The European Union Promotes Open Access Amid Concerns Over Publishing Industry and International Policy Implications | Open Science

“As the European Commission seeks to obtain broad international support for its Plan S, such as in the United States, publishers may be significantly affected by the elimination of Open Access embargo periods on which Green and hybrid Open Access models critically depend for economic sustainability.”

Cambridge University Press issues public statement on Plan S | Cambridge University Press

“We fully endorse the benefits of open research and recognize the recent announcements about Plan S as an important contribution to the conversation about the ongoing transition.

There is a wide range of views about how to move forward with open research across different parts of the global academic community, which means the debate about how it should develop needs a process of wide consultation, as happened with the UK’s Finch report on open access six years ago.

We believe there are a number of specific developments which could help open research and its longer-term sustainability, including areas we have been working on such as:

1)    Wider adoption of new business models which have been put in place in some countries, particularly models allowing APC-free open access including read-and-publish deals;

2)    Improvements to the hybrid journal model to support academic communities where a full transition to open access isn’t yet possible;

3)    A community standard for a fair and balanced Green OA policy, with publishers supporting institutions to meet funders’ open access requirements;

4)  Ensuring academic freedom for researchers about where they can publish….”

FOAA Board recommendations for the implementation of Plan S

“ii. Define a clear transition path for hybrid journals to (Gold) OA. We suggest, in line with Stephan Kuster’s comment at the LERU meeting of October 2018, that to be compliant, the journal would need to be able to demonstrate it is transitioning within a 3-4 year period to fully gold OA by reporting on progress every year. iii. Provide clarity if and how green Open Access (OA) will be compliant. Green OA repositories seem to be endorsed only for preservation, not for OA itself. However, if compliant green OA is explicitly defined as unembargoed libre green OA, this is just as satisfactory as unembargoed libre gold OA, and this might incentivize publishers to hasten the transition of their journals to full gold OA. In this way, the value of repositories for OA itself can be acknowledged, not just for preservation and editorial innovation. iv. We strongly recommend that support for OA promised in Plan S infrastructure be public and open infrastructure, that is, platforms running on open-source software, under open standards, with open APIs for interoperability, owned or hosted by non-profit organizations. This should avoid infrastructure being acquired by large commercial publishers, which is a deliberate approach being taken to increase ownership of the whole scholarly communication ecosystem ….”

Publications Router is now interoperable with DSpace repositories | Jisc scholarly communications

“We’re very pleased to announce that Jisc’s Publications Router service is now available to institutions whose repositories use the DSpace platform.

When first launched as a service in 2016, Publications Router was set up to populate Eprints-based repositories as this was the most commonly-used repository platform here in the UK. More than 30 institutions receive data from Router to their Eprints systems today, but we have been keen to expand our reach to allow those which use the DSpace platform to enjoy the benefits of Router too. Now we’re happy to say that time has come and we’ve added our first users whose repositories run on DSpace….

The Publications Router service helps institutions capture into their repositories not only rich and accurate metadata describing articles published by their researchers but also in many cases the full text of the articles themselves in the version that can be exposed on a repository. This means that, as well as being alerted to their research outputs, institutions avoid the need to track down and upload the full text of articles – in many cases they arrive automatically and seamlessly straight into their systems. Subject to their review procedures, it is then a simple step for institutions to expose the articles publicly on their repositories….”

Choosing OA and getting tenure too

“A new initiative we are working on, the Maine Intellectual Commons, is exploring this question. One of our University of Maine colleagues, Harlan Onsrud, has recommended re-writing the tenure review criteria to favor open access publications over pay-for-access journals….Prioritizing open access publications is a hard thing to push through a university, however, because of all the bureaucratic hoops you have to negotiate, from the administration to the faculty senate to the unions. So Harlan suggested the short-term goal of simply re-writing the forms on which people submit their tenure applications. The top slots would be filled with open access categories. This would essentially not change the criteria but would make professors think twice when they realize that they do not have anything in these first four slots for open access books or articles.”

