Opening Up the Coffers of Foundation Knowledge

Foundations have a lot of reasons to share knowledge. They produce knowledge themselves. They hire others to research and author works that help with internal strategy development and evaluation of internal strategies, programs, and projects. And they make grants that assist others in gaining insight into social issues?—?be it through original research, evaluation work, or other work aimed at creating a better understanding of issues so that we can all pursue better solutions to social problems. In almost all aspects of foundation work, knowledge is an outcome.

While openly sharing this knowledge is uneven across the social sector, we do see more and more foundations starting to explore open access to the knowledge assets they make possible. Many foundations are sharing more intentionally through their websites, external clearinghouses, and other online destinations. And more foundations are suggesting?—?sometimes requiring?—?that their grantees openly share knowledge that was produced with grant dollars.

Some foundations are even becoming open access champions. For example, the Hewlett Foundation has authored a terrifically helpful free toolkit that provides an in-depth how-to aimed at moving foundation and grantee intellectual property licensing practices away from “all rights reserved” copyrights and toward “some rights reserved” open licenses. (Full disclosure: IssueLab is included in the toolkit as one solution for long term knowledge preservation and sharing.) (“Hewlett Foundation Open Licensing Toolkit for Staff”)

For those who are already 100% open it’s easy to forget that, when first starting out, learning about open access can be daunting. For those who are trying to open up, like most things, getting there is a series of steps. One step is understanding how licensing can work for, or against, openness. Hewlett’s toolkit is a wonderful primer for understanding this. IssueLab also offers some ways to dig into other areas of openness. Check out Share the Wealth for tips.

However it is that foundations find their way to providing open access to the knowledge they make possible, we applaud and support it! In the spirit of International Open Access Week’s theme, “Open in order to….”, here’s what a few leading foundations have to say about the topic of openness in the social sector.

James Irvine Foundation 
Find on IssueLab.

“We have a responsibility to share our knowledge. There’s been a lot of money that gets put into capturing and generating knowledge and we shouldn’t keep it to ourselves.”

-Kim Amman Howard, Director of Impact Assessment and Learning

Hewlett Foundation
Find on IssueLab.

“Our purpose for existing is to help make the world a better place. One way we can do that is to try things, learn, and then share what we have learned. That seems obvious. What is not obvious is the opposite: not sharing. So the question shouldn’t be why share; it should be why not share.”

-Larry Kramer, President

Hawaii Community Foundation
Find on IssueLab.

“Openness and transparency is one element of holding ourselves accountable to the public?—?to the communities we’re either in or serving. To me, it’s a necessary part of our accountability and I don’t think it should necessarily be an option.”

-Tom Kelly, Vice President of Knowledge, Evaluation and Learning

Packard Foundation
Find on IssueLab.

“Why do we want to share these things? …One, because it’s great to share what we’re learning, what’s worked, what hasn’t, what impact has been made so that others can learn from the work that our grantees are doing so that they can either not reinvent the wheel, gain insights from it or learn from where we’ve gone wrong… I think it helps to build the field overall since we’re sharing what we’re learning.”

-Bernadette Sangalang, Program Officer

The Rockefeller Foundation
Find on IssueLab

“To ensure that we hold ourselves to this high bar, The Rockefeller Foundation pre-commits itself to sharing the results of its evaluations?—?well before the results are even known.”

-Veronica Olazabal, Shawna Hoffman, and Nadia Asgaraly
(Read more on why the Rockefeller Foundation is open for good.)

If you are a foundation ready to make open access the norm as part of your impact operations, here’s how you can become an open knowledge organization today.

This post was written by IssueLab. IssueLab believes that social sector knowledge is a public good that is meant to be freely accessible to all. We collect and share the sector’s knowledge assets and we support the social sector’s adoption of open knowledge practicesVisit our collection of ~23,000 open access resources. While you’re there, add your knowledge?—?it takes minutes and costs nothing. Find out what we’re open in order to do here. IssueLab is a service of Foundation Center.

These Nonprofits Make Research Openly Available. Here’s Why!

The nonprofit sector has a long history of partnering with researchers and academic institutions to uncover evidence about social issues through research and reporting. In addition, evaluators measure the success of the sector’s programs and initiatives and record outcomes and lessons learned. All of this thoughtful work is meant to inspire innovation in the social space, informing the sector’s strategies and moving forward with evidence.

