Theme of 2017 International Open Access Week to be “Open in order to…”

In conjunction with this year’s Open Access Week Advisory Committee, SPARC today announces the theme for this year’s 10th International Open Access Week, to be held October 23-29, will be “Open in order to…”.

This year’s theme is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available. “Open in order to…” serves as a prompt to move beyond talking about openness in itself and focus on what openness enables—in an individual discipline, at a particular institution, or in a specific context; then to take action to realize these benefits.

Open in order to increase the impact of my scholarship. Open in order to enable more equitable participation in research. Open in order to improve public health. These are just a few examples of how this question can be answered.

Established by SPARC and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives. This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 23rd through the 29th; however, those celebrating the week are encouraged to schedule local events whenever is most suitable during the year and to utilize themes that are most effective locally.

This year’s theme of “Open in order to…” also recognizes the diverse contexts and communities within which the shift to Open Access is occurring and encourages specific discussion that will be most effective locally. We invite the community to help us translate this prompt into new languages at bit.ly/translateoaweek

“Effectively communicating the tangible benefits that Open Access provides is essential for open to become the default in both policy and practice,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. “This year’s theme will help focus discussions during Open Access Week on those benefits of openness that are most compelling locally—whether that’s increasing citation counts, enabling anyone to learn from the latest scholarship, or accelerating the translation of research into economic gains—and encourage action to realize these benefits.

Last year’s “Open in action” theme encouraged all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same—from posting pre-prints in a repository to pledging to educate colleagues about Open Access. The 2017 theme will help build on that emphasis on action by identifying the end goals Open Access can enable and encouraging individuals and institutions to take steps to achieve those goals.

International Open Access Week is a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. The event is celebrated by individuals, institutions and organizations across the world. The official hashtag of Open Access Week is #OAweek. We also invite the community to use the hashtag #OpenInOrderTo to start an online conversation about the benefits of an open system of communicating scholarship.

For more information about International Open Access Week, please visit www.openaccessweek.org.

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About SPARC

SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries though the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Learn more at sparcopen.org.

Commit to Putting Open in Action this Open Access Week!

This year’s theme of “Open in Action” is all about taking concrete steps to open up research and scholarship and encouraging others to do the same.

We’ve created an Open Access Week action portal where you can indicate which key steps you’ll take to support Open Access this October and year round. With this year’s focus on action at the personal level, the action portal will help capture the individual efforts across the world that are driving Open Access forward and demonstrate the momentum toward openness.

Click here to visit the Open Access Week Action Portal

Below, you can find the menu of actions listed on the portal, along with additional information and links to resources to support each action.

Make a list of Open Access journals in my discipline I would consider publishing in and share it with colleagues. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals. The DOAJ is a great starting point that allows you to browse open access journals by discipline and discover open publications which might be a good fit for your work. You can also use resources like Think. Check. Submit. to evaluate journals before deciding to submit a manuscript.

Start a conversation about Open Access during a research group meeting, journal club, or staff meeting. Find opportunities to start a discussion with those in your department, lab, or research group about Open Access and how sharing research openly can increase the visibility and impact of their work. Use videos such as Open Access Explained from PhD Comics to help start the conversation.

Send at least one manuscript to an open-access journal within the next year. Once you have a list of open access journals that are a suitable venue for your work, commit to sending one of your publications to an open access journal over the next year. You can use WhyOpenResearch to find no-cost or low-cost open access options as well as tips for reducing the cost of publishing in journals that do charge fees and finding funding to cover related costs.

Deposit at least one of my articles into an open-access repository during Open Access Week and encourage colleagues to do the same. A growing number of studies show a strong correlation between making an article publicly accessible online and a significant increase in views, downloads, and ultimately citations for that article. Using tools such as Sherpa-Romeo or Dissem.in, you can determine what rights you have to make already-published work publicly accessible (an estimated 80% of publishers allow authors to make some form of their article publicly accessible), and the Directory of Open Access Repositories lists more than 2,600 repositories—both institutional and discipline-specific—among which you can find a good fit for your work.