Opening Science with Institutional Repository: A Case Study of Vilnius University Library

Abstract:  The future strategies for opening science have become important to libraries which serve scientific institutions by providing institutional repository infrastructures and services. Vilnius University Library provides such an infrastructure for Vilnius University, which is the biggest higher education institution in Lithuania (with more than 20,200 students, 1,330 academic staff members, and 450 researchers ), and manages services and infrastructure of the national open access repository eLABa and the national open access data archive MIDAS. As the new platforms of these repositories began operating in the beginning of 2015, new policies and routines for organizing work with scientific publications and data had to be implemented. This meant new roles for the Library and librarians, too. The University Senate approved the new Regulations of the Library on 13 June 2017 with the task to develop the scholarly communication tools dedicated to sustaining open access to information and open science. Thus, Vilnius University Library performs the leading role in opening science by providing strategic insights and solutions for development of services dedicated to researchers, students and the public in Lithuania. As it was not presented properly at the international level before, this article presents the case of Vilnius University Library which actively cooperates with other Lithuanian academic institutions, works in creating and coordinating policies, conducts research on the improvements and services of eLABa and MIDAS, and suggests and implements the integral solutions for opening science.

Plan S coming soon (as of Sept 27, 2018)

“Regarding the ban on publishing OA in hybrid journals, last time we said we did not see the reason for it. A kind reader has pointed out that the Preamble actually addresses this issue. The reason is that using hybrids supports the subscription model. This makes it clear that Plan S is a full scale attack on the subscription model, which may make it a hard sell in the U.S., at least as long as the Republicans are in charge.

This leads us to the first big confusion. Some OA experts argue that subscription journal articles made immediately available via a repository comply with Plan S.  One Coalition leader seems to support this, saying the Plan S does not distinguish gold OA from Green.

On the other hand, allowing this sort of green compliance supports the subscription model. If hybrid OA articles are ruled out because they support the subscription model, then by that reasoning green OA ought to be ruled out as well. Statements from other leaders seem to support this view.

In addition, the conditions under which a repository deposit might comply may be of a sort that most subscription publishers do not allow. This adds a significant degree of complexity to the case. Since this issue of green OA compliance is now well known it should be interesting to see just how the coming Plan S Coalition rules handle it (if they do).

Also on the hybrid front, there is supposed to be what the Coalition is calling a “transition period,” wherein hybrid OA articles are allowed to comply with Plan S. One leader says this is period likely to be 3 or 4 years.

There is some hubris in calling this a transition period, because it assumes that the subscription model will largely disappear by the end of the term. Thus the transition intended is to the end of subscriptions, perhaps where all the subscription journals flip to gold OA, or something like that. As we have said before, the relatively small number of articles that flow from Coalition member funding makes this a questionable scenario….”

Politique sur le libre accès aux publications des résultats de recherche à l’Université Laval (February 22, 2017)

From Google’s English:

“7.1 To achieve the objectives of the Policy, the University:

7.1.1 Encourages University members to consider the objectives of the Policy and to pay Corpus UL the Search results for which they are authors in any publication of these.
7.1.2 Promotes adherence to the principle of free access for as many members of the University as possible
through an information, communication and dialogue process.
7.1.3 Encourages University members to reserve their copyright with publishers to allow
free dissemination of Research Results in accordance with the provisions of the Policy.
7.1.4 Informs and supports members of the University in their efforts to pay the results of the
search in Corpus UL .
7.2 To achieve the objectives of the Policy, members of the University:
7.2.1 Validate with their publisher in collaboration with the Copyright Office of the University
Open Access Dissemination Requirements for Search Results in Corpus UL .
7.2.2 Submit Research Results when accepted for publication in the format
provided by the Library….”

Open Access Policy KU Leuven – Research

“KU Leuven promotes Green Open Access – that is, providing Open Access at no cost, not to the reader, not to the author.

KU Leuven does not oblige Open Access. KU Leuven mandates the provision of a full text with each journal article published since 29/05/2018 in its repository, Lirias.

From 29/05/2018 onwards all journal articles submitted (accepted/published) or claimed in Lirias 2.0. need to be accompanied by a full text copy of the article….”

Open and Shut?: “It is for publishers to provide Plan S-compliant routes to publication in their journals.”

“The problem right now, however, is that there is too little information on how Plan S would work in practice. This means it is nigh impossible for informed commentary to take place, and we are seeing frequent calls for clarification.

On 12th September, therefore, I invited Smits to do an interview with me, in the hope that he could provide that clarification. I suggested we do this either by telephone or email. Smits agreed and said he would prefer to do it by email. So, I emailed him a list of questions and waited for his replies. These arrived on Monday this week.  …”