MicrobiologyOpen Issue 3:1 Published Online

MicrobiologyOpenMicrobiologyOpen has published its latest online issue. 13 new articles are fully open access: free to read, download and share.

MicrobiologyOpen is a broad scope, peer reviewed journal delivering rapid decisions and fast publication of microbial science.  The journal gives priority to reports of quality research, pure or applied, that further our understanding of microbial interactions and microbial processes.

Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis has highlighted the papers below as of particular interest:

purple_lock_openUnsuspected pyocyanin effect in yeast under anaerobiosis
Rana Barakat, Isabelle Goubet, Stephen Manon, Thierry Berges and Eric Rosenfeld

Summary: Toxicity of pyocyanin (PYO) was investigated under aerobiosis and anaerobiosis in several wild-type and mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also in Candida albicans. PYO is toxic for actively respiring cells but its toxicity was found to be important and even higher under anaerobiosis. This indicates that PYO effect can be mediated by other phenomenon than oxidative stress and respiratory disturbance.

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Serum influences the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing genes and QS-controlled virulence genes during early and late stages of growth
Cassandra Kruczek, Uzma Qaisar, Jane A. Colmer-Hamood and Abdul N. Hamood

Summary: In this study, we demonstrated that serum reduces the expression of different QS genes at early stages of growth but increases their expression at late stages of growth of P. aeruginosa. A similar phenomenon was observed regarding the production of autoinducers and the expression of QS-controlled virulence genes. Serum also differentially regulated the expression several positive and negative regulators of the QS systems. While the mechanism by which serum affects QS at early stage of growth is not yet known, our results suggest that serum accomplishes its effect at late stages of growth through the virulence factor regulator vfr

purple_lock_openVisualization of VirE2 protein translocation by the Agrobacterium type IV secretion system into host cells
Philippe A. Sakalis, G. Paul H. van Heusden and Paul J. J. Hooykaas

Summary: Here we report the direct visualization of VirE2 protein translocation from Agrobacterium into host cells. To this end we cocultivated Agrobacterium strains expressing VirE2 tagged with one part of a fluorescent protein with host cells expressing the complementary part. Fluorescent filaments became visible in recipient cells 20-25 hours after the start of the cocultivation indicative of VirE2 protein translocation.

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MicrobiologyOpen Issue 3:1 Published Online

MicrobiologyOpenMicrobiologyOpen has published its latest online issue. 13 new articles are fully open access: free to read, download and share.

MicrobiologyOpen is a broad scope, peer reviewed journal delivering rapid decisions and fast publication of microbial science.  The journal gives priority to reports of quality research, pure or applied, that further our understanding of microbial interactions and microbial processes.

Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis has highlighted the papers below as of particular interest:

purple_lock_openUnsuspected pyocyanin effect in yeast under anaerobiosis
Rana Barakat, Isabelle Goubet, Stephen Manon, Thierry Berges and Eric Rosenfeld

Summary: Toxicity of pyocyanin (PYO) was investigated under aerobiosis and anaerobiosis in several wild-type and mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also in Candida albicans. PYO is toxic for actively respiring cells but its toxicity was found to be important and even higher under anaerobiosis. This indicates that PYO effect can be mediated by other phenomenon than oxidative stress and respiratory disturbance.

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Serum influences the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing genes and QS-controlled virulence genes during early and late stages of growth
Cassandra Kruczek, Uzma Qaisar, Jane A. Colmer-Hamood and Abdul N. Hamood

Summary: In this study, we demonstrated that serum reduces the expression of different QS genes at early stages of growth but increases their expression at late stages of growth of P. aeruginosa. A similar phenomenon was observed regarding the production of autoinducers and the expression of QS-controlled virulence genes. Serum also differentially regulated the expression several positive and negative regulators of the QS systems. While the mechanism by which serum affects QS at early stage of growth is not yet known, our results suggest that serum accomplishes its effect at late stages of growth through the virulence factor regulator vfr

purple_lock_openVisualization of VirE2 protein translocation by the Agrobacterium type IV secretion system into host cells
Philippe A. Sakalis, G. Paul H. van Heusden and Paul J. J. Hooykaas

Summary: Here we report the direct visualization of VirE2 protein translocation from Agrobacterium into host cells. To this end we cocultivated Agrobacterium strains expressing VirE2 tagged with one part of a fluorescent protein with host cells expressing the complementary part. Fluorescent filaments became visible in recipient cells 20-25 hours after the start of the cocultivation indicative of VirE2 protein translocation.

