“Building and Using Digital Libraries for ETDs” by Edward A. Fox

“Despite the high value of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs), the global collection has seen limited use. To extend such use, a new approach to building digital libraries (DLs) is needed. Fortunately, recent decades have seen that a vast amount of “gray literature” has become available through a diverse set of institutional repositories as well as regional and national libraries and archives. Most of the works in those collections include ETDs and are often freely available in keeping with the open-access movement, but such access is limited by the services of supporting information systems. As explained through a set of scenarios, ETDs can better meet the needs of diverse stakeholders if customer discovery methods are used to identify personas and user roles as well as their goals and tasks. Hence, DLs, with a rich collection of services, as well as newer, more advanced ones, can be organized so that those services, and expanded workflows building on them, can be adapted to meet personalized goals as well as traditional ones, such as discovery and exploration.

 

 

 

Continuing the open access transition in 2021 and beyond | Advancing Discovery | Springer Nature

“However, for those of us committed to accelerating the transition to immediate gold OA, 2021 has come with a new challenge – the introduction by cOAlition S of its Rights Retention Strategy (RRS) and its  determination that zero-embargo green OA be used as an alternative to gold OA.  As we have made clear from the outset in our Plan S submission and contributions to blogs and letters, seeking to assert a prior CC BY licence on the accepted manuscript (AM) version of an article risks undermining the transition to immediate open access to the version of record, a goal we had thought cOAlition S shared with us.  This RRS/zero-embargo green OA approach forces publishers into defending subscription income since this is the only income available to pay for their per article costs. Further, this RRS/zero-embargo green OA approach has introduced significant confusion for authors with the priority it gives zero embargo green OA even if a journal provides a compliant immediate OA option for the version of record….”

The evolving role of preprints in the dissemination of COVID-19 research and their impact on the science communication landscape

Abstract:  The world continues to face a life-threatening viral pandemic. The virus underlying the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused over 98 million confirmed cases and 2.2 million deaths since January 2020. Although the most recent respiratory viral pandemic swept the globe only a decade ago, the way science operates and responds to current events has experienced a cultural shift in the interim. The scientific community has responded rapidly to the COVID-19 pandemic, releasing over 125,000 COVID-19–related scientific articles within 10 months of the first confirmed case, of which more than 30,000 were hosted by preprint servers. We focused our analysis on bioRxiv and medRxiv, 2 growing preprint servers for biomedical research, investigating the attributes of COVID-19 preprints, their access and usage rates, as well as characteristics of their propagation on online platforms. Our data provide evidence for increased scientific and public engagement with preprints related to COVID-19 (COVID-19 preprints are accessed more, cited more, and shared more on various online platforms than non-COVID-19 preprints), as well as changes in the use of preprints by journalists and policymakers. We also find evidence for changes in preprinting and publishing behaviour: COVID-19 preprints are shorter and reviewed faster. Our results highlight the unprecedented role of preprints and preprint servers in the dissemination of COVID-19 science and the impact of the pandemic on the scientific communication landscape.

 

 

 

Data Sharing and Equity: Sabrina McCutchan, Data Architect – Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog

“As a Data Architect, Sabrina is available to support DGHI in achieving their data sharing goals. She takes a holistic approach to identifying areas where the team needs data support. Considering at each stage of the project lifecycle how system design and data architecture will influence how data can be shared. This may entail drafting informed consent documents, developing strategies for de-identification, curating and managing data, or discovering solutions for data storage and publishing. For instance, in collaboration with CDVS Research Data Management Consultants, Sabrina has helped AMANI create a Dataverse to enable sharing restricted access health data for international junior researchers. Data from one of DGHI’s studies are also available in the Duke Research Data Repository….

 

Reproducibility is another reason that sharing and publishing data is important to Sabrina. DGHI wants to increase data availability in accordance with FAIR principles so other researchers can independently verify, reproduce, and iterate on their work. This supports peers and contributes to the advancement of the field. Publishing data in an open repository can also increase their reach and impact. DGHI is also currently examining how to incorporate the CARE principles and other frameworks for ethical data sharing within their international collaborations….”

FAIRsFAIR Repository Support Series – The role of Repositories in enabling Persistent Identifier (PID) Graphs

Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) play a central role in the FAIR ecosystem. PIDs enable the unique identification of digital entities and provide a way for us to refer to entities in a persistent way. The power of PIDs is amplified when they are connected with each other, creating a PID Graph. This webinar will dive into the concept of the PID Graph and their usefulness for repositories. You will hear about the PID Graph developments that have taken place in the context of the EOSC through the FREYA project as well as within the RDA Interest Group on Open Science Graphs for FAIR Data. Finally, the webinar will close with an outlook on the work being done to support PID Graphs and the ongoing and upcoming activities taking place in the FAIRsFAIR project.  This webinar is the first of our series to support repositories to become more FAIR-enabling.

 

Five stories showing how Europe PMC is used by the life sciences community – YouTube

“Europe PMC (https://europepmc.org/?) is an open science platform that enables access to a worldwide collection of life science publications. Watch this video and see how Europe PMC helps the scientific community to complete their everyday tasks. Read more on the blog post: https://bit.ly/2QnZqNu?. …”

PsychOpen CAMA

“PsychOpen CAMA enables accessing meta-analytic datasets, reproducing meta-analyses and dynamically updating evidence from new primary studies collaboratively….

A CAMA (Community Augmented Meta Analysis) is an open repository for meta-analytic data, that provides meta-analytic analysis tools….

PsychOpen CAMA enables easy access and automated reproducibility of meta-analyses in psychology and related fields. This has several benefits for the research community:

Evidence can be kept updated by adding new studies published after the meta-analysis.
Researchers with special research questions can use subsets of the data or rerun meta-analyses using different moderators.
Flexible analyses with the datasets enable the application of new statistical procedures or different graphical displays.
The cumulated evidence in the CAMA can be used to get a quick overview of existing research gaps. This may give an idea of which study designs or moderators may be especially interesting for future studies to use limited resources for research in a way to enhance evidence.
Given existing meta-analytic evidence, the necessary sample size of future studies to detect an effect of a reasonable size can be estimated. Moreover, the effect of possible future studies on the results of the existing meta-analytic evidence can be simulated.
PsychOpen CAMA offers tutorials to better understand the reasoning behind meta-analyses and to learn the basic steps of conducting a meta-analysis to empower other researchers to contribute to our project for the benefit of the research community….”

 

 

The open access advantage for studies of human electrophysiology: Impact on citations and Altmetrics – ScienceDirect

“Highlights

• Barriers to accessing science contributes to knowledge inequalities

• 35% of articles published in the last 20 years in electrophysiology are open access.

• Open access articles received 9–21% more citations and 39% more Altmetric mentions.

• Green open access (author archived) enjoyed similar benefit as Gold open access.

• Studies of human electrophysiology enjoy the “open access advantage” in citations….”

 

Joint Position Statement on “Data Repository Selection – Criteria That Matter” | Zenodo

Abstract:  Over the past three years, “Data Repository Selection-Criteria That Matter” – “a set of criteria for the identification and selection of those data repositories that accept research data submissions” – were developed by a group of publishers facilitated by the FAIRsharing initiative. Throughout this time, a large number of organizations and individuals have formulated responses and expressed concern about the criteria and the process through which the criteria were developed. Collectively, our organizations consider that the “Data Repository: Selection Criteria that Matter” recommendations – as currently conceived – will act as an impediment to achieving these aims. As such, we are issuing this Joint Position Statement to highlight the community’s concerns and request that the authors of these criteria respond with specific actions.