Read the February Issue of Evolutionary Applications Online!

eva_7_2_coverThe February Issue of Evolutionary Applications has been published online. This issue features an image of a lone grizzly bear in Alberta, Canada, which relates to a study by Shafer and colleagues linking the genotype, ecotype, and phenotype in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). Toward this end, this issue also launches a new series of research highlights that will offer brief synopses of new work with direct relevance to readers of Evolutionary Applications from across other journals with the aim of exploring the breadth of potential applications of evolutionary theory from across fields and disciplines. The Editor-in-Chief Louis Bernatchez has highlighted the following articles as of particular interest:

purple_lock_open Genomic selection for recovery of original genetic background from hybrids of endangered and common breeds by Carmen Amador, Ben J. Hayes and Hans D. Daetwyler

Summary: The authors present two genomic selection strategies, employing genome-wide DNA markers, to recover the genomic content of the original endangered population from admixtures. They also compare the efficiency of both strategies using empirical 50K SNP array data from sheep breeds.

purple_lock_open Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours by Beata Ujvari, Anne-Maree Pearse, Kate Swift, Pamela Hodson, Bobby Hua, Stephen Pyecroft, Robyn Taylor, Rodrigo Hamede, Menna Jones, Katherine Belov and Thomas Madsen

Summary: The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to study cancer evolution in vivo. Since it was first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by 90%. In this study the authors focus on the evolutionary response of DFTD to a disease suppression trial.  The results reveal that DFTD has the capacity to rapidly respond to novel human-induced selective regimes and that disease eradication may result in novel tumour adaptations.

purple_lock_open Linking genotype, ecotype, and phenotype in an intensively managed large carnivore by Aaron B. A. Shafer, Scott E. Nielsen, Joseph M. Northrup and Gordon B. Stenhouse

Summary: In this study, integrated GPS habitat use data and genetic profiling were used to determine the influence of habitat and genetics on fitness proxies (mass, length, and body condition) in a threatened population of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The authors found that homozygosity had a positive effect on fitness these proxies, which may be indicative of outbreeding depression unintentionally caused by massive translocations of bears over large geographic distances.

We encourage you to submit papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines. We also welcome submissions of papers making use of modern genomics or other molecular methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

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Evolutionary Applications SPECIAL ISSUE: Climate change, adaptation and phenotypic plasticity

eva_v7_i1_OC_RevThe January Special issue of Evolutionary Applications edited by guest editors Juha Merilä and Andrew Hendry, reviews the available literature that studies the responses to climate change in a large variety of taxa, including terrestrial and aquatic phytoplankton, plants and invertebrates, as well as all classes of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles birds and mammals. Clearly this Special Issue is the most updated and exhaustive coverage on this crucial topic. The cover image features a collage highlighting some of the species that have been the subject of focus in this issue for their response to climate change. The Editor-in-Chief Louis Bernatchez has highlighted the following Special Issue articles as of particular interest:

purple_lock_open Climate change, adaptation, and phenotypic plasticity: the problem and the evidence
by Juha Merilä and Andrew P. Hendry

Summary:
This perspective article examines the levels of inference employed in studies where recorded phenotypic changes in natural populations have been attributed to climate change. Based on the reviews from this Special Issue, Merilä and Hendry conclude that evidence for genetic adaptation to climate change has been found in some systems, but remains relatively scarce compared to evidence for phenotypic plasticity. It is apparent that additional studies employing better inferential methods are required before drawing further conclusions.

purple_lock_openRapid evolution of quantitative traits: theoretical perspectives by Michael Kopp and Sebastian Matuszewski

Summary:
 In this review and syntheses article the authors review the theoretical models of rapid evolution in quantitative traits, to shed light on the potential for adaptation to climate change. In particular, the authors demonstrate how survival can be greatly facilitated by phenotypic plasticity, and how heritable variation in plasticity can further speed up genetic evolution.

purple_lock_open Climate warming and Bergmann’s rule through time: is there any evidence? by Celine Teplitsky and Virginie Millien

Summary:
In this article the authors investigate the hypothesis that the climate warming causes a reduction in body size. This hypothesis originates from Bergmann’s rule, whereby species in warmer climates exhibit a smaller body size when compared to endotherms found in colder climates. Reviewing the literature the authors find weak evidence for changes in body size through time as predicted by Bergmann’s rule.

