Read the December Issue of Cancer Medicine Online Now!

Cancer Medicine

Issue 2:6 of Cancer Medicine is live and available to read online.  A great range of articles in this collection, but here are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue:

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Phenotypic modifications in ovarian cancer stem cells following Paclitaxel treatment
Vinicius Craveiro, Yang Yang-Hartwich, Jennie C. Holmberg, Natalia J. Sumi, John Pizzonia, Brian Griffin, Sabrina K. Gill, Dan-Arin Silasi, Masoud Azodi, Thomas Rutherford, Ayesha B. Alvero and Gil Mor

Summary: We demonstrate that putative ovarian cancer cells with tumor initiating capacity that survive chemotherapy acquire molecular phenotypic modifications, which makes them distinct from the original tumor-initiating cells. The modifications that occur may not be the same in every patient. This suggests that treatment modalities should be modified to each individual patient. Further studies using our models will identify biomarkers for personalized treatment.

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ADAM17-mediated CD44 cleavage promotes orasphere formation or stemness and tumorigenesis in HNSCC
Pachiyappan Kamarajan, Jae M Shin, Xu Qian, Bibiana Matte, Joey Yizhou Zhu and Yvonne L. Kapila

Summary: Our data demonstrate, for the first time that CD44 cleavage by ADAM17 is a critical determinant of orasphere formation or stemness and tumorigenesis in oral cancer. Our data support the concept that therapeutics that target CD44 cleavage mechanisms within the stem cell compartment can impair stemness and thus hold promise for treating aggressive oral cancer.

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BRD4 associates with p53 in DNMT3A-mutated leukemia cells and is implicated in apoptosis by the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1
Helen Jayne Susan Stewart, Gillian Abigail Horne, Sarah Bastow and Timothy James Telfer Chevassut

Summary: The bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 blocks BRD4 binding to acetylated histones leading to apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells. We find JQ1 exhibits synergistic activity with histone deacetylase inhibitors, Nutlin-3 and daunorubicin suggesting involvement of p53. We show that BRD4 interacts with p53, suggesting a role in DNA damage repair response that is disrupted by JQ1 in DNMT3A/NPM1-mutated OCI-AML3 leukemia cells.

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Read the Latest Highlights from Cancer Medicine

Cancer Medicine

Cancer Medicine Issue 2:5 is online and avilable to read now!

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.  The journal is fully open access so all of our articles are freely immediately available to read, download and share. 

You can access all our content here.

Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the October issue. 

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Oxyphenisatin acetate (NSC 59687) triggers a cell starvation response leading to autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, and autocrine TNF?-mediated apoptosis
Bethanie L. Morrison, Michael E. Mullendore, Luke H. Stockwin, Suzanne Borgel, Melinda G. Hollingshead and Dianne L. Newton

Summary: The mechanistic basis for oxyphenisatin acetate anti-cancer activity remains unresolved. This study demonstrates that exposure is associated with an acute nutrient deprivation response leading to translation inhibition, induction of autophagy, transient estrogen receptor (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Ultimately these effects promote apoptosis induction, which in ER+ breast cancer cells is mediated by autocrine TNF? production. This is the first study implicating a nutrient deprivation response as central to the downstream effects of oxyphenisatin acetate.

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Treatment with the vascular disruptive agent OXi4503 induces an immediate and widespread epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the surviving tumor
Theodora Fifis, Linh Nguyen, Cathy Malcontenti-Wilson, Lie Sam Chan, Patricia Luiza Nunes Costa, Jurstine Daruwalla, Mehrdad Nikfarjam, Vijayaragavan Muralidharan, Mark Waltham, Erik W. Thompson and Christopher Christophi

Summary: Vascular disruptive treatments effectively destroy over 90% of solid tumors with minimal effects on host tissues but a viable rim of cells persists in the tumor periphery that leads to recurrence. An immediate and widespread epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs within the viable rim after treatment that may be responsible for this resistance to treatment. Targeting EMT in combination with vascular disruptive agents or other therapies in the clinic may improve treatment outcomes.

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Preimmunization of donor lymphocytes enhances antitumor immunity of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Koji Suzuki, Kouichirou Aida, Reina Miyakawa, Kenta Narumi, Takeshi Udagawa, Teruhiko Yoshida, Yusei Ohshima and Kazunori Aoki

Summary: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can create an environment strongly supporting the enhancement of antitumor immunity. However, it was rare to cure tumor-bearing mice. We showed that the pre-immunization of donor lymphocytes by intratumoral interferon alpha gene transfer was highly effective in enhancing the antitumor immunity of HSCT and eradicated tumors.