IssueLab is an open access repository with close to 23,000 resources produced by nonprofits, foundations, and academic research centers. Everything IssueLab collects is freely and openly available. For International Open Access Week, nonprofits who share their work through IssueLab were asked to complete the sentence: “Open in order to…”

Here’s what they say:

The Robina Institute
Working to achieve change in sentencing and correctional policies and practice.

“The University of Minnesota’s Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice’s mission is to connect research with practice in the fields of criminal justice and sentencing law research and policy. The Robina Institute is open inorder to make sure those necessary connections between research and practice are easier, smarter, and more effective. By making our research and findings free and open and available on our website and on IssueLab, criminal justice practitioners, judges, academics, prosecutors, defense attorneys, decision-makers, funders, and other stakeholders, can access current and cutting-edge information at no charge.”

-Monica Wittstock, Communications Coordinator

Worldwide Initiatives for Grantmaker Support (WINGS)
A network of philanthropy associations to strengthen social investment.

WINGS is open in order to give voice to the many cultures of giving. We provide our network with information, knowledge, and peer exchange, resulting in a strong, global philanthropic community that strives to build more equitable and just societies around the world. As an example we have the Global Philanthropy Data Charter which is a framework that proposes both a code of good practice to improve the working relationships of those involved in philanthropy data?—?users, providers and collectors?—?as well as a framework for engaging other sectors (governments, corporations, academia and civil society in general) around sharing and using philanthropy data for public benefit.”

-Julia Catani, Programme Assistant

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)
Dedicated to promoting environmentally sustainable societies.

EESI is open in order to spread fact-based, useful information as far as possible and help policymakers and key stakeholders make informed decisions. We see sharing information as an important part of our mission to advance sustainable solutions and climate action. It is critically important and urgent to transition to renewable energy, to increase our energy efficiency, and to become more resilient: that’s why we believe in making our research as accessible as possible.”

-Amaury Laporte, Communications Director

Equal Measure
Creating more powerful, enduring systems for social change.

Equal Measure is open in order to share knowledge, and inspire conversation, about the many structural and systemic challenges faced by individuals in the communities where we work. As a learning organization, we consider it imperative to support an environment in which researchers, evaluators, funders, community leaders, and social sector practitioners have unfettered access to data and information that can help shape policy and practice change. We applaud the efforts of IssueLab and other platforms to make research on the most salient issues facing our nation available and accessible to all.”

-Seth Klukoff, Senior Director of Communications

Heartland Alliance
One of the world’s leading anti-poverty organizations.

Heartland Alliance is open in order to equip individuals at every level (nonprofit, foundation, government, and local communities) with the impactful and accessible information needed to support legislative, programmatic, and community efforts in the fight to end poverty.”

-Amber Cason, Communications Coordinator

European Foundation Centre
The platform for and champion of institutional philanthropy?—?with a focus onEurope.

European Foundation Centre is open in order to provide free access to publications about philanthropy and (and/or published by) EFC members to help share their work and experiences with their peers and promote the impact and role of philanthropy in citizens’ lives; also to share valuable insights into and trend analyses of institutional philanthropy today.”

-Isabelle Piette, Policy & Programmes Officer

The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)
An economic policy think-tank.

CEPR is open in order to inform the public about what’s at stake in major policy debates on important economic and social issues. CEPR offers free, open-source, and up-to-date economic data and programs to interested researchers.”

-Kevin Cashman, Program Associate

This post was written by IssueLab. IssueLab believes that social sector knowledge is a public good that is meant to be freely accessible to all. We collect and share the sector’s knowledge assets and we support the social sector’s adoption of open knowledge practicesVisit our collection of ~23,000 open access resources. While you’re there, add your knowledge?—?it takes minutes and costs nothing. Find out what we’re open in order to do here. IssueLab is a service of Foundation Center.

IssueLab is Open in Order to…

For the 10th anniversary of International Open Access Week, the event organizers have challenged all of us open access cheerleaders to complete this sentence: “Open in order to….”

No problem! How much time do you have?

I know… Extra time doesn’t exist anymore. And that’s why we are going to fill in the blank with pictures (and a modicum of words) so you get why IssueLabone of the largest repositories for social sector research is open, at aglance .

IssueLab is open in order to enable free access to the full text of the social sector research we collect and preserve. We make it easy for anyone to discover insights and analysis about the social world we share and ideas and strategies about how to make it better! Add your knowledge now!

We’ll walk you through each step of why we’re open.

IssueLab is open in order to mainstream and showcase the social sector’s evidence base. One way we do this is with our topical special collectionswhere knowledge seekers can deep-dive into an issue and discover interdependencies across issues.