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MicrobiologyOpen Publishes Issue 2:6

MicrobiologyOpenThe December issue of MicrobiologyOpen can be viewed online now!

MicrobiologyOpen is a broad scope, peer reviewed journal delivering rapid decisions and fast publication of microbial science.  The journal gives priority to reports of quality research, pure or applied, that further our understanding of microbial interactions and microbial processes.

Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis has highlighted the papers below from the latest issue:

purple_lock_openDeveloping an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel
Anthony De Soyza, Amanda J. Hall, Eshwar Mahenthiralingam, Pavel Drevinek, Wieslaw Kaca, Zuzanna Drulis-Kawa, Stoyanka R. Stoitsova, Veronika Toth, Tom Coenye, James E. A. Zlosnik, Jane L. Burns, Isabel Sá-Correia, Daniel De Vos, Jean-Paul Pirnay, Timothy J. Kidd, David Reid, Jim Manos, Jens Klockgether, Lutz Wiehlmann, Burkhard Tümmler, Siobhán McClean, Craig Winstanley

Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen, especially in relation to cystic fibrosis. In this study a panel of 43 P.aeruginosa strains designed to reflect the diversity of this pathogen were collated.

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Canonical and non-canonical EcfG sigma factors control the general stress response in Rhizobium etli
Ann Jans, Maarten Vercruysse, Shanjun Gao, Kristof Engelen, Ivo Lambrichts, Maarten Fauvart, Jan Michiels

Summary: This work explores the hierarchical relation between Rhizobium etli extracytoplasmic function sigma factors ?EcfG1 and ?EcfG2, core components of the general stress response. The authors propose a modified model for general stress response regulation in R. etli as they find that, contrary to reports in other species, ?EcfG1 and ?EcfG2 act in parallel, as nodes of a complex regulatory network, rather than in series, as elements of a linear regulatory cascade. Based on a phylogenetic analysis and considering the prevalence of ?-proteobacterial genomes with multiple ?EcfG copies, this model may also be applicable to numerous other species. 

purple_lock_openMolecular analysis of the UV-inducible pili operon from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius
Marleen van Wolferen, Ma?gorzata Ajon, Arnold J. M. Driessen, Sonja-Verena Albers

Summary: This study is an in depth analysis of the UV inducible pili system of S. acidocaldarius which is used as a community based DNA repair system. Except for UpsX, all other components of the ups pili are essential for pili formation and DNA exchange.

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MicrobiologyOpen Publishes Issue 2:5

MicrobiologyOpenYou can read Issue 2:5 of MicrobiologyOpen online now!

MicrobiologyOpen is a broad scope, peer reviewed journal delivering rapid decisions and fast publication of microbial science.  The journal gives priority to reports of quality research, pure or applied, that further our understanding of microbial interactions and microbial processes.

Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis has highlighted the papers below from the latest issue as of particular interest:

purple_lock_openTusA (YhhP) and IscS are required for molybdenum cofactor-dependent base-analog detoxification
Stanislav G. Kozmin, Elena I. Stepchenkova and Roel M. Schaaper

Summary: We show that Escherichia coli mutants deficient in the sulfurtransferase TusA or the cysteine desulfurase IscS are hypersensitive to the toxic effects of the adenine analog 6-N-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). This sensitivity is similar to and epistatic with the HAP sensitivity of moa mutants, which defective in biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco). Our results suggest that TusA and IscS are critical for the insertion of the dithiolene sulfurs in Moco that coordinate the molybdenum atom.

purple_lock_openA mutation in the promoter region of zipA, a component of the divisome, suppresses the shape defect of RodZ-deficient cells
Daisuke Shiomi and Hironori Niki

Summary: We studied the mechanism by which a mutation in the promoter of zipA, which encodes a component of the cell division machinery, restores rod shape in RodZ-deficient E. coli cells. ZipA was slightly increased in the suppressor cells and led to a delay in cell division. Round-shaped rodZ mutants retained cell bipolarity, suggesting that a delay in the completion of septation may provide extra time to elongate the cell laterally.

purple_lock_openNitrogen regulation of protein–protein interactions and transcript levels of GlnK PII regulator and AmtB ammonium transporter homologs in Archaea
Laia Pedro-Roig, Christian Lange, María José Bonete, Jörg Soppa and Julie Maupin-Furlow

Summary: Here, we report that amtB-glnK operons are highly cotranscribed during conditions of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in Haloferax mediterranei. Furthermore, the GlnK PII regulatory proteins associate with AmtB-type transporters in the membrane of this archaeon after ammonia shock presumably to block ammonia uptake.