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Cancer Medicine Accepted for MEDLINE Indexing

CancerMedicineCoverFinalWe are delighted to announce that Cancer Medicine has been accepted for indexing in MEDLINE. Coverage will begin from the first issue. This is fantastic news for the journal as it confirms its status as a quality publication across all areas of Cancer science. This follows the journal’s inclusion in PubMed and listing in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Cancer Medicine has now published five issues and continues to receive high quality submissions.

To submit your paper to Cancer Medicine visit the online submission site >

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Read the June Issue of Cancer Medicine Online Now!

Cancer Medicine

Issue 2:3 of Cancer Medicine is live and available to read online

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.

Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue.  We hope that you enjoy this exciting new content.

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Prognostic impact and the relevance of PTEN copy number alterations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving bevacizumab
Timothy J. Price, Jennifer E. Hardingham, Chee K. Lee, Amanda R. Townsend, Joseph W. Wrin, Kate Wilson, Andrew Weickhardt, Robert J. Simes, Carmel Murone and Niall C. Tebbutt

Summary: Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) remains controversial as a predictive and prognostic marker. There also remains uncertainty as to the best method to assess PTEN status. Here, we use PTEN copy number and assess the association of outcome and PTEN loss, as defined by copy number variation.

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A contemporary analysis of morbidity and outcomes in cytoreduction/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion
Michelle Haslinger, Valerie Francescutti, Kristopher Attwood, Judith Andrea McCart, Marwan Fakih, John M. Kane III and Joseph J. Skitzki

Summary: In the contemporary setting, cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CS/HIPEC) are associated with a low mortality and improved survival. When present, complications are associated with a decreased overall survival. This treatment modality should be considered within the context of multidisciplinary care for select peritoneal carcinomatosis patients.

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Comparison of the accuracy of Hybrid Capture II and polymerase chain reaction in detecting clinically important cervical dysplasia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Hung N. Luu, Kristina R. Dahlstrom, Patricia Dolan Mullen, Helena M. VonVille and Michael E. Scheurer

Summary: The selection of a screening test is important to detect clinically relevant cases of Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection while avoiding the unnecessary cost, stress and compromise of the cervix to patients associated with over-treating mild cytological abnormalities. Given the clinical relevance and importance of cervical cancer worldwide, our results support the use of Hybrid Capture II (HCII) in cervical screening programs.

Cancer Medicine is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal providing rapid publication of cutting-edge research from global biomedical researchers across the cancer sciences.

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Issue 2:2 of Cancer Medicine now live!

Cancer Medicine

You can read Issue 2:2 of Cancer Medicine online now!

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.

Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue.  We hope that you enjoy this exciting new content.

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GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression
Claudia M. Gutschalk, Archana K. Yanamandra, Nina Linde, Alice Meides, Sofia Depner and Margareta M. Mueller

Summary: In this study we analyze the contribution of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to tumor invasion and proteinase expression and activation in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. We could demonstrate that GM-CSF contributes to tumor progression, enhancing the migratory capacity in vitro and tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue and stromal activation such as angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, in a complex 3D in vitro model, GM-CSF overexpression or treatment was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the observed increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26.

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Complexity in cancer biology: is systems biology the answer?
Evangelia Koutsogiannouli, Athanasios G. Papavassiliou and Nikolaos A. Papanikolaou

Summary: Tumor tissues consist of different types of cells with altered genetic, epigenetic, and protein networks. We propose a simple conceptual model to account for oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins forming different complexes within and between tumor cells.

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Is there a role for immune checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab in prostate cancer?
Edward Cha and Eric J. Small

Summary: Ipilimumab, a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4)-blocking monoclonal antibody, is thought to augment natural immune responses to tumors. Ipilimumab is approved in several countries to treat advanced melanoma, and it is now under phase 3 investigation in prostate cancer based on the results of 7 smaller clinical trials, as reviewed in this article.

Cancer Medicine is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal providing rapid publication of cutting-edge research from global biomedical researchers across the cancer sciences.

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Cancer Medicine Publishes Issue 2:1

Cancer Medicine

You can read Issue 2:1 of Cancer Medicine online now!

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.

Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue.  We hope that you enjoy this exciting new content.