We do hope you enjoy reading this month’s Special Issue, and encourage you to submit papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines. We also welcome submissions of papers making use of modern genomics or other molecular methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

Submit your article to Evolutionary Applications here >

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Evolutionary Applications Publishes issue 6.8

EVA-issue-6-8The December issue of Evolutionary Applications has been published online. The issue features an image of Whitefish (Coregonus macrophthalmus) on its cover pertaining to a study by Hirsch and colleagues on potential for future divergence in restored aquatic habitats.  The Editor-in-Chief: Louis Bernatchez has also highlighted the following articles as of particularly interest:

purple_lock_open Dynamics of growth factor production in monolayers of cancer cells and evolution of resistance to anticancer therapies
by Marco Archetti
Summary: In this article the authors use evolutionary game theory to study the dynamics of the production of growth factors by monolayers of cancer cells and to understand the effect of therapies that target growth factors.

purple_lock_open Herbicide-resistant weeds: from research and knowledge to future needs by Roberto Busi, Martin M. Vila-Aiub, Hugh J. Beckie, Todd A. Gaines, Danica E. Goggin, Shiv S. Kaundun, Myrtille Lacoste, Paul Neve, Scott J. Nissen, Jason K. Norsworthy, Michael Renton, Dale L. Shaner, Patrick J. Tranel, Terry Wright, Qin Yu and Stephen B. Powles

Summary: In this Perspective article the authors explore the areas and highlight future challenges of synthetic herbicide resistance research towards integrated and (evolutionary) sustainable weed management in major field crops.

purple_lock_open The effects of synthetic estrogen exposure on premating and postmating episodes of selection in sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish by Emily Rose, Kimberly A. Paczolt and Adam G. Jones

Summary: In this study the authors aimed to understand the effects of a synthetic estrogen (EE2) exposure on the sex-role-reversed mating system in pipefish and the resulting strength of selection in Gulf pipefish.

As always, we are keen to encourage papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines, and also strongly encourage submissions of papers making use of modern genomics or other molecular methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

Submit your article to Evolutionary Applications here >

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Evolutionary Applications Publishes Issue 6.7 Online

EVA 6 7 CoverThe November online issue of Evolutionary Applications has been published. The cover image  features the restored intermountain grassland at the base of the Bear River Range of the Wasatch Mountains, Utah, USA. The editor in Editor-in-Chief Louis Bernatchez has highlighted the following articles, which use evolutionary biology to address questions of practical importance, as of particular interest:

purple_lock_open Investigating the genetics of Bti resistance using mRNA tag sequencing: application on laboratory strains and natural populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti by Margot Paris, Sebastien Marcombe, Eric Coissac, Vincent Corbel, Jean-Philippe David and Laurence Després
Summary: This study investigates the genetics of Bti resistance in Aedes aegypti  using SNP polymorphism within cDNA tag sequences.  The authors showed SNPs  identified in  laboratory strains are transferable to natural populations, and that the same genomic regions are, to varying degrees, differentiated between laboratory strains. The findings suggest that most of the genes associated with resistance differ between laboratory and natural environments but common selected regions might also harbour key genes for Bti resistance.

purple_lock_open Back to the future: evolving bacteriophages to increase their effectiveness against the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Alex Betts, Marie Vasse, Oliver Kaltz and Michael E. Hochberg
Summary: The authors used Pseudomonas aeruginosa to evolve four different phage isolates though 6 serial transfers to produce a “superphage”, and showed that bacteria evolve a degree of resistance and cross-resistance to a foreign phage. The use of evolutionary engineering to develop “superphages” could be effective way to combat bacterial infections in hospitals, whilst reducing the risk of bacterial resistance compared to conventional methods.

purple_lock_open Assessing strategies to minimize unintended fitness consequences of aquaculture on wild populations by Marissa L. Baskett, Scott C. Burgess and Robin S. Waples
Summary: In this study, a model of coupled genetic and demographic dynamics has been used to evaluate alternative management approaches to minimizing unintended fitness consequences of aquaculture escapees. Results  highlight the importance of the timing of aquaculture escape, and that reducing aquaculture escapees through low-level leakage is more effective than reducing an analogous number of escapees from large, rare pulses.

