Can you Trust It? Using Open Access Materials in the Corporate World – Copyright Clearance Center

“How does the corporate researcher or library professional make sure that open access content is trustworthy? Here are some suggestions:’

Beyond the Paywall: Examining Open Access and Data Sharing Practices Among Faculty at Virginia Tech Through the Lens of Social Exchange

“The movement towards open access has allowed academic researchers to communicate and share their scholarly content more widely by being freely available to Internet users. However, there are still issues of concern among faculty in regards to making their scholarly output open access. This study surveyed Virginia Tech faculty (N = 264) awareness and attitudes toward open access practices. In addition, faculty were asked to identify factors that inhibited or encouraged their participation in open access repositories. Findings indicate that while the majority of Virginia Tech faculty are seeking to publish in open access, many are unaware of the open access services provided by the university and even less are using the services available to them. Time, effort, and costs were identified as factors inhibiting open access and data sharing practices. Differences in awareness and attitudes towards open access were observed among faculty ranks and areas of research. Virginia Tech will need to increase faculty awareness of institutional open access repositories and maximize benefits over perceived costs if there is to be more faculty participation in open access practices.”

 

Implementing open access mandates in Europe

“The implementation of open access policies in Europe is a socio-technical undertaking whereby a wide range of stakeholders work together to bring out the benefits of open access for European and global research. This work provides a unique overview of national awareness of open access in 32 European countries involving all EU member states and in addition, Norway, Iceland, Croatia, Switzerland and Turkey. It describes funder and institutional open access mandates in Europe and national strategies to introduce and implement them. An overview of the current European repository infrastructures is given, including institutional and disciplinary repositories, national repository networks, information portals and support networks. This work also outlines OpenAIREplus, a continuation project which aims to widen the scope of OpenAIRE by connecting publications to contextual information, such as research data and funding information. Opportunities for collaboration in order to achieve European and global synergies are also highlighted. The OpenAIRE project, a joint collaboration among 38 partners from 27 European countries, has built up a network of open repositories providing free online access to knowledge produced by researchers receiving grants from the European Commission or the European Research Council. It provides support structures for researchers, operates an electronic infrastructure and a portal to access all user-level services and works with several subject communities. Birgit Schmidt is affi liated with Goettingen State and University Library. Iryna Kuchma is affiliated with EIFL.”

Europe joins forces to create largest ever shared data repository for researchers | Horizon: the EU Research & Innovation magazine | European Commission

“World-leading research institutes have agreed to join forces with funding agencies and policymakers to create the European Open Science Cloud, the largest shared data repository in history.”

European Open Science Cloud, pilot project

“EOSCpilot Mission

Facilitating access of researchers across all scientific disciplines to data

Establishing a governance and business model that sets the rules for the use of EOSC

Creating a cross-border and multi-disciplinary open innovation environment for research data, knowledge and services

Establishing global standards for interoperability for scientific data…”

[1706.04185] Decentralized creation of academic documents using a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server

“Scholarly document creation continues to face various obstacles. Scholarly text production requires more complex word processors than other forms of texts because of the complex structures of citations, formulas and figures. The need for peer review, often single-blind or double-blind, creates needs for document management that other texts do not require. Additionally, the need for collaborative editing, security and strict document access rules means that many existing word processors are imperfect solutions for academics. Nevertheless, most papers continue to be written using Microsoft Word (Sadeghi et al. 2017). We here analyze some of the problems with existing academic solutions and then present an argument why we believe that running an open source academic writing solution for academic purposes, such as Fidus Writer, on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server could be a viable alternative.”

Got Open Access? – Green Tea and Velociraptors

“The last iteration of this post made the assumption that ‘gold’ Open Access meant you had to pay for it. I of all people should know that this is what  us English scientists call ‘pish-posh’. It turns out that in reality, around 70% of journals indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) have zero author-facing charges. So an APC of $0. Gold does not mean you shell out gold for it. It just means it’s Open Access at the point of publication….

If we, as a research community, self-archive en masse, several things could be potentially achieved.

  1. Global, democratic access to the research literature will become a reality for a very low cost;
  2. Subscriptions to publishers for our own research will be largely redundant as everything will be OA already;
  3. We create the basis for building tools, like Unpaywall, that can leverage the power of massive-scale access;
  4. We save $billions every year from university libraries that can be reinvested into our students and open scholarly infrastructure;
  5. We make the need for quasi-legal entities like SciHub and ResearchGate to become redundant.
  6. We make the world a better place for every single human being.”

Eprints in Library and Information Science e-LIS: new hosting, items and statistics ! | Agricultural Information Management Standards (AIMS)

“We are pleased to inform you that in May 2017, e-LIS : eprints in Library and Information Science migrated to a new hosting institution –  the Federico II University of Naples (Italy). In 2018 e-LIS will celebrate its 15th anniversary !  Library and information science (LIS) researchers, librarians, students and research institutions are invited to search, browse and participate by depositing their own work in e-LIS !

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