We never tire of featuring knowledge or making it more relevant.

IssueLab is open in order to make it simple for social sector organizations to create their own open access institutional repositories through our Knowledge Center Service. Use it to quickly create and share an e-library drawing on IssueLab’s collection, your own collection, or a combination of the two.

Promoting the work of nonprofits and making it easy to find is our speciality.

IssueLab is open in order to freely share the metadata we hold through our data provider services. Grab our openly licensed data and share it with your audience wherever it is!

Nonprofit research becomes searchable and browseable on IssueLab.

IssueLab is open in order to support the many practitioners and funders who use other Foundation Center services such as Foundation Center’s grant-seeker tools, mapping tools, and issue landscapes. Just one more way that our open access status lets us bring IssueLab’s content to knowledge seekers where they live.

Foundation Center platforms create even more visibility for our publishers.

So now you know! IssueLab is open?—?and helps the social sector open up?—?because without open access, none of this knowledge sharing is possible. To learn more about strategies you can employ to become an open knowledge organization, check out our Open Knowledge tools.

This post was written by IssueLab. IssueLab believes that social sector knowledge is a public good that is meant to be freely accessible to all. We collect and share the sector’s knowledge assets and we support the social sector’s adoption of open knowledge practicesVisit our collection of ~23,000 open access resources. While you’re there, add your knowledge?—?it takes minutes and costs nothing. Find out what we’re open in order to do here. IssueLab is a service of Foundation Center.

10th Annual International Open Access Week Shines Spotlight on Increasing the Impact of Research & Scholarship

Hundreds of events will take place across the globe to highlight the power of Open Access to increase the impact of scientific and scholarly research during the 10th annual International Open Access Week taking place from October 23-29, 2017.

This year’s theme of “Open in Order to…” is meant to move the discussion beyond talking about openness itself and instead focus on what openness enables—in an individual discipline, at a particular institution, or in a specific context; then to take action to realize these benefits. The theme also recognizes the diverse contexts and communities within which the shift to Open Access is occurring and encourages specific discussion that will be most effective locally.

“Since Open Access Week first began, we’ve made significant progress in building global awareness of the benefits of opening up access to research and scholarship. Around the world, institutions and individuals are increasingly embracing the use of “Open” as an enabling strategy,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC, which created Open Access Week and works to broaden support for Open Access to scholarly research. “Whether your mission is to tackle critical problems like climate change or ending poverty or to capitalize on the enormous opportunities that having the world’s knowledge at your fingertips presents, Open Access practices and policies can help you speed up progress towards achieving your goals—and that’s a very powerful, very appealing prospect.”

Open Access—the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need—is transforming the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. Providing Open Access to research has the power to accelerate scientific advancements and spur job growth in a wide range of fields, from healthcare to energy to agriculture.

Begun in 2007 as Open Access Day, the event was originally a partnership between SPARC and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States. In 2008, it grew into Open Access Week—a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. Today, thousands of individuals, institutions, and organizations across the world celebrate Open Access Week.

Below are just a few examples of how SPARC will be taking action during the week, and a list of community activities and events occurring around the globe can be found here.

  • #MoveFASTR: During Open Access Week, SPARC will launch a campaign to #MoveFASTR, encouraging US-based institutions and community members to reach out to their elected officials and ask that they support the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act. FASTR would require that articles reporting on publicly funded scientific research be made freely accessible online for anyone to read and build upon.
  • World Bank-SPARC Open Access Week Panel: In celebration of the fifth anniversary of the World Bank’s Open Access policy, SPARC and the World Bank are co-hosting an event to showcase the ways in which open is helping to achieve the Bank’s goal of eliminating extreme poverty. The discussion will feature the CIO of the World Bank and the Principal Librarian of the United Nations. The event will be held Thursday, October 26th, from 2:00-3:30pm EDT and will be live streamed online. More details and a link to the livestream can be found at https://sparcopen.org/event/world-bank-sparc-open-access-week-panel. Media members who would like to attend the event in person should contact Nick Shockey at nick@sparcopen.org.
  • “Open in order to…” Impact Stories: In celebration of the theme of this year’s Open Access Week, SPARC is today launching a microsite with a collection of examples that illustrate the concrete benefits of sharing the results of research—from harnessing the human genome to improving food production to help feed the world. The microsite is online at to.

For more information, please go to http://www.openaccessweek.org/.
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SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries though the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Learn more at sparcopen.org.