Use the SPARC author addendum on my next publication to reserve rights to make a copy of my work publicly accessible. When you sign a copyright transfer form, you can decide which rights you want to keep, and which you want to give away. The SPARC author addendum is a legal instrument that you can use to modify your copyright transfer agreements with non-open access journal publishers. It allows you to select which individual rights out of the bundle of copyrights you want to keep, such as distributing copies in the course of teaching and research, posting the article on a personal or institutional Web site, or creating derivative works.

Contribute to a conversation on campus about institutional support for Open Access. Increasingly, colleges and universities are supporting faculty in making their research and scholarship open—from institutional open access policies to expressing support for Open Access in promotion and tenure guidelines. Using ROARMAP, you can explore which institutions and funders already have policies requiring research results to be made publicly accessible. If your institution already has supportive policies in place, work with colleagues to help make them more effective. If not, start a conversation about the importance of Open Access, how OA can benefit both faculty and the institution, and the various policies institutions are using to support faculty in making their research and scholarship open.

Sign the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) and commit to not using journal-based metrics in evaluation. Moving away from flawed, journal-based metrics of evaluation is an important step to help enable a larger shift toward Open Access. Now signed by more than 12,000 individuals and 900 organizations, DORA is a commitment not to use journal-based metrics, such as Journal Impact Factors, as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist’s contributions, or in hiring, promotion, or funding decisions.

Sign up for Impactstory and get an ORCID. Impactstory is an open-source website that helps researchers explore and share the online impact of their research. In addition to many other metrics, Impactstory provides a badge that tracks what percentage of your articles are accessible online and will measure progress in opening up your work. Impactstory uses ORCID, a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.

We hope you’ll put open into action during Open Access Week (and year round!) and help demonstrate the collective momentum for Open Access by registering your efforts through the action portal.

Click here to visit the Open Access Week Action Portal

Theme of 2016 International Open Access Week to be “Open in Action”

In conjunction with this year’s Open Access Week Advisory Committee, SPARC today announces the theme for this year’s 9th International Open Access Week, to be held October 24-30, will be “Open in Action.”

International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.

Established by SPARC and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives. This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 24th through the 30th; however, those celebrating the week are encouraged to schedule local events whenever is most suitable during the year.

The “Open in Action” theme will also highlight the researchers, librarians, students, and others who have made a commitment to working in the open and how that decision has benefitted them—from researchers just starting their careers to those at the top of their field.

“As Open Access becomes a more and more familiar concept, we must focus on the small steps everyone can take to make openness in research a reality,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. “This year’s theme will help showcase these actions, the individuals who are leading by example, and the ways this openness advances science and scholarship.”

Last year’s “Open for Collaboration” theme highlighted both the power of Open Access to enable better collaboration within the research community and the ways the Open Access movement itself is driven by collaboration. This theme of collaboration was embodied by last year’s global Wikipedia Edit-a-thon that improved content related to Open Access across the world’s largest open resource.

International Open Access Week is a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. The event is celebrated by individuals, institutions and organizations across the world.  For more information about International Open Access Week, please visit www.openaccessweek.org.

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About SPARC

SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries through the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Learn more at sparcopen.org.

SPARC & Wikipedia Library Announce the Wikipedia Open Access Week Edit-a-thon

In celebration of International Open Access Week and this year’s theme of “Open for Collaboration,” SPARC and the Wikimedia Foundation’s Wikipedia Library are co-hosting a global, virtual edit-a-thon for Open Access-related content on Wikipedia. 

Wikipedia is the first source that many consult about Open Access and related topics.  Because of this, our community has an important interest in ensuring that Wikipedia has accurate, comprehensive coverage of Open Access in languages that make this information available to everyone around the world.

Specifically, the edit-a-thon will aim to accomplish three goals during the week: to improve already existing Open Access-related pages, to create new content where it needs to be added, and to translate Open Access-related pages into languages where they don’t yet exist.