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MicrobiologyOpen Publishes its 100th Article!

MicrobiologyOpenMicrobiologyOpen has now published its 100th article! The journal published its first papers in January 2012 and since that time has accepted excellent papers across the broad scope of the journal, covering all aspects of Microbial Science. We are delighted by the success of this new open access journal. It was accepted for indexing in MEDLINE within its first year of publication.

The 100th article published in the journal is:

purple_lock_open TusA(YhhP) and IscS are required for molybdenum-cofactor-dependent base-analog detoxification
by Stanislav G. Kozmin, Elena I. Stepchenkova and Roel M. Schaaper
Summary: We show that Escherichia coli mutants deficient in the sulfurtransferase TusA or the cysteine desulfurase IscS are hypersensitive to the toxic effects of the adenine analog 6-N-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). This sensitivity is similar to and epistatic with the HAP sensitivity of moa mutants, which defective in biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco). Our results suggest that TusA and IscS are critical for the insertion of the dithiolene sulfurs in Moco that coordinate the molybdenum atom.

Visit the journal homepage to see our new landing page celebrating the MicrobiologyOpen 100! This highlights the top downloaded and top cited articles from within the first 100 papers, and also shows the geographical spread of our author base and the subject areas covered by the journal.

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MicrobiologyOpen Publishes Issue 2:3

MicrobiologyOpenYou can read Issue 2:3 of MicrobiologyOpen online now!

MicrobiologyOpen is a broad scope, peer reviewed journal delivering rapid decisions and fast publication of microbial science.  The journal gives priority to reports of quality research, pure or applied, that further our understanding of microbial interactions and microbial processes.

Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis has highlighted the papers below from the latest issue:

purple_lock_openTruncation of type IV pilin induces mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO579
T. Ryan Withers, F. Heath Damron, Yeshi Yin and Hongwei D. Yu

Summary: Schematic diagram of summarizing the induction of alginate production and mucoid conversion by PilA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO579. The sigma factor RpoN is required for transcription of pilA108 and algW. PilA108 is transported to the periplasm where it activates the periplasmic protease AlgW which proteolytically degrades the anti-sigma factor MucA releasing the sequestered sigma factor AlgU.

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A novel l-isoleucine-4?-dioxygenase and l-isoleucine dihydroxylation cascade in Pantoea ananatis
Sergey V. Smirnov, Pavel M. Sokolov, Veronika A. Kotlyarova, Natalya N. Samsonova, Tomohiro Kodera, Masakazu Sugiyama, Takayoshi Torii, Makoto Hibi, Sakayu Shimizu, Kenzo Yokozeki and Jun Ogawa

Summary: The genes encoding HilA and HilB from Pantoea ananatis AJ13355 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The culturing of E. coli cells expressing hilA (E. coli-HilA) or both hilA and hilB (E. coli-HilAB) in the presence of l-isoleucine resulted in the conversion of l-isoleucine into two novel biogenic compounds: l-4?-isoleucine and l-4,4?-dihydroxyisoleucine, respectively. In parallel, two novel enzymatic activities were detected in the crude cell lysates of the E. coli-HilA and E. coli-HilAB strains: l-isoleucine-4?-dioxygenase (HilA) and l-4?-hydroxyisoleucine-4-dioxygenase (HilB) activities, respectively.

purple_lock_openUbiquitination dynamics in the early-branching eukaryote Giardia intestinalis
Carlos A. Niño, Jenny Chaparro, Paolo Soffientini, Simona Polo and Moises Wasserman

Summary: Ubiquitation is an active and dynamic process in Giardia. Different types of ubiquitin modifications are present in this ancestral unicellular eukaryote and vary in terms of temporal and spatial distribution from trophozoites to cyst maturation. Using a proteomics approach, we identified around 200 high-confidence ubiquitinated candidates that vary their ubiquitination status during differentiation.

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Read Issue 2:2 of MicrobiologyOpen Now!

MicrobiologyOpenThe latest issue of MicrobiologyOpen is available online now! 12 new articles are fully open access: free to read, download and share.