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Optimization of routine KRAS mutation PCR-based testing procedure for rational individualized first-line-targeted therapy selection in metastatic colorectal cancer
Anne-Sophie Chretien, Alexandre Harlé, Magali Meyer-Lefebvre, Marie Rouyer, Marie Husson, Carole Ramacci, Valentin Harter, Pascal Genin, Agnès Leroux and Jean-Louis Merlin

Summary: We performed our study with three techniques (TaqMan, HRM and PCR-RFLP) on 674 paraffin embedded tumors specimens and processed retrospectively discrepancies with a fourth one (CE-IVD COBAS 4800 KRAS mutation test).The main finding of this study is to propose a routine scheme for the determination of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancers ensuring high specificity and appropriate delay for first line prescription of anti-EGFR antibodies.

purple_lock_openTargeting hyperactivation of the AKT survival pathway to overcome therapy resistance of melanoma brain metastases
Heike Niessner, Andrea Forschner, Bernhard Klumpp, Jürgen B. Honegger, Maria Witte, Antje Bornemann, Reinhard Dummer, Annemarie Adam, Jürgen Bauer, Ghazaleh Tabatabai, Keith Flaherty, Tobias Sinnberg, Daniela Beck, Ulrike Leiter, Cornelia Mauch, Alexander Roesch, Benjamin Weide, Thomas Eigentler, Dirk Schadendorf, Claus Garbe, Dagmar Kulms, Leticia Quintanilla-Martinez and Friedegund Meier

Summary: In patients with metastatic melanoma, brain metastases are the most common cause of death. Our findings suggest that hyperactivation of the AKT survival pathway in melanoma brain metastases promotes the survival and drug resistance of melanoma cells in the brain parenchyma. Inhibition of this pathway thus has potential as a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases.

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A safe and effective dose of cisplatin in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma
Akihiko Osaki, Takeshi Suda, Kenya Kamimura, Atsunori Tsuchiya, Yasushi Tamura, Masaaki Takamura, Masato Igarashi, Hirokazu Kawai, Satoshi Yamagiwa and Yutaka Aoyagi

Summary: An excess dose of cisplatin in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma may enhance rapid tumor growth in case of resistance to cisplatin. A relationship between cisplatin dose and a tumor growth rate suggests that cisplatin (mg) should not be applied more than creatinine clearance (mL/min/1.73 m2) especially when it is not clear whether a target of HCC is sensitive or resistant to cisplatin, and the targeted liver volume should be smaller than 200 times of the CDDP dose (mg).

Cancer Medicine is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal providing rapid publication of cutting-edge research from global biomedical researchers across the cancer sciences.

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Wiley signs Open Access Agreements with Helmholtz Association and University of Manitoba

Ten institutes of the Helmholtz Association and the University of Manitoba have signed up for Wiley Open Access Accounts.   These agreements provide active financial support and a streamlined process for authors to ensure open access to their published research in Wiley-Blackwell journals.  Authors affiliated with the Univesity of Manitoba and the institutes of the Helmholtz Association listed below can now benefit from these arrangements when publishing articles in Wiley Open Access journals.

Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung
Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum
Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt
Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE)
Forschungszentrum Jülich
GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

The University of Manitoba and the Helmholtz Association insitutions join a number of funders who have opened a Wiley Open Access Account since this was launched. Browse our listing to see the institutions / funders who have an account or partnership with Wiley Open Access.

More information about our open access options for funders and institutions can be found here.

The Evolution of Author Guidelines

Congratulations are due to PeerJ for succeeding in bringing into focus an essential publisher service that has been little publicised in the past.

The journal opened for submissions on December 3rd, and many tweets and blogs have been spawned by the following passage in the Instructions for Authors:

We want authors spending their time doing science, not formatting.

We include reference formatting as a guide to make it easier for editors, reviewers, and PrePrint readers, but will not strictly enforce the specific formatting rules as long as the full citation is clear.

Styles will be normalized by us if your manuscript is accepted.

Of course, it would be ridiculous to assert that every manuscript ever submitted up to this point had perfectly formatted references in journal style; in fact it is relatively rare to make no edits at all on a reference list. Journal Production Editors have been converting reference formats since journal publishing began; laboriously at first, but the digital revolution has certainly helped in recent years, with more automated processes and specialist typesetters taking on much of the tedium.

 As the PeerJ guidelines correctly state, a requirement for a particular style can help the editorial and review process, and I would go further in saying that it can impose some rigour on the creation of the reference list, helping to ensure that all critical elements are present. However, it has been the case for some time that publishers have barely batted an eye if an article happens to arrive in the incorrect format, as long as all of the important content was present.

 At Wiley, we took this a stage further on the launch of our Wiley Open Access program back in May 2011. We made a point of paring the formatting requirements down to a bare minimum for the entire article. The Author Guidelines state:

 We place very few restrictions on the way in which you prepare your article, and it is not necessary to try to replicate the layout of the journal in your submission. We ask only that you consider your reviewers by supplying your manuscript in a clear, generic and readable layout, and ensure that all relevant sections are included. Our production process will take care of all aspects of formatting and style.