As always, we are keen to encourage papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines, and also strongly encourage submissions of papers making use of modern genomics or other molecular methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

Submit your article to Evolutionary Applications here >

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Evolutionary Applications Publishes issue 6.6

EVA 6 6 facebookEvolutionary Applications has published its latest online issue addressing topics relevant to evolutionary biology such as conservation biology, disease biology and agriculture.

The cover image for this issue features a leopard hiding in the foliage in Kanha Tiger Reserve, India.

The Editor-in-Chief Louis Bernatchez has highlighted the following articles as of particular interest:

purple_lock_open Predicting bird song from space by Thomas Smith, Ryan Harrigan, Alexander Kirschel, Wolfgang Buermann, Sassan Saatchi, Daniel Blumstein, Selvino de Kort and Hans Slabbekoorn
Summary: This article investigates the use of remote-sensing data to predict the song characteristics of a widely distributed African passerine, the little greenbul (Andropadus virens). This work provides a link between large-scale remotely sensed environmental variables and observations of behavior that have applications to evolutionary and conservation biology.

purple_lock_open Fight evolution with evolution: plasmid-dependent phages with a wide host range to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance by Ville Ojala, Jarkko Laitalainen and Matti Jalasvuori
Summary: This study investigates whether it is possible to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance using a lytic bacteriophage capable of replication in a wide range of gram negative bacteria harbouring conjugative drug resistance. The authors conclude that, while it is necessary to maintain the selection for spread of drug resistances, fighting bacterial evolution with counter-selective attempts could be beneficial in the battle against drug resistance.

purple_lock_open The ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde fungus’: noble rot versus gray mold symptoms of Botrytis cinerea on grapes by Elisabeth Fournier, Pierre Gladieux and Tatiana Giraud
Summary: In this article the authors used genotyping and clustering analyses to sample isolates of the ascomycete Botrytis cinerea fungus, to determine whether isolates sampled from three French regions with noble rot versus gray mold symptoms belong to genetically different populations. This study indicates that noble rot symptoms are not specific to certain B.cinerea populations but instead seem to depend on microclimatic conditions.

We are keen to encourage papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines, and also strongly encourage submissions of papers making use of modern genomics or other molecular methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

Submit your article to Evolutionary Applications here >

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Evolutionary Applications Publishes issue 6.5

Evolutionary ApplicationsEvolutionary Applications has published a new issue exploring the ways in which evolutionary biology addresses biological questions of health, social and economic relevance.  The issue features an image of a young wood frog on its cover.  Editor-in-Chief: Louis Bernatchez has highlighted the articles below as particularly noteworthy:

purple_lock_open Molecular genetics and genomics generate new insights into invertebrate pest invasions by Heather Kirk, Silvia Dorn and Dominique Mazzi
Summary: This article reviews current applications of molecular genetics and genomics in the study of invertebrate pest invasions and outbreaks, and highlights shortcomings from the current body of research. It also discusses recent conceptual and methodological advances in the areas of molecular genetics/genomics and data analysis and highlights how these advances will enhance our understanding of these areas.

purple_lock_open Evolutionary dynamics of a rapidly receding southern range boundary in the threatened California Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii) by Jonathan Q. Richmond, Kelly R. Barr, Adam R. Backlin, Amy G. Vandergast and Robert N. Fisher
Summary: This study reviews the extensive decline in populations of the California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) since the 1960s due to contemporary disturbance. The authors conclude that while the effects of recent disturbance have left little genetic imprint on these populations, they likely contribute to an extinction debt that will lead to continued range contraction unless management intervenes to stall or reverse the process.

purple_lock_open Genetic and life-history changes associated with fisheries-induced population collapse by Lilian Pukk, Anna Kuparinen, Leili Järv, Riho Gross and Anti Vasemägi
Summary: This article investigates the evolutinary consequences of intensive fishing simultaneously at phenotypic and molecular level in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) population in the Baltic Sea over a 24-year period. This study demonstrates the value of combining genetic and phenotypic analyses in the context of long-term genetic monitoring and suggests that replacement or breakdown of locally adapted gene complexes may play important role in impeding the recovery of fish populations.

In 2013 we have expanded the scope of Evolutionary Applications. As before, we are keen to encourage papers applying concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance across a vast array of applied disciplines. We now also strongly encourage submissions of papers making use of modern molecular and genetic methods to address important questions in an applied evolutionary framework. For more information please visit the aims and scopes page.