Originally posted at https://sparcopen.org/news/2017/10th-annual-international-open-access-week-shines-spotlight-increasing-impact-research-scholarship/

Theme of 2017 International Open Access Week to be “Open in order to…”

In conjunction with this year’s Open Access Week Advisory Committee, SPARC today announces the theme for this year’s 10th International Open Access Week, to be held October 23-29, will be “Open in order to…”.

This year’s theme is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available. “Open in order to…” serves as a prompt to move beyond talking about openness in itself and focus on what openness enables—in an individual discipline, at a particular institution, or in a specific context; then to take action to realize these benefits.

Open in order to increase the impact of my scholarship. Open in order to enable more equitable participation in research. Open in order to improve public health. These are just a few examples of how this question can be answered.

Established by SPARC and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives. This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 23rd through the 29th; however, those celebrating the week are encouraged to schedule local events whenever is most suitable during the year and to utilize themes that are most effective locally.

This year’s theme of “Open in order to…” also recognizes the diverse contexts and communities within which the shift to Open Access is occurring and encourages specific discussion that will be most effective locally. We invite the community to help us translate this prompt into new languages at bit.ly/translateoaweek

“Effectively communicating the tangible benefits that Open Access provides is essential for open to become the default in both policy and practice,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. “This year’s theme will help focus discussions during Open Access Week on those benefits of openness that are most compelling locally—whether that’s increasing citation counts, enabling anyone to learn from the latest scholarship, or accelerating the translation of research into economic gains—and encourage action to realize these benefits.

Last year’s “Open in action” theme encouraged all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same—from posting pre-prints in a repository to pledging to educate colleagues about Open Access. The 2017 theme will help build on that emphasis on action by identifying the end goals Open Access can enable and encouraging individuals and institutions to take steps to achieve those goals.

International Open Access Week is a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. The event is celebrated by individuals, institutions and organizations across the world. The official hashtag of Open Access Week is #OAweek. We also invite the community to use the hashtag #OpenInOrderTo to start an online conversation about the benefits of an open system of communicating scholarship.

For more information about International Open Access Week, please visit www.openaccessweek.org.

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About SPARC

SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries though the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Learn more at sparcopen.org.

Commit to Putting Open in Action this Open Access Week!

This year’s theme of “Open in Action” is all about taking concrete steps to open up research and scholarship and encouraging others to do the same.

We’ve created an Open Access Week action portal where you can indicate which key steps you’ll take to support Open Access this October and year round. With this year’s focus on action at the personal level, the action portal will help capture the individual efforts across the world that are driving Open Access forward and demonstrate the momentum toward openness.

Click here to visit the Open Access Week Action Portal

Below, you can find the menu of actions listed on the portal, along with additional information and links to resources to support each action.

Make a list of Open Access journals in my discipline I would consider publishing in and share it with colleagues. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals. The DOAJ is a great starting point that allows you to browse open access journals by discipline and discover open publications which might be a good fit for your work. You can also use resources like Think. Check. Submit. to evaluate journals before deciding to submit a manuscript.

Start a conversation about Open Access during a research group meeting, journal club, or staff meeting. Find opportunities to start a discussion with those in your department, lab, or research group about Open Access and how sharing research openly can increase the visibility and impact of their work. Use videos such as Open Access Explained from PhD Comics to help start the conversation.

Send at least one manuscript to an open-access journal within the next year. Once you have a list of open access journals that are a suitable venue for your work, commit to sending one of your publications to an open access journal over the next year. You can use WhyOpenResearch to find no-cost or low-cost open access options as well as tips for reducing the cost of publishing in journals that do charge fees and finding funding to cover related costs.

Deposit at least one of my articles into an open-access repository during Open Access Week and encourage colleagues to do the same. A growing number of studies show a strong correlation between making an article publicly accessible online and a significant increase in views, downloads, and ultimately citations for that article. Using tools such as Sherpa-Romeo or Dissem.in, you can determine what rights you have to make already-published work publicly accessible (an estimated 80% of publishers allow authors to make some form of their article publicly accessible), and the Directory of Open Access Repositories lists more than 2,600 repositories—both institutional and discipline-specific—among which you can find a good fit for your work.

Use the SPARC author addendum on my next publication to reserve rights to make a copy of my work publicly accessible. When you sign a copyright transfer form, you can decide which rights you want to keep, and which you want to give away. The SPARC author addendum is a legal instrument that you can use to modify your copyright transfer agreements with non-open access journal publishers. It allows you to select which individual rights out of the bundle of copyrights you want to keep, such as distributing copies in the course of teaching and research, posting the article on a personal or institutional Web site, or creating derivative works.