And with respect to the references:

 As with the main body of text, the completeness and content of your reference list is more important than the format chosen. A clear and consistent, generic style will assist the accuracy of our production processes and produce the highest quality published work, but it is not necessary to try to replicate the journal’s own style, which is applied during the production process. If you use bibliographic software to generate your reference list, select a standard output style, and check that it produces full and comprehensive reference listings…The final journal output will use the ‘Harvard’ style of reference citation. If your manuscript has already been prepared using the ‘Vancouver’ system, we are quite happy to receive it in this form. We will perform the conversion from one system to the other during the production process.

There is no doubt that this service, which has been quietly in operation in most journals for some time, has now been thrown much more into the limelight, and this can only be positive because it showcases one of the valuable services that professional publishing can provide.

Reading through the blogs, I see that the more overt adoption of this service as a point of policy is already spreading to more journals, as it has to eLife, and Elsevier’s Free Radical Biology & Medicine.

 This can only be a good thing.

Will Wilcox, Journals Content Management Director for Life Sciences

Cancer Medicine Publishes Issue 1:3

Cancer Medicine

You can read Issue 1:3 of Cancer Medicine online now!

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.

Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue.  We hope that you enjoy this exciting new content.

purple_lock_openModulation of CXCL-8 expression in human melanoma cells regulates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis
Sheng Wu, Seema Singh, Michelle L. Varney, Scott Kindle and Rakesh K. Singh

Summary: CXCL-8 is a direct determinant of aggressive melanoma phenotypes, including tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and targeting CXCL-8 produced by tumor cells and the supporting stroma is a direction for studying this pathway to develop future melanoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

purple_lock_openEffectiveness of aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen in reducing subsequent breast cancer 
Reina Haque, Syed A. Ahmed, Alice Fisher, Chantal C. Avila, Jiaxiao Shi, Amy Guo, T. Craig Cheetham and Joanne E. Schottinger

Summary: Women who take aromatase inhibitors (AIs) alone or following tamoxifen treatment have subsequent breast cancer rates similar to women treated exclusively with tamoxifen even after accounting for adherence.

purple_lock_openUrban–rural disparities in colorectal cancer screening: cross-sectional analysis of 1998–2005 data from the Centers for Disease Control’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Study 
Allison M. Cole, J. Elizabeth Jackson and Mark Doescher

Summary: Colorectal cancer screening is effective, yet underused. Rural residents may face increased barriers to screening compared with urban residents. We describe significant urban–rural colorectal cancer screening disparities in the United States.

Cancer Medicine is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal providing rapid publication of cutting-edge research from global biomedical researchers across the cancer sciences.

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Cancer Medicine Publishes its Second Issue

Cancer MedicineCancer Medicine has now published Issue 1:2.

The journal brings together articles on a range of oncology specialties, covering cancer biology, clinical cancer research and cancer prevention, with authors from across the globe.

We hope that you enjoy the exciting new content Issue 1:2 has to offer! Below are some top articles which Editor-in-Chief Prof. Qingyi Wei has highlighted from the issue.

purple_lock_open Dose-dependent effects of calorie restriction on gene expression, metabolism, and tumor progression are partially mediated by insulin-like growth factor-1
Leticia M. Nogueira, Jackie A. Lavigne, Gadisetti V. R. Chandramouli, Huaitian Lui, J. Carl Barrett and Stephen D. Hursting

Summary: We compared the effects of different levels of calorie restriction (CR), with and without infusion of IGF-1 (a potential mediator of the anticancer effects of CR), on hepatic and mammary gland gene expression and mammary tumor progression. We found (1) several genes and pathways, particularly those associated with macronutrient and steroid hormone metabolism, are associated with the anticancer effects of moderate (30%) CR; (2) mild CR (20%) has little effect on gene expression relative to control, whereas 40% CR modulates metabolic pathways as well as a broad panel of stress-related and DNA damage-related genes, suggesting this level of CR is too severe; and (3) reduced IGF-1 levels can account, at least in part, for many of the effects of CR on metabolism-related gene expression and mammary tumor burden.

purple_lock_openEGFR targeting monoclonal antibody combines with an mTOR inhibitor and potentiates tumor inhibition by acting on complementary signaling hubs
Roshan James, Siddharth Vishwakarma, Indira V. Chivukula, Chetana Basavaraj, Ramakrishnan Melarkode, Enrique Montero and Pradip Nair

Summary: Nimotuzumab, an antibody with intermediate affinity and thereby limited skin toxicity combines synergistically with Sirolimus to inhibit the proliferation of even low EGFR-expressing cells. These molecules affect the complementary signaling hubs of EGFR and mTOR. The mode of action of the drugs is investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results would suggest the feasibility of this drug combination at doses lower than the current therapeutic doses, in cancer patients expressing EGFR differently.

Cancer Medicine is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal providing rapid publication of cutting-edge research from global biomedical researchers across the cancer sciences.

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