Preprint manuscripts and servers in the era of coronavirus disease 2019

Abstract

Rationale, Aims, and Objectives

To both examine the impact of preprint publishing on health sciences research and survey popular preprint servers amidst the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID?19) pandemic.

Methods

The authors queried three biomedical databases (MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) and two preprint servers (MedRxiv and SSRN) to identify literature pertaining to preprints. Additionally, they evaluated 12 preprint servers featuring COVID?19 research through sample submission of six manuscripts.

Results

The realm of health sciences research has seen a dramatic increase in the presence and importance of preprint publications. By posting manuscripts on preprint servers, researchers are able to immediately communicate their findings, thereby facilitating prompt feedback and promoting collaboration. In doing so, they may also reduce publication bias and improve methodological transparency. However, by circumventing the peer?review process, academia incurs the risk of disseminating erroneous or misinterpreted data and suffering the downstream consequences. Never have these issues been better highlighted than during the ongoing COVID?19 pandemic. Researchers have flooded the literature with preprint publications as stopgaps to meet the desperate need for knowledge about the disease. These unreviewed articles initially outnumbered those published in conventional journals and helped steer the mainstream scientific community at the start of the pandemic. In surveying select preprint servers, the authors discovered varying usability, review practices, and acceptance polices.

Conclusion

While vital in the rapid dispensation of science, preprint manuscripts promulgate their conclusions without peer review and possess the capacity to misinform. Undoubtedly part of the future of science, conscientious consumers will need to appreciate not only their utility, but also their limitations.

New Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal takes collaborative approach to Open Access – About UBC Library

“Community members living in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) have been the focal point of countless scholarly research studies and surveys over the years. Up until recently, this research has remained largely out of reach to participants and community organizations, locked away in journals and other databases that require paid subscriptions to access. Community members have said they would benefit from access to that data for evaluating program and service effectiveness, for example, or for grant writing….

The recently launched Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal (DTES RAP), a project led by the UBC Learning Exchange in partnership with UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, is designed to change that.

The DTES RAP provides access to research and research-related materials relevant to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside through an easy-to-use public interface. The portal was developed in consultation with DTES residents and community organizations through focus groups and user experience testing, and in collaboration with a number of university units.  …”

Building the Mathematical Library of the Future | Quanta Magazine

“Every day, dozens of like-minded mathematicians gather on an online forum called Zulip to build what they believe is the future of their field.

They’re all devotees of a software program called Lean. It’s a “proof assistant” that, in principle, can help mathematicians write proofs. But before Lean can do that, mathematicians themselves have to manually input mathematics into the program, translating thousands of years of accumulated knowledge into a form Lean can understand.

To many of the people involved, the virtues of the effort are nearly self-evident….”

Georgia Knowledge Repository: Fueling Open Access | About GALILEO

“It’s Open Access Week, and we’re highlighting the Georgia Knowledge Repository.

Launched in September 2013, the Georgia Knowledge Repository is a digital archive that includes academic and intellectual works of Georgia’s colleges and universities. Its purpose is to highlight the scholarship of participating institutions (17), while also making these works available to Georgia residents.

Its goal fits with the universal idea of open access materials. The open access movement is centered on barrier free, online access to scholarly literature for the public. Through the GKR website, Georgians have easy access to thousands of free materials….”

https://wiki.lyrasis.org/display/samvera/Samvera+Connect+2020

“Samvera Connect (hashtag #samvera2020) is a chance for the Samvera Community to come together with an emphasis on synchronizing efforts, technical development, plans, and community links. This year, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has meant that we cannot meet face-to-face; instead we’re putting together an exciting, on-line event that we hope will capture many of the best bits that our in-person conference normally offers.  The meeting program is aimed at existing users, managers and developers and at new folks who may be just “kicking the tires” on Samvera and who want to know more. Samvera advertises this yearly conference with the slogan “as a Samvera Partner or user, if you can only make it to one Samvera meeting this academic year,  this is the one to attend!”  ”

Exploratory analysis of indicators for open knowledge institutions: a case study of Australian universities | hc:32623 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  While the movement for open access (OA) has gained momentum in recent years, there remain concerns about the broader commitment to openness in knowledge production and dissemination. Increasingly, universities are under pressure to transform themselves to engage with the wider community and to be more inclusive. Open knowledge institutions (OKIs) provide a framework that encourages universities to act with the principles of openness at their centre; not only should universities embrace digital OA, but also lead actions in cultivating diversity, equity, transparency and positive changes in society. Accordingly, this leads onto questions of whether we can evaluate the progress of OKIs and what are potential indicators for OKIs. As an exploratory study, this article reports on the collection and analysis of a list of potential indicators for OKIs. Data for these indicators are gathered for 43 Australian universities. The results show evidence of large disparities in characteristics such as Indigenous employment and gender equity, and a preference for repository-mediated OA across the Australian universities. These OKI indicators provide high-dimensional and complex signals that can be widely categorised into three groups of diversity, communication and coordination.

Ask the Community (and Chefs): How Can We Achieve Equitable Participation in Open Research? – Part 2 – The Scholarly Kitchen

In yesterday’s “Ask the Community (and Chefs)” post, most contributors acknowledged that some progress has been made, but we still have a long way to go. Today we continue to add the voices of Chefs and community members. Please add your own responses to the question in the comments.

Digital Repository Software Developer – METRO

“Located in New York City, the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) is a non-profit organization working to develop and maintain essential library services throughout New York City and Westchester County. The METRO membership consists of a diverse group of over 200 libraries, archives, and information organizations ranging from New York’s largest libraries to small community archives. METRO provides professional development and continuing education opportunities for our membership, in addition to digitization, metadata, and hosting services for digital collections.

METRO is seeking a highly motivated Software Developer/Software Engineer with demonstrable understanding of modern PHP code, an interest in cultural heritage and/or Open Science and ideally with prior experience developing Drupal 8/9 modules. We have architected and developed an innovative open source DAM/Digital repository system called Archipelago, and as part of the development team, you will have a chance to significantly contribute to this project, support our pre-existing stack and popular home-brewed software. You will also help our partners transition to our platform and participate in related digital GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums) initiatives constructed on top, on one side, or under it. Archipelago taps deeply into the marrow bone of Drupal 8/9 by implementing a different approach to data modelling that enables nearly infinite GLAM metadata and media workflows.  By running under innovative DevOps approaches and making use of JSON’s nimbleness, Archipelago is navigating the shifting technical landscape with real world LoD implementations, Natural Language Processing, complex data mangling, and graph traversing. Part of your work will include reflecting on our current roadmap and exploring how our existing code base can be improved upon. You will help us determine what code needs to be pruned, what parts need better documentation, and how we can leverage our community values like openness and inclusion to build better and just software systems. Reporting to the Assistant Director for Digital Strategy and Archipelago software architect, the successful candidate will work collaboratively with our team moving each code release forward, building new custom repositories and new features for our national and international partners….”

Creating More Visibility for Canadian Journals’ Self-Archiving Policies: An Open Access Week 2020 Crowdsourcing Project – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“Researchers frequently need to know where and when they can share a copy of their submitted, accepted and/or published journal articles in order to: meet the requirements of a funder policy, share their research more widely through their institutional repository or a subject repository, or, decide where to publish. Most frequently, they look up the journal in question using the Sherpa RoMEO tool. However, many Canadian journals are not yet reflected in this leading international database, and for those that are, the information contained there can be old or incomplete.

CARL is therefore asking Canadian librarians, researchers, and journals to help us collect key information about these missing and incomplete journal entries to make it easier for researchers in Canada and beyond to find Canadian scholarly publication venues using this tool….”