Contribute to a conversation on campus about institutional support for Open Access. Increasingly, colleges and universities are supporting faculty in making their research and scholarship open—from institutional open access policies to expressing support for Open Access in promotion and tenure guidelines. Using ROARMAP, you can explore which institutions and funders already have policies requiring research results to be made publicly accessible. If your institution already has supportive policies in place, work with colleagues to help make them more effective. If not, start a conversation about the importance of Open Access, how OA can benefit both faculty and the institution, and the various policies institutions are using to support faculty in making their research and scholarship open.

Sign the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) and commit to not using journal-based metrics in evaluation. Moving away from flawed, journal-based metrics of evaluation is an important step to help enable a larger shift toward Open Access. Now signed by more than 12,000 individuals and 900 organizations, DORA is a commitment not to use journal-based metrics, such as Journal Impact Factors, as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist’s contributions, or in hiring, promotion, or funding decisions.

Sign up for Impactstory and get an ORCID. Impactstory is an open-source website that helps researchers explore and share the online impact of their research. In addition to many other metrics, Impactstory provides a badge that tracks what percentage of your articles are accessible online and will measure progress in opening up your work. Impactstory uses ORCID, a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.

We hope you’ll put open into action during Open Access Week (and year round!) and help demonstrate the collective momentum for Open Access by registering your efforts through the action portal.

Click here to visit the Open Access Week Action Portal

Theme of 2016 International Open Access Week to be “Open in Action”

In conjunction with this year’s Open Access Week Advisory Committee, SPARC today announces the theme for this year’s 9th International Open Access Week, to be held October 24-30, will be “Open in Action.”

International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.

Established by SPARC and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives. This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 24th through the 30th; however, those celebrating the week are encouraged to schedule local events whenever is most suitable during the year.

The “Open in Action” theme will also highlight the researchers, librarians, students, and others who have made a commitment to working in the open and how that decision has benefitted them—from researchers just starting their careers to those at the top of their field.

“As Open Access becomes a more and more familiar concept, we must focus on the small steps everyone can take to make openness in research a reality,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. “This year’s theme will help showcase these actions, the individuals who are leading by example, and the ways this openness advances science and scholarship.”

Last year’s “Open for Collaboration” theme highlighted both the power of Open Access to enable better collaboration within the research community and the ways the Open Access movement itself is driven by collaboration. This theme of collaboration was embodied by last year’s global Wikipedia Edit-a-thon that improved content related to Open Access across the world’s largest open resource.

International Open Access Week is a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. The event is celebrated by individuals, institutions and organizations across the world.  For more information about International Open Access Week, please visit www.openaccessweek.org.

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About SPARC

SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries through the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Learn more at sparcopen.org.

SPARC & Wikipedia Library Announce the Wikipedia Open Access Week Edit-a-thon

In celebration of International Open Access Week and this year’s theme of “Open for Collaboration,” SPARC and the Wikimedia Foundation’s Wikipedia Library are co-hosting a global, virtual edit-a-thon for Open Access-related content on Wikipedia. 

Wikipedia is the first source that many consult about Open Access and related topics.  Because of this, our community has an important interest in ensuring that Wikipedia has accurate, comprehensive coverage of Open Access in languages that make this information available to everyone around the world.

Specifically, the edit-a-thon will aim to accomplish three goals during the week: to improve already existing Open Access-related pages, to create new content where it needs to be added, and to translate Open Access-related pages into languages where they don’t yet exist.

You don’t need to be an expert Wikipedia editor to contribute.  In fact, you don’t need any editing experience at all!   All you need is an interest in Open Access and willingness to share your knowledge by adding it to an article or translating information into a new language.  Training for new editors will be provided as part of the event.

A homepage for the Open Access Week Edit-a-thon has been setup on the Wikimedia website at https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/The_Wikipedia_Library/OA_week.  On this page, you’ll find everything you need to participate, including:

  • Detailed instructions for creating, improving, and translating Open Access-related articles
  • Lists of Open Access-related articles that need to be improved
  • Suggestions for relevant articles that need to be created
  • Information of daily check-ins and training events
  • Links to tutorials on how to edit Wikipedia for beginners

Our initial goal is to have 1,000 community-contributed improvements to Open Access-related content made during the week, and we need your help to reach this mark.  