Below are some recent top articles highlighted by the Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis:

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Summary: In this review, we synthesize the various methods available for topological mapping of ?-helical integral membrane proteins to provide investigators with a comprehensive reference for choosing techniques suited to their particular topological queries and available resources. 
 
purple_lock_openEmbRS a new two-component system that inhibits biofilm formation and saves Rubrivivax gelatinosus from sinking Anne Soisig Steunou, Sylviane Liotenberg, Marie-Noêlle Soler, Romain Briandet, Valérie Barbe, Chantal Astier and Soufian Ouchane 
 
Summary: Ability of the photosynthetic bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus to form biofilm. The EmbRS two-component system inhibits biofilm formation. Growth of the EmbRS mutant results in the formation of conspicuous bacterial veils around the toothpick scaffolds. 
 
 

MicrobiologyOpen Publishes Issue 2:1

MicrobiologyOpenThe latest issue of MicrobiologyOpen is available online now! 16 new articles are fully open access: free to read, download and share.

Below are some top articles highlighted by the Editor-in-Chief, Pierre Cornelis:

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Summary: In this article we provide the first genetic characterization of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) being able to make a living close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. To understand the fundamental biochemical and regulatory mechanisms behind syntrophic acetate oxidation, we identified the respective formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs), encoding a key enzyme of the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway used by these organisms under heterotrophic and syntrophic growth conditions. We further investigated fhs mRNA expression and analyzed the surrounding gene structures.
 
purple_lock_openSa-Lrp from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is a versatile, glutamine-responsive, and architectural transcriptional regulator Amelia Vassart, Marleen Van Wolferen, Alvaro Orell, Ye Hong, Eveline Peeters, Sonja-Verena Albers and Daniel Charlier
 
Summary: The Lrp-like regulator Sa-Lrp binds in a glutamine-dependent manner to AT-rich binding sites and induces bending and wrapping upon binding. Furthermore, by analyzing an Sa-lrp deletion mutant, we demonstrate that the protein affects transcription of some of the genes of which the promoter region is targeted and that it is an important determinant of the cellular aggregation phenotype. Therefore, Sa-Lrp is a glutamine-responsive global transcriptional regulator with an additional architectural role.
 
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Cell-free production of integral membrane aspartic acid proteases reveals zinc-dependent methyltransferase activity of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa prepilin peptidase PilD Khaled A. Aly, Emily T. Beebe, Chi H. Chan, Michael A. Goren, Carolina Sepúlveda, Shin-ichi Makino, Brian G. Fox and Katrina T. Forest
 
Summary:  The integral membrane aspartic acid protease PilD was synthesized in a cell-free translation system, as was its full-length substrate, PilA. The purified enzyme displayed both of its known biochemical activities: cleavage of the PilA signal peptide and S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methylation of the mature PilA. We show that PilD is a zinc binding protein, and zinc is required for the methylation activity but not the peptidase activity of PilD.
 
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Summary: The data strongly suggest that at least four transcription factors (AtfB,SrrA,AP-1, and MsnA) participate in the regulatory network that induces aflatoxin biosynthesis as part of the cellular response to oxidative stress in Aspergillus parasiticus.
 
 

Wiley signs Open Access Agreements with Helmholtz Association and University of Manitoba

Ten institutes of the Helmholtz Association and the University of Manitoba have signed up for Wiley Open Access Accounts.   These agreements provide active financial support and a streamlined process for authors to ensure open access to their published research in Wiley-Blackwell journals.  Authors affiliated with the Univesity of Manitoba and the institutes of the Helmholtz Association listed below can now benefit from these arrangements when publishing articles in Wiley Open Access journals.

Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung
Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum
Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt
Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE)
Forschungszentrum Jülich
GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

The University of Manitoba and the Helmholtz Association insitutions join a number of funders who have opened a Wiley Open Access Account since this was launched. Browse our listing to see the institutions / funders who have an account or partnership with Wiley Open Access.

More information about our open access options for funders and institutions can be found here.

MicrobiologyOpen Accepted for MEDLINE Indexing

MicrobiologyOpenWe are delighted to announce that MicrobiologyOpen has been accepted for indexing in MEDLINE. Coverage will begin from the first issue. This is fantastic news for the journal as it confirms its status as a quality publication across all areas of microbial science. This follows the news in 2012 that the journal has been included in PubMed and listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). MicrobiologyOpen has now published four issues and continues to receive high quality submissions.

To submit your paper to MicrobiologyOpen visit the online submission site >

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