Wiley and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) launch Geo!

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Wiley and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) are thrilled to announce the launch this week of Geo: Geography and Environment. The journal will be the Society’s first fully open access journal, and positions the RGS-IBG and Wiley as world leaders in the publication of geographical research.

Geo is one of the first journals of its kind, publishing high-quality, original articles from across the spectrum of geographical and environmental enquiry. It has an interdisciplinary approach that spans the sciences, social sciences and humanities. The journal will focus on work of international significance, and welcomes submissions that bring new understanding to geographical research agendas, foster methodological development, and address contemporary geographical issues.

‘We are extremely pleased to partner with Wiley to offer a journal that will be at the forefront of many of the exciting developments within geographical and environmental research’ said Dr Catherine Souch, Head of Research and Higher Education at the RGS-IBG. ‘By offering an open access journal, the RGS-IBG is strengthening its commitment to publish and disseminate high-quality research reaching the widest possible audience’.

Geo is edited by Professor Gail Davies, of the University of Exeter, and Professor Anson Mackay, of University College London. ‘Growing imperatives for openness in science present both exciting opportunities and significant challenges for research’, said Professor Davies, ‘Openness has many meanings and the ethos of open access is still at issue. The RGS-IBG is actively shaping these debates and I am delighted to be editing Geo.’

Geo will publish articles under a choice of Creative Commons licenses, allowing authors to be fully compliant with open access requirements of funding organisations where they apply. For more information, and to find out how to submit an article, please visit the website here.

Good news- new editor for latest AGU open access journal announced!

ESS2 thumbnail 2 The American Geophysical Union (AGU) today announced that John Orcutt, a distinguished professor of Geophysics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and former president of AGU, will serve as the inaugural editor of its newest open access, peer-reviewed journal, Earth and Space Science. The journal will begin accepting papers in late summer 2014, and the first articles will be available in late fall 2014.

Earth and Space Science reflects the expansive range of science AGU represents, including all of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences, as well as related fields in environmental science, geoengineering, space engineering, and biogeochemistry. It will also include papers describing and presenting data, observations, instrumentation and methods that are important for advancing these fields. In addition to direct submissions, it will accept, via referral from other journals, articles that meet AGU’s high standards of excellence, but that do not fit the unique criteria of those journals.

Earth and Space Science is unique in the breadth of science it represents and its goal to contribute to a broader scientific understanding of the Earth and its environment, as well as our solar system and beyond. To make such an ambitious effort successful, we knew that we needed the guidance of a skilled and innovative editor who could help bring forth, peer-reviewed science and data that are important for societal decision making at all scales,” said AGU President Carol Finn. “I’m pleased to say that John Orcutt’s background makes him perfect for tackling this assignment, and I am happy to welcome him into AGU’s editorial community. Under his leadership I am sure that Earth and Space Science will quickly join the ranks of AGU’s other award-winning journals.”

Orcutt has published more than 175 scientific papers and book chapters. His research interests include the exploitation of information technology for the collection and processing of real-time environmental data, as well as seismology in the oceans and on land and marine geophysics. He is the principal investigator for the National Science Foundation’s MRE-FC Ocean Observatories Initiative Cyberinfrastructure program, and a participant in the National Research Council’s (NRC) study entitled Fukushima, Lessons Learned. Orcutt recently completed a review of hydroacoustics monitoring by the United Nation’s Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty in the Indian Ocean, and he chaired the NRC’s reviews of Ocean Exploration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Tsunami Warning System, and the Ocean Panel of the Climate, Energy and National Security Committee.

“For many years the Earth and space science community has lacked a space for publishing work on models, data from experiments and observatories, observational methodologies, instrumentation, and the complexities of integrating technologies for stable and long-term observations related to critical issues including climate and hazards. This has presented a significant barrier to scientific progress,” said Orcutt. Earth and Space Science will offer a timely and reputable solution to this dilemma, and as an open access journal, it will ensure that high-quality research is shared as widely as possible. It is only fitting that AGU, as the leading society for Earth and space science, is the home for this innovative and exciting new journal . . . and I am honored to be a part of its inception.”

A recipient of the U.S. Navy/AGU’s Ewing Medal, the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Newcomb-Cleveland Prize, and the Marine Technology Society’s LockheedMartin Award for Ocean Science and Technology, Orcutt received a Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair in 1996. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a member of the American Philosophical Society and a Fellow and Past President of AGU. Orcutt received his bachelor’s in mathematics and physics from U.S. Naval Academy, his master’s in physical chemistry as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Liverpool, and his Ph.D. in Earth sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography/University of California, San Diego.

Good news- new editor for latest AGU open access journal announced!

ESS2 thumbnail 2 The American Geophysical Union (AGU) today announced that John Orcutt, a distinguished professor of Geophysics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and former president of AGU, will serve as the inaugural editor of its newest open access, peer-reviewed journal, Earth and Space Science. The journal will begin accepting papers in late summer 2014, and the first articles will be available in late fall 2014.