We will be hosting two introductory webcasts that will cover the basics of editing Wikipedia. Scheduled for September 30th from 10-11am PDT / 1-2pm EDT / 5-6pm GMT, the first introductory webcast will be especially for librarians and will be hosted by Phoebe Ayers, a librarian at MIT and former member of the Wikimedia Foundation’s Board of Trustees.  The webcast can be joined on September 30th at https://join.onstreammedia.com/go/sparc/0930wikitraining.

We’re excited to celebrate this year’s “Open for Collaboration” theme with a virtual event that everyone in the Open Access community can participate in, and we hope you will join us! We also encourage those who are interested to host in-person edit-a-thons on Open Access during the week and register them here on the Open Access Week website.

If you would like to receive updates on the edit-a-thon or volunteer to get more involved, please register your interest here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1WQ4h5bMtSJyNBFY7Y9eX3KMWifyYDbAJNn0vScb–xg.  

If you have any specific questions, you can reach the edit-a-thon organizers at the following addresses:

            Jake Orlowitz: jorlowitz [at] Wikimedia [dot] org
            Nick Shockey: nick [at] arl [dot] org

Welcome to the updated Open Access Week website!

We’ve updated and simplified the Open Access Week website, which we hope will make it more useful and easier to navigate.  The homepage is the focal point of the revisions, and the new Featured Posts section will highlight curated content and resources to help plan and promote your Open Access Week activities.
 

While we’ve removed many of the feeds that populated the old homepage, you can view a consolidated feed in the Community Engagement tab that will display all activity on the Open Access Week network—from blog posts to events to photos and videos.  All of the content has been preserved in this transition, and the URLs for pages have remained the same.
 
We will continue to make tweaks and updates to the site now that we’ve transitioned to the new layout, and we welcome and thoughts or suggestions you have for how we can continue to improve this as a resource for the community.

 

OpenCon 2015 Applications are Open!

Applications to attend OpenCon 2015 on November 14-16 in Brussels, Belgium are now open! The application is available on the OpenCon website at opencon2015.org/attend and includes the opportunity to apply for a travel scholarship to cover the cost of travel and accommodations. Applications will close on June 22nd at 11:59pm PDT.
 

OpenCon seeks to bring together the most capable, motivated students and early career academic professionals from around the world to advance Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data—regardless of their ability to cover travel costs.  In 2014, more than 80% of attendees received support.  Due to this, attendance at OpenCon is by application only.
 

Students and early career academic professionals of all experience levels are encouraged to apply.  We want to support those who have ideas for new projects and initiatives in addition to those who are already leading them.  The most important thing is an interest in advancing Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data and a commitment to taking action. We also hope to use applications to connect applicants with opportunities for collaboration, local events in your area, and scholarship opportunities to attend other relevant conferences.
 

OpenCon is equal parts conference and community.  The meeting in Brussels serves as the centerpiece of a much larger network to foster initiatives and collaboration among the next generation across OpenCon’s issue areas.  Become an active part of the community by joining our discussion list, tuning in for our monthly community calls and webcasts, or hosting an OpenCon satellite event in your community.
 

Apply now, and join the OpenCon community today!
 

 
About OpenCon:

Hosted by the Right to Research Coalition and SPARC, OpenCon 2015 will bring together students and early career academic professionals from across the world to learn about the issues, develop critical skills, and return home ready to catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information — from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital data.  OpenCon 2015 will be held on November 14-16 in Brussels, Belgium.

 
OpenCon 2015’s three day program will begin with two days of conference-style keynotes, panels, and interactive workshops, drawing both on the expertise of leaders in the Open Access, Open Education and Open Data movements and the experience of participants who have already led successful projects.

 
The third day will take advantage of the location in Brussels by providing a half-day of advocacy training followed by the opportunity for in-person meetings with relevant policy makers, ranging from the European Parliament, European Commission, embassies, and key NGOs. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the conference’s three issue areas, stronger skills in organizing local and national projects, and connections with policymakers and prominent leaders across the three issue areas.

 
OpenCon 2015 builds on the success of the first-ever OpenCon meeting last year which convened 115 students and early career academic professionals from 39 countries in Washington, DC.  

 
Speakers at OpenCon 2014 included the Deputy Assistant to the President of the United States for Legislative Affairs, the Chief Commons Officer of Sage Bionetworks, the Associate Director for Data Science for the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and more than 15 students and early career academic professionals leading successful initiatives. OpenCon 2015 will again feature leading experts, and the program will be announced in the coming months.

Crossposted from http://opencon2015.org/blog/opencon-2015-applications-are-open