Submit your article to Evolutionary Applications here >

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Evolutionary Applications Issue 6.4 Now Live

EVA_6_4_coverEvolutionary Applications has now published its latest issue. This issue includes a number of top papers highlighted by Editor-in-Chief, Louis Bernatchez:

purple_lock_open The impact of natural selection on health and disease: uses of the population genetics approach in humans by Estelle Vasseur and Lluis Quintana-Murci

purple_lock_open Genomic and environmental selection patterns in two distinct lettuce crop–wild hybrid crosses by Yorike Hartman, Brigitte Uwimana, Danny A. P. Hooftman, Michael E. Schranz, Clemens C. M. van de Wiel, Marinus J. M. Smulders, Richard G. F. Visser and Peter H. van Tienderen

purple_lock_open Evolutionary rescue in populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens across an antibiotic gradient by Johan Ramsayer, Oliver Kaltz and Michael E. Hochberg

The journal continues to receive a high number of submissions across all areas of evolutionary biology and we would encourage you to submit your paper to the journal. Evolutionary Applications publishes papers that utilize concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance. In order to better serve the community, we also now strongly encourage submissions of papers making use of modern molecular and genetic methods to address important questions in any of these disciplines and in an applied evolutionary framework. Two of the papers highlighted above are good examples of this sort of paper. Further information about the journal’s aims and scopes can be found on the website.

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Evolutionary biology steps up to the fight against cancer

EVA 6 1Cancer organizations in developed nations predict that 2 in 5 people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime.  Worldwide, the number of deaths due to cancer surpasses that of HIV, tuberculosis and malaria combined (American Cancer Society, 2011).  In response to these ominous statistics, the fight against cancer has spread into branches of science that are not traditionally associated with cancer research.   The field of evolutionary biology is a key example.

How can evolutionary biology help combat cancer?  The journal Evolutionary Applications has devoted the entire January 2013 issue to showcasing the many ways that evolutionary approaches can improve the understanding, treatment and prevention of a number of different types of cancer.  The multi-authored opening paper states: “an accurate evolutionary approach should unite and explain, rather than replace” the many avenues of cancer research (Thomas et al 2013).

This is the first compilation of its kind, and was spearheaded by international scientists affiliated with the Darwinian Evolution of Cancer Consortium in France and with the Center for Evolution and Cancer at the University of California, San Francisco. The issue is guest edited by Frederic Thomas, Michael Hochberg, Athena Aktipis, Carlo Maley and Ursula Hibner.

The general theme linking articles featured in the January issue of Evolutionary Applications is that improvements to our understanding of cancer can be gained by considering cancer as a complex ecosystem. Using the analogy of a forest, the fate of a forest depends both on the individual characteristics of trees, as well as the interactions of each tree with its biotic and abiotic environment.  Similarly, tumors can be comprised of cells that are genetically and physically distinct, and the fate of tumors depends both on cell-to-cell interactions within the tumor, as well as on the interactions of the whole tumor with the highly complicated environment of the human body.  

Evolutionary questions addressed in the issue include: Why do we get cancer?  How do evolutionary principles like natural selection, mutation, and genetic drift, work in a cancer ecosystem? How can we use evolutionary theory to minimize the rate of cancers worldwide?  Many novel results are reported in the published articles, including how blood vessels affect the internal environment of a tumor (Alfarouk et al. 2013), and how certain characteristics of tumors can help explain patterns of metastasis (Daoust et al. 2013).

Papers from the Evolution and Cancer Special Issue are all freely available on the Evolutionary Applications website: www.evolutionaryapplications.org

Michelle Tseng, Managing and Founding Editor

 References

 Alfarouk, K. O., Ibrahim, M. E., Gatenby, R. A. and Brown, J. S. (2012), Riparian ecosystems in human cancers. Evolutionary Applications. doi: 10.1111/eva.12015

American Cancer Society. Global Cancer Facts & Figures 2nd Edition. Atlanta: American Cancer Society 2011.