Earth and Space Science reflects the expansive range of science AGU represents, including all of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences, as well as related fields in environmental science, geoengineering, space engineering, and biogeochemistry. It will also include papers describing and presenting data, observations, instrumentation and methods that are important for advancing these fields. In addition to direct submissions, it will accept, via referral from other journals, articles that meet AGU’s high standards of excellence, but that do not fit the unique criteria of those journals.

Earth and Space Science is unique in the breadth of science it represents and its goal to contribute to a broader scientific understanding of the Earth and its environment, as well as our solar system and beyond. To make such an ambitious effort successful, we knew that we needed the guidance of a skilled and innovative editor who could help bring forth, peer-reviewed science and data that are important for societal decision making at all scales,” said AGU President Carol Finn. “I’m pleased to say that John Orcutt’s background makes him perfect for tackling this assignment, and I am happy to welcome him into AGU’s editorial community. Under his leadership I am sure that Earth and Space Science will quickly join the ranks of AGU’s other award-winning journals.”

Orcutt has published more than 175 scientific papers and book chapters. His research interests include the exploitation of information technology for the collection and processing of real-time environmental data, as well as seismology in the oceans and on land and marine geophysics. He is the principal investigator for the National Science Foundation’s MRE-FC Ocean Observatories Initiative Cyberinfrastructure program, and a participant in the National Research Council’s (NRC) study entitled Fukushima, Lessons Learned. Orcutt recently completed a review of hydroacoustics monitoring by the United Nation’s Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty in the Indian Ocean, and he chaired the NRC’s reviews of Ocean Exploration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Tsunami Warning System, and the Ocean Panel of the Climate, Energy and National Security Committee.

“For many years the Earth and space science community has lacked a space for publishing work on models, data from experiments and observatories, observational methodologies, instrumentation, and the complexities of integrating technologies for stable and long-term observations related to critical issues including climate and hazards. This has presented a significant barrier to scientific progress,” said Orcutt. Earth and Space Science will offer a timely and reputable solution to this dilemma, and as an open access journal, it will ensure that high-quality research is shared as widely as possible. It is only fitting that AGU, as the leading society for Earth and space science, is the home for this innovative and exciting new journal . . . and I am honored to be a part of its inception.”

A recipient of the U.S. Navy/AGU’s Ewing Medal, the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Newcomb-Cleveland Prize, and the Marine Technology Society’s LockheedMartin Award for Ocean Science and Technology, Orcutt received a Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair in 1996. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a member of the American Philosophical Society and a Fellow and Past President of AGU. Orcutt received his bachelor’s in mathematics and physics from U.S. Naval Academy, his master’s in physical chemistry as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Liverpool, and his Ph.D. in Earth sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography/University of California, San Diego.

Wiley Launches First Open Access Journal to Support Pre-Clinical Systematic Reviews

LSJ-14-65274-WOAI-VW-EBPM-Cover_101x131Wiley today launched Evidence-based Preclinical Medicine (EBPM), a new open access journal and the first of its kind dedicated to publishing systematic review protocols and systematic reviews which summarise data from animal studies on subjects relevant to human health. The launch of EBPM consolidates Wiley’s position as the leading publisher in evidence-based medicine.

Systematic reviews are a form of meta-analysis, identifying, appraising, selecting and synthesising all high quality research evidence relevant to a specific question. EBPM’s synthesis of preclinical evidence will improve evaluation of the potential success of future clinical trials, improving the reliability and value of medical research.

The journal is edited by Associate Professor David Howells, of the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, and Professor Malcolm Macleod of the University of Edinburgh. ‘Evidence-based Preclinical Medicine aims to be more than just a journal’ said Professor Macleod. ‘By providing a foundation of pre-clinical evidence we can escape the enthusiasms and vested interests that can distort the application of research from animals to humans’.

The journal has developed a helpdesk to guide practitioners through the processes of systematic review and to help authors prepare their study datasets for publication. EBPM also publishes protocols describing the proposed approach for a systematic review, enabling readers to distinguish between hypothesis and evidence-based observations.

For more information visit: www.evidencebasedpreclinicalmedicine.com

Wiley Launches First Open Access Journal to Support Pre-Clinical Systematic Reviews

LSJ-14-65274-WOAI-VW-EBPM-Cover_101x131Wiley today launched Evidence-based Preclinical Medicine (EBPM), a new open access journal and the first of its kind dedicated to publishing systematic review protocols and systematic reviews which summarise data from animal studies on subjects relevant to human health. The launch of EBPM consolidates Wiley’s position as the leading publisher in evidence-based medicine.

Systematic reviews are a form of meta-analysis, identifying, appraising, selecting and synthesising all high quality research evidence relevant to a specific question. EBPM’s synthesis of preclinical evidence will improve evaluation of the potential success of future clinical trials, improving the reliability and value of medical research.