You don’t need to be an expert Wikipedia editor to contribute.  In fact, you don’t need any editing experience at all!   All you need is an interest in Open Access and willingness to share your knowledge by adding it to an article or translating information into a new language.  Training for new editors will be provided as part of the event.

A homepage for the Open Access Week Edit-a-thon has been setup on the Wikimedia website at https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/The_Wikipedia_Library/OA_week.  On this page, you’ll find everything you need to participate, including:

  • Detailed instructions for creating, improving, and translating Open Access-related articles
  • Lists of Open Access-related articles that need to be improved
  • Suggestions for relevant articles that need to be created
  • Information of daily check-ins and training events
  • Links to tutorials on how to edit Wikipedia for beginners

Our initial goal is to have 1,000 community-contributed improvements to Open Access-related content made during the week, and we need your help to reach this mark.  

We will be hosting two introductory webcasts that will cover the basics of editing Wikipedia. Scheduled for September 30th from 10-11am PDT / 1-2pm EDT / 5-6pm GMT, the first introductory webcast will be especially for librarians and will be hosted by Phoebe Ayers, a librarian at MIT and former member of the Wikimedia Foundation’s Board of Trustees.  The webcast can be joined on September 30th at https://join.onstreammedia.com/go/sparc/0930wikitraining.

We’re excited to celebrate this year’s “Open for Collaboration” theme with a virtual event that everyone in the Open Access community can participate in, and we hope you will join us! We also encourage those who are interested to host in-person edit-a-thons on Open Access during the week and register them here on the Open Access Week website.

If you would like to receive updates on the edit-a-thon or volunteer to get more involved, please register your interest here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1WQ4h5bMtSJyNBFY7Y9eX3KMWifyYDbAJNn0vScb–xg.  

If you have any specific questions, you can reach the edit-a-thon organizers at the following addresses:

            Jake Orlowitz: jorlowitz [at] Wikimedia [dot] org
            Nick Shockey: nick [at] arl [dot] org

Welcome to the updated Open Access Week website!

We’ve updated and simplified the Open Access Week website, which we hope will make it more useful and easier to navigate.  The homepage is the focal point of the revisions, and the new Featured Posts section will highlight curated content and resources to help plan and promote your Open Access Week activities.
 

While we’ve removed many of the feeds that populated the old homepage, you can view a consolidated feed in the Community Engagement tab that will display all activity on the Open Access Week network—from blog posts to events to photos and videos.  All of the content has been preserved in this transition, and the URLs for pages have remained the same.
 
We will continue to make tweaks and updates to the site now that we’ve transitioned to the new layout, and we welcome and thoughts or suggestions you have for how we can continue to improve this as a resource for the community.

 

OpenCon 2015 Applications are Open!

Applications to attend OpenCon 2015 on November 14-16 in Brussels, Belgium are now open! The application is available on the OpenCon website at opencon2015.org/attend and includes the opportunity to apply for a travel scholarship to cover the cost of travel and accommodations. Applications will close on June 22nd at 11:59pm PDT.
 

OpenCon seeks to bring together the most capable, motivated students and early career academic professionals from around the world to advance Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data—regardless of their ability to cover travel costs.  In 2014, more than 80% of attendees received support.  Due to this, attendance at OpenCon is by application only.
 

Students and early career academic professionals of all experience levels are encouraged to apply.  We want to support those who have ideas for new projects and initiatives in addition to those who are already leading them.  The most important thing is an interest in advancing Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data and a commitment to taking action. We also hope to use applications to connect applicants with opportunities for collaboration, local events in your area, and scholarship opportunities to attend other relevant conferences.
 

OpenCon is equal parts conference and community.  The meeting in Brussels serves as the centerpiece of a much larger network to foster initiatives and collaboration among the next generation across OpenCon’s issue areas.  Become an active part of the community by joining our discussion list, tuning in for our monthly community calls and webcasts, or hosting an OpenCon satellite event in your community.
 

Apply now, and join the OpenCon community today!
 