 Daoust, S. P., Fahrig, L., Martin, A. E. and Thomas, F. (2012), From forest and agro-ecosystems to the microecosystems of the human body: what can landscape ecology tell us about tumor growth, metastasis, and treatment options?. Evolutionary Applications. doi: 10.1111/eva.12031

 Thomas, F., Fisher, D., Fort, P., Marie, J.-P., Daoust, S., Roche, B., Grunau, C., Cosseau, C., Mitta, G., Baghdiguian, S., Rousset, F., Lassus, P., Assenat, E., Grégoire, D., Missé, D., Lorz, A., Billy, F., Vainchenker, W., Delhommeau, F., Koscielny, S., Itzykson, R., Tang, R., Fava, F., Ballesta, A., Lepoutre, T., Krasinska, L., Dulic, V., Raynaud, P., Blache, P., Quittau-Prevostel, C., Vignal, E., Trauchessec, H., Perthame, B., Clairambault, J., Volpert, V., Solary, E., Hibner, U. and Hochberg, M. E. (2012), Applying ecological and evolutionary theory to cancer: a long and winding road. Evolutionary Applications. doi: 10.1111/eva.12021

Wiley signs Open Access Agreements with Helmholtz Association and University of Manitoba

Ten institutes of the Helmholtz Association and the University of Manitoba have signed up for Wiley Open Access Accounts.   These agreements provide active financial support and a streamlined process for authors to ensure open access to their published research in Wiley-Blackwell journals.  Authors affiliated with the Univesity of Manitoba and the institutes of the Helmholtz Association listed below can now benefit from these arrangements when publishing articles in Wiley Open Access journals.

Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung
Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum
Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt
Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE)
Forschungszentrum Jülich
GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

The University of Manitoba and the Helmholtz Association insitutions join a number of funders who have opened a Wiley Open Access Account since this was launched. Browse our listing to see the institutions / funders who have an account or partnership with Wiley Open Access.

More information about our open access options for funders and institutions can be found here.

Editorial Highlights from Evolutionary Applications 5.8

EVA 5 8Evolutionary Applications has now published issue 5.8. This is the final issue of 2012 – the year in which the journal became open access! We are excited to introduce a new section in Evolutionary Applications from this issue onwards. Highlights will feature recently published papers that use evolutionary biology to address questions of practical importance. In this issue we have summarized the abstracts of the papers and encourage you to read the full paper for more details. We welcome suggestions for papers to include in this section and we encourage you to use this section to keep up to date on the latest advances in applied evolutionary biology. Read the Highlights in applied evolutionary biology for the December issue.

Another interesting paper from this issue is On-farm dynamic management of genetic diversity: the impact of seed diffusions and seed saving practices on a population-variety of bread wheat by Thomas, M., Demeulenaere, E., Dawson, J. C., Khan, A. R., Galic, N., Jouanne-Pin, S., Remoue, C., Bonneuil, C. and Goldringer, I. The idea of a baguette, warm and steaming, fresh out of the oven is enough to make even the pickiest eater salivate.  Wheat, the main ingredient of that gastronomical delight, is one of the top three most produced grains in the world, and much research is being devoted to devising ways to ensure that the beloved crop can continue to be mass produced in the face of global climate change. 

One key element that is instrumental to the long-term sustainability of wheat (and the beloved baguette), is the amount of genetic diversity found in wheat worldwide.  Without any genetic diversity, every single population of wheat would be exactly identical, and this would make it very difficult to continue to breed or even genetically modify, strains of wheat to be better adapted to the environment.  In other words, if every plant is exactly the same, it would be impossible to select and breed only the individual plants that are better suited to, say, arid environments.

In this issue of Evolutionary Applications, Thomas et al. investigate patterns of genetic diversity in a variety of wheat in France named RDB (Rouge de Bordeau).  The authors write that populations of this variety of wheat have been maintained and circulated by small farms for several years in France, and that knowledge of the patterns of genetic variation across the country can help inform wheat conservation practices.  The authors find that across France, some populations of RDB have quite large amounts of genetic diversity, while others do not.  These results imply that the existence of these small farms, and of the type of farming practices in these locations are crucial for the country-wide maintenance of genetic diversity in wheat.  These results show us that the network of small local farms, and the local varieties of wheat that they grow are likely to be instrumental in ensuring that the wonders of the French baguette will be enjoyed by many more to come.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles, and the others within the issueEvolutionary Applications is an excellent forum in which to publish papers which explore the contributions that evolutionary concepts or methods have made, so do consider submitting a paper. We are keen to encourage papers that utilize concepts from evolutionary biology to address biological questions of health, social and economic relevance in areas such as conservation biology, aquaculture, agriculture, medicine, forestry, fisheries, climate change, microbiology and toxicology.  All papers are freely available to read, download and share and are highly visible. For full details about all subject areas which we consider, please view the aims and scopes on our website.