The journal is edited by Associate Professor David Howells, of the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, and Professor Malcolm Macleod of the University of Edinburgh. ‘Evidence-based Preclinical Medicine aims to be more than just a journal’ said Professor Macleod. ‘By providing a foundation of pre-clinical evidence we can escape the enthusiasms and vested interests that can distort the application of research from animals to humans’.

The journal has developed a helpdesk to guide practitioners through the processes of systematic review and to help authors prepare their study datasets for publication. EBPM also publishes protocols describing the proposed approach for a systematic review, enabling readers to distinguish between hypothesis and evidence-based observations.

For more information visit: www.evidencebasedpreclinicalmedicine.com

Veterinary Medicine and Science has launched!

LSJ-13-60909-WOAI-VW-VMS3-Cover

Wiley is excited to announce that Veterinary Medicine and Science has launched! This is a new, international, open access journal publishing original, quality peer-reviewed research. The journal covers all aspects of medicine and science related to zoo, production and companion animals.

Veterinary Medicine and Science aims to provide a platform where authors can submit interesting and original work related to the fields of fundamental and clinical veterinary medicine and science. The journal will provide a global forum where the best research is made available as quickly as possible.

And because the journal is fully open access, research is available to all, with no restrictions. All articles published to the journal are published under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, allowing authors to comply with Open Access Mandates.

Editor-in-Chief, Ed Hall, is based at the University of Bristol Veterinary School, where he heads up the Comparative and Clinical Research Group. His particular research and clinical interests are small animal gastroenterology and endoscopy.

Veterinary Medicine and Science is now open for submissions. For more information, and to find out how to submit your work, please visit the website here.

Veterinary Medicine and Science has launched!

LSJ-13-60909-WOAI-VW-VMS3-Cover

Wiley is excited to announce that Veterinary Medicine and Science has launched! This is a new, international, open access journal publishing original, quality peer-reviewed research. The journal covers all aspects of medicine and science related to zoo, production and companion animals.

Veterinary Medicine and Science aims to provide a platform where authors can submit interesting and original work related to the fields of fundamental and clinical veterinary medicine and science. The journal will provide a global forum where the best research is made available as quickly as possible.

And because the journal is fully open access, research is available to all, with no restrictions. All articles published to the journal are published under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, allowing authors to comply with Open Access Mandates.

Editor-in-Chief, Ed Hall, is based at the University of Bristol Veterinary School, where he heads up the Comparative and Clinical Research Group. His particular research and clinical interests are small animal gastroenterology and endoscopy.

Veterinary Medicine and Science is now open for submissions. For more information, and to find out how to submit your work, please visit the website here.

First issue of Regeneration is now available online!

Regeneration coverWiley is delighted to announce the launch and publication of the inaugural first issue of one of its newest open access journals, Regeneration. The journal is the first, world-class publication of its kind dedicated to the rapidly expanding field of regeneration and repair.

Regeneration aims to become the journal of choice for those looking to publish top quality, original research related to regeneration and repair in its many forms, and in all relevant animal and plant species.

Read Editor-in-Chief Susan Bryant’s inaugural editorial here.

Read the first published articles here:

Experimentally induced metamorphosis in axolotls reduces regenerative rate and fidelity  James R. Monaghan, Adrian C. Stier, François Michonneau, Matthew D. Smith, Bret Pasch, Malcolm Maden and Ashley W. Seifert
Salamanders regenerate limbs throughout life, but it is unclear how body size, aging, or metamorphosis affects regeneration. Here, we show that metamorphosis has a negative impact on limb regeneration rate and fidelity by limiting cell proliferation in metamorphic limbs.

Regeneration of reptilian scales after wounding: neogenesis, regional difference, and molecular modules Ping Wu, Lorenzo Alibardi and Cheng-Ming Chuong
Reptile scale development and regeneration occur through different processes. A–D, embryonic reptile scales develop from a flat bilayer epidermis to symmetric scale anlagen to asymmetric scale anlagen and further to mature scales. E–H, skin regenerates scales from flat wound epidermis to peg formation to elongating pegs and further to differentiating pegs. Despite these differences, they share similarities in proliferation patterns, epithelial–mesenchymal interactions and molecular modules.

Position-specific induction of ectopic limbs in non-regenerating blastemas on axolotl forelimbs Catherine McCusker, Jeffrey Lehrberg and David Gardiner
To test the hypothesis that retinoid acid (RA) reprograms the positional information in limb blastemas cells to a singular posterior-ventral-proximal (PVPr) identity, we treated blastemas at different positions on the limb circumference to determine whether ectopic limbs formed. We observed that RA treatment of blastemas in anterior and dorsal locations, but not posterior and ventral locations, resulted in the induction of complete ectopic limbs. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that RA treatment reprograms the information in blastema cells to the PVPr position on the limb, and demonstrate that RA can be used to induce a regenerative response in anterior and dorsally located non-regenerative wounds.

We would like to invite you to submit your research paper to Regeneration at www.regenerationjournal.com.  All authors retain copyright on their articles and all articles are fully open access upon publication.