 
About OpenCon:

Hosted by the Right to Research Coalition and SPARC, OpenCon 2015 will bring together students and early career academic professionals from across the world to learn about the issues, develop critical skills, and return home ready to catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information — from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital data.  OpenCon 2015 will be held on November 14-16 in Brussels, Belgium.

 
OpenCon 2015’s three day program will begin with two days of conference-style keynotes, panels, and interactive workshops, drawing both on the expertise of leaders in the Open Access, Open Education and Open Data movements and the experience of participants who have already led successful projects.

 
The third day will take advantage of the location in Brussels by providing a half-day of advocacy training followed by the opportunity for in-person meetings with relevant policy makers, ranging from the European Parliament, European Commission, embassies, and key NGOs. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the conference’s three issue areas, stronger skills in organizing local and national projects, and connections with policymakers and prominent leaders across the three issue areas.

 
OpenCon 2015 builds on the success of the first-ever OpenCon meeting last year which convened 115 students and early career academic professionals from 39 countries in Washington, DC.  

 
Speakers at OpenCon 2014 included the Deputy Assistant to the President of the United States for Legislative Affairs, the Chief Commons Officer of Sage Bionetworks, the Associate Director for Data Science for the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and more than 15 students and early career academic professionals leading successful initiatives. OpenCon 2015 will again feature leading experts, and the program will be announced in the coming months.

Crossposted from http://opencon2015.org/blog/opencon-2015-applications-are-open

Theme of 2015 International Open Access Week to be “Open for Collaboration”

SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) today announced that the theme for this year’s 8th International Open Access Week will be “Open for Collaboration.” 

The theme highlights the ways in which collaboration both inspires and advances the Open Access movement—from the partnerships behind launching initiatives such as PLOS and ImpactStory, to the working relationships the community has established with policymakers that have delivered Open Access policies around the world.   The theme also emphasizes the ways in which Open Access enables new avenues for collaboration between scholars by making research available to any potential collaborator, anywhere, any time.

Established by SPARC in 2008, International Open Access Week provides an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access the norm in scholarship and research.  This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 19th through the 25th.

The “Open for Collaboration” theme will also explore how cooperation between stakeholder communities helps to set the default to open for scholarly communication.  At a broader level, the theme will provide an opportunity for Open Access supporters to consider working with those in similar, allied movements for Open Data and Open Education to advance common goals more quickly.

“The energy that’s generated when smart, committed people work together on issues they care deeply about is palpable,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC.  “This year’s Open Access Week gives us the opportunity to highlight examples of that energy in action – and to create opportunities for new partnerships to be forged.”

Last year’s “Generation Open” theme addressed the important role students and early career researchers play within the Open Access movement, and coordinated efforts between librarians and the students on their campuses have proven to be effective in advancing the conversation around Open Access at universities around the world. 

International Open Access Week is a distributed, community-driven week of awareness for opening up scholarly communication, celebrated by institutions and organizations across the world.  For more information about International Open Access Week, please visit www.openaccessweek.org.

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About SPARC

SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is an international alliance of academic and research libraries working to correct imbalances in the scholarly publishing system.  Developed by the Association of Research Libraries, SPARC has become a catalyst for change.  Its pragmatic focus is to stimulate the emergence of new scholarly communication models that expand the dissemination of scholarly research and reduce financial pressures on libraries.  More information can be found at www.sparc.arl.org. Connect with us on Twitter at @SPARC_NA

2015 Open Access Week Advisory Committee

SPARC would like to thank the following members of the 2015 International Open Access Week Advisory Committee:

Name

Affiliation

Ginny Barbour

Australian Open Access Support Group

Gerald Beasley

University of Alberta

Guy Bilodeau

Université Laval

Mary Burgess

BCcampus

David Carroll

Open Access Button

Martin Eve

Open Library of the Humanities

Sridhar Gutam

Open Access India

Kazuhiro Hayashi

NISTEP

Heather Joseph

SPARC

Adi Kamdar

Electronic Frontier Foundation

Roshan Karn

Open Access Nepal

Iryna Kuchma

EIFL

Joseph McArthur

SPARC

Erin McKiernan

Wilfrid Laurier University

Uvania Naidoo

University of Cape Town; OA SA

Bethany Nowviskie

University of Virginia

Ahmed Ogunlaja

Open Access Nigeria

Eloy Rodrigues

Universidade do Minho

Carolina Rossini

Public Knowledge

Nick Shockey

SPARC

Ina Smith

Academy of Science of South Africa

Hallie Thompson

University of Missouri; NAGPS

Program Director: Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC

Exceptional Students Aren’t the Exception: How the Next Generation is Leading the Charge for Open Access

Just over 18 months ago, I met two students at the March Meeting of the International Federation of Medical Student Associations (IFMSA). They were frustrated by their own experiences of running into paywalls while trying to read research articles and were determined to do something about it… they just weren’t quite sure what exactly.  In the wee hours of the morning one month later, inspiration struck, and the idea for the Open Access Button was born over email.
 

The email that started it all… received at 2:25am.

 
The two students—David Carroll, a medical student at Queens University Belfast, and Joseph McArthur, a pharmacology student at University College London—wanted to change the experience of hitting a paywall, to transform it from a disempowering denial of access to an explicit call to action.  The idea: to create a browser-based tool that would record users’ collisions with paywalls and aid them in finding freely accessible copies of research articles.

David and Joe recruited a talented team of student volunteers and developers from around the world to help build the Button, and seven months later, the Open Access Button was launched.  In less than a year, these two students went from learning about Open Access for the first time to launching a tool which was covered by the Guardian and Scientific American when the beta was released at the Berlin 11 Satellite Conference for Students & Early Career Researchers last November.

Since then, the Open Access Button has mapped nearly 10,000 collisions with paywalled research articles and continues to gain both use and notoriety, having been hailed by the likes of the Dutch State Secretary for Science and Randy Schekman, the 2013 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine.  The core student team has grown to more than twenty volunteers who run the project at a professional level.  They’ve done the hard work of building something from nothing, successfully securing funding from groups like JISC and the Right to Research Coalition and in-kind development from the great team at Cottage Labs.  And they’ve done it while being full-time students.

Tomorrow, all of that hard work will pay off with the release of a new, much more powerful Open Access Button. You can watch the launch live at www.openaccessbutton.org beginning at 1pm EDT / 6pm BST. While there are many improvements and additional features, one in particular could be revolutionary.  

Upon hitting a paywall, the new Open Access Button will automatically email the corresponding author of the article on the user’s behalf, letting them know someone unsuccessfully tried to read their work and requesting a link to a freely accessible copy of the manuscript (preferably from an institutional repository).  Then, if the author responds with a link, the Button will not only provide the link to the original user, but it will also serve the link to any person in the future looking for that article.  In this way, the Open Access Button has the potential to serve as a powerful pull mechanism encouraging authors to deposit their work into repositories.

While David and Joe and the student team they lead are exceptional, they are not the exception.  That’s the most exciting thing about working with students and early career researchers.  Their creativity, passion, and energy not only generate fantastic ideas but also see them through to completion.  Students and early career researchers around the world are already leading the charge for Open Access.

In the past year alone, national-level campaigns have been launched by students in Nigeria, Nepal, Tanzania, Sudan, and beyond.  Ahmed Ogunlaja founded Open Access Nigeria after attending the Berlin 11 Satellite Conference last November, and the student organization has already established chapters at universities across the country and will lead Open Access Week celebrations on 19 campuses this week.

Roshan Kumar Karn founded Open Access Nepal following the same meeting in Berlin.  Open Access Nepal is already running Open Access advocacy campaigns across 10 campuses in the country and has facilitated meetings with the Nepalese Minister for Education, Secretary of the Health Ministry, and Members of Parliament to advocate for Open Access policies at the national level. Beginning today, Open Access Nepal will host a three-day conference that will bring together students, librarians, faculty, leading government officials, and others to raise awareness about Open Access and develop a plan for accelerating the Open Access movement in Nepal.

