addressing a joint press conference here today, University Vice chancellor Prof Appa Rao Podile and University Faculty Coordinator Prof J Prabhakar Rao, said as the European Union funded International Collaborative project (EU Project) ending this month, the University has adopted OEP. Under this policy, the University has set up an e-Learning centre where developing studio and multi media and other infrastructure with an estimated cost of About Rs 60 lakhs, will formally launch in couple of months, they informed. The aim of the centre is to promote, implement online courses designed by the teachers of the University, providing training to the teachers on developing e-Content by using enhanced technology of teaching and learning and operation, maintaining E-labs, virtual classroom, video conferencing room, they said. As per the UGS mandatory, 20 per cent of regular courses made on online by the UoH, they said the centre will also develop online courses Swayam platform which is a initiative of HRD Ministry to promote Open Educational Resources (OERs). There are plans to go for National and International collaborations for developing these, however, the centre initially focus on Capacity Buildign courses for both teachers and students, they added. Mr Prabhakar said that the EU project, which started in 2013, implemented by consortium of six university partners (four from India and two from Europe). Funding over one million Euros for the all six universities . The main objective of the project to enhance the quality, access and governance of undergraduate education in India through technology enabled learning with Indo-EU Higher Education partnerships and collaborations, he added.”

OPEN SCIENCE DB – Home

“Can’t access science research publications resulting from your tax dollar? Open Science DB is a mission-driven database led by students in life sciences and engineering. We aim to make research, especially federally funded projects, more accessible to the public by ?providing easy-to-understand summaries of peer-reviewed scientific publications….”

OpenAIRE survey about Horizon2020 template for Data Management Plans

“The European Commission provides Guidelines on FAIR Data Management in Horizon 2020. A template for writing a Data Management Plan (DMP) is provided in the annex of those Guidelines. The OpenAIRE project aims to support the Commission’s ambitions regarding Open Science and FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable – data. Therefore we are interested to learn about your experience with this specific template.”

Open science: historical perspectives – Clear Language, Clear Mind

“After the recent London conference on Intelligence, we visited the Science Museum in South Kensington. Unfortunately, we did not have enough time to explore everything, but we did spend some time in the flight section. A number of the texts on display highlight the importance of open science, and are worth posting here….”

Several of the postings show how secrecy and patents have held back the progress of science.

Wellcome Trust launches open-access publishing venture : Nature News & Comment

“One of the world’s largest biomedical charities, the Wellcome Trust in London, will launch an open-access publishing venture later this year. The idea behind Wellcome Open Research is to allow Wellcome grant recipients to publish their findings more quickly and to create a model that, according to the charity, other funders might adopt in future….”

Openness, Permission, Courtesy and Nuances of Licenses – ProfHacker – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“I have noticed before people on Flickr who give their work a CC license and then complain that folks take their photos without informing them (attribution, yes; informing/thanking, no). Sure, it’s good courtesy to thank folks if you use their photos, but such a hassle to do it for each photo you use on a slide deck or such. The whole point of using CC licensed stuff is to not always ask permission. That’s what the CC license is. Permission to anyone. To do what the license permits you to do. I realized that I always ‘favorite’ any photo I’m planning to use, so I guess I’m giving the creator some kind of indication that I like their photo, but not really telling them I’m planning to use it, or how.

I remember learning this the first time someone republished something of mine without my permission. If it’s CC licensed, the whole point is to tell them they don’t need to seek permission each time. It’s good courtesy, I think, to inform the author, but it’s not necessary. But it’s complex. If a for-profit entity republished my CC-BY-NC article, but publishes it openly and for free, is that a commercial use? What if the space has ads on it, is that a commercial use? If I publish my blog CC-BY and a for-profit magazine regularly republishes it, am I really OK with that? Am I OK with a magazine with values opposed to my own constantly republishing my stuff without my permission? What about if they take derivatives of my writing and use it in a different context, to really make an opposing point to mine, is that acceptable to me? These are not trivial questions, I think, for openness advocates to ask themselves.”

Make Data Count: Building a System to Support Recognition of Data as a First Class Research Output | Data Pub

“The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has made a 2-year, $747K award to the California Digital LibraryDataCite and DataONE to support collection of usage and citation metrics for data objects. Building on pilot work, this award will result in the launch of a new service that will collate and expose data level metrics.

The impact of research has traditionally been measured by citations to journal publications: journal articles are the currency of scholarly research.  However, scholarly research is made up of a much larger and richer set of outputs beyond traditional publications, including research data. In order to track and report the reach of research data, methods for collecting metrics on complex research data are needed.  In this way, data can receive the same credit and recognition that is assigned to journal articles.

‘Recognition of data as valuable output from the research process is increasing and this project will greatly enhance awareness around the value of data and enable researchers to gain credit for the creation and publication of data’ – Ed Pentz, Crossref.

This project will work with the community to create a clear set of guidelines on how to define data usage. In addition, the project will develop a central hub for the collection of data level metrics. These metrics will include data views, downloads, citations, saves, social media mentions, and will be exposed through customized user interfaces deployed at partner organizations. Working in an open source environment, and including extensive user experience testing and community engagement, the products of this project will be available to data repositories, libraries and other organizations to deploy within their own environment, serving their communities of data authors.”