 
A photo from the first day of Open Access Nepal’s conference this week.

In the United States, the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS) is pushing for Open Access to be a policy priority for those running for the United States Congress in November’s mid-term elections.  Jesse Kremenak, NAGPS’ Director of Legislative Affairs, is running an “Educate the Vote” campaign which asks candidates across the country for their stance on Open Access, among other issues, signaling that OA is a priority for American graduate students.

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, another Right to Research Coalition member, has integrated Open Access into its Global Health Research Index, which will grade institutions based on their commitment to making research outputs globally available.  Led by Chris Counts, the effort will evaluate universities based on the extent to which they promote and facilitate Open Access publishing by their researchers, and the impact of such efforts as calculated by the amount of research output that is freely available online, in full-text format.

This afternoon, the panel at the SPARC-World Bank International Open Access Week Kickoff Event will be led by Meredith Niles, a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University and former Director of Legislative Affairs for NAGPS.  Meredith played a key role in passing AB 609, the state-level Open Access bill in California, by organizing students and testifying before the California State Senate.  Meredith was also recently appointed to the Board of Directors for PLOS.

While these individuals are still beginning their careers, they’re already beginning to change how scholarship and science are shared. And for each individual mentioned, there are countless others leading their own projects and yet more still who lead by example, making their own work openly available and encouraging their colleagues to do the same.  

This year’s Generation Open theme for International Open Access Week celebrates these significant contributions that students and early career researchers are already making within the Open Access movement and highlights their importance as future faculty, administrators, publishers, and policymakers.  Just as Open Access Week has continued to grow since students partnered with SPARC to found it in 2007, it will be exciting to watch the impact the next generation of scholars and researchers has in making Open Access the new default as they launch their careers, publish their own work openly, and make their voices heard.

Theme for 2014 International Open Access Week to be "Generation Open"

Washington, DC – The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) announced today that the theme for this year’s International Open Access Week is “Generation Open”.  The theme will highlight the importance of students and early career researchers as advocates for change in the short-term, through institutional and governmental policy, and as the future of the Academy upon whom the ultimate success of the Open Access movement depends.  The theme will also explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers.

 

To be held from October 20 – 26, 2014, International Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.
 

“Open Access Week has blossomed into an event celebrated at hundreds of institutions on every continent across the world,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC.  “This year’s theme reflects the importance of putting our future scholars and researchers at the core of the shift to an open system of scholarly communication.”
 

The theme “Generation Open” will return International Open Access Week to its foundation.  Begun in 2007 as the National Day of Action for Open Access, the event was originally a partnership between SPARC and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States.  Since then, both student involvement in Open Access and Open Access Week itself have grown exponentially. 
 

SPARC’s student program, The Right to Research Coalition, has grown to more than 75 member student organizations, which collectively represent nearly seven million students in more than 100 countries around the world.  The energy, creativity, and passion of the next generation that sparked the National Day of Action for Open Access in 2007 can now be seen in projects like the Open Access Button, a student-developed tool that helps users find freely available copies of pay walled articles.
 

SPARC encourages advocates around the world to use the week as a catalyst for raising awareness of Open Access and to build a dialogue with the next generation about shaping the system of scholarly communication that they will inherit.
 

On Monday, May 19th at 2:30pm EDT (7:30pm BST), SPARC will host a kickoff webcast to help advocates begin planning Open Access Week events, featuring advice from experts who have organized successful events during previous weeks. More information and a link to register can be found at www.sparc.arl.org/initiatives/openaccessweek/2014/kickoffwebcast.

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SPARC®, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, is an international alliance of academic and research libraries working to correct imbalances in the scholarly publishing system.  Developed by the Association of Research Libraries, SPARC has become a catalyst for change.  Its pragmatic focus is to stimulate the emergence of new scholarly communication models that expand the dissemination of scholarly research and reduce financial pressures on libraries.  More information can be found at www.arl.org/sparc

Original announcement on the SPARC website: http://www.sparc.arl.org/initiatives/openaccessweek/2014/announcement