New Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal takes collaborative approach to Open Access – About UBC Library

“Community members living in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) have been the focal point of countless scholarly research studies and surveys over the years. Up until recently, this research has remained largely out of reach to participants and community organizations, locked away in journals and other databases that require paid subscriptions to access. Community members have said they would benefit from access to that data for evaluating program and service effectiveness, for example, or for grant writing….

The recently launched Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal (DTES RAP), a project led by the UBC Learning Exchange in partnership with UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, is designed to change that.

The DTES RAP provides access to research and research-related materials relevant to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside through an easy-to-use public interface. The portal was developed in consultation with DTES residents and community organizations through focus groups and user experience testing, and in collaboration with a number of university units.  …”

Georgia Knowledge Repository: Fueling Open Access | About GALILEO

“It’s Open Access Week, and we’re highlighting the Georgia Knowledge Repository.

Launched in September 2013, the Georgia Knowledge Repository is a digital archive that includes academic and intellectual works of Georgia’s colleges and universities. Its purpose is to highlight the scholarship of participating institutions (17), while also making these works available to Georgia residents.

Its goal fits with the universal idea of open access materials. The open access movement is centered on barrier free, online access to scholarly literature for the public. Through the GKR website, Georgians have easy access to thousands of free materials….”

Exploratory analysis of indicators for open knowledge institutions: a case study of Australian universities | hc:32623 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  While the movement for open access (OA) has gained momentum in recent years, there remain concerns about the broader commitment to openness in knowledge production and dissemination. Increasingly, universities are under pressure to transform themselves to engage with the wider community and to be more inclusive. Open knowledge institutions (OKIs) provide a framework that encourages universities to act with the principles of openness at their centre; not only should universities embrace digital OA, but also lead actions in cultivating diversity, equity, transparency and positive changes in society. Accordingly, this leads onto questions of whether we can evaluate the progress of OKIs and what are potential indicators for OKIs. As an exploratory study, this article reports on the collection and analysis of a list of potential indicators for OKIs. Data for these indicators are gathered for 43 Australian universities. The results show evidence of large disparities in characteristics such as Indigenous employment and gender equity, and a preference for repository-mediated OA across the Australian universities. These OKI indicators provide high-dimensional and complex signals that can be widely categorised into three groups of diversity, communication and coordination.

Creating More Visibility for Canadian Journals’ Self-Archiving Policies: An Open Access Week 2020 Crowdsourcing Project – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“Researchers frequently need to know where and when they can share a copy of their submitted, accepted and/or published journal articles in order to: meet the requirements of a funder policy, share their research more widely through their institutional repository or a subject repository, or, decide where to publish. Most frequently, they look up the journal in question using the Sherpa RoMEO tool. However, many Canadian journals are not yet reflected in this leading international database, and for those that are, the information contained there can be old or incomplete.

CARL is therefore asking Canadian librarians, researchers, and journals to help us collect key information about these missing and incomplete journal entries to make it easier for researchers in Canada and beyond to find Canadian scholarly publication venues using this tool….”

Reacting to the unprecedented urgency of COVID-19 research at Harvard: DASH’s fast-tracking deposit program · Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

“This past March, the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) launched a program to facilitate the rapid release of Harvard’s COVID-19 research. Under this program, authors submit coronavirus-related papers to DASH, Harvard’s open-access institutional repository, where they are expedited, or “fast-tracked,” through the standard workflow. Now, seven months on, this program has successfully distributed a collection of vital research open-access to a global audience….

Fast-tracking COVID-19 was a simple program to implement, for both OSC staff and authors. Leveraging current DASH submission tools, authors deposit their work to DASH as they normally would. After deposit, authors contact OSC staff to request a fast-track. OSC then expedites the deposit and makes it public in DASH, typically within a few hours….

As of October, 2020, over 30 COVID-19-related works have been fast-tracked in DASH over the past seven months. These works have seen over 400,000 downloads from readers across the globe; DASH had more than one million downloads in the month of June 2020, the repository’s best download month ever, due in part to the COVID-19 fast-track program. Our first fast-tracked paper, by Dr. Marc Lipsitch, registered over 21,000 readers during its first four days on DASH….”

Digital curation practices in institutional repositories in South India: a study | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the digital curation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in South India. Design/methodology/approach A voluntary survey was conducted among the IR managers of 23 South Indian IRs, and the response rate was 87%. Findings This study found that the active participation of South Indian IRs was only seen in a few digital curation activities. However, of the 33 digital curation activities analyzed, the active participation of repositories was only seen in ten digital curation activities. The performance of preservation activities was extremely low, and disagreements were recorded by the survey participants toward several digital curation activities. The most disagreed digital curation activities were emulation and cease data curation. All the participants had assigned metadata and allowed file downloads in their repositories. Raman Research Institute had provided a good number of digital curation services in their IR. Originality/value This is an in-depth study investigating the digital curation practice currently underway in South Indian IRs, and the researcher could not find similar studies in this niche.

2020 Northeast Institutional Repository Day | Northeast Institutional Repository Day (NIRD)

“Save the date! The Northeast Institutional Repository Day 2020 (NIRD20) Program Committee is pleased to announce the second annual Northeast Institutional Repository Day, a free event that brings together all in the Northeast (and beyond!) who manage or are interested in institutional repositories, digital collections, and digital preservation. We are platform agnostic and the conference will cover a variety of repository-related topics….

NIRD20 is a virtual event and will feature a keynote from Martha Whitehead, Vice President for the Harvard Library and University Librarian, and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Martha is a member of the Executive Board of COAR, the Confederation of Open Access Repositories….”

Open Letter to the American Society of Criminology Concerning Access to Its Journals: Make It Legal for Authors to Immediately, Publicly Share the Accepted Version of Their Manuscripts · Criminology Open

“We are writing with respect to the American Society of Criminology’s journals, Criminology: An Interdisciplinary Journal, and Criminology & Public Policy.undefined Their self-archiving policy prohibits authors from sharing the accepted version of their manuscripts, or “postprints,”undefined for a period of 24 months on all publicly accessible websites.

This policy is in conflict with the Society’s Purpose & Objective and Code of Ethics. It directly opposes free and open access to knowledge; hinders the study of crime and social control; impedes exchange and cooperation among stakeholders; shrinks the forum for disseminating criminological knowledge; thwarts public discourse on findings and dissemination of them; and, forbids a key countermeasure to social injustice. 

Therefore, we ask the Society to revise the journals’ self-archiving policy. It should be legal for their authors to immediately share their postprints on any website….” 

Opening Your Scholarship: Why should I DASH and Dataverse?

“Learn practices and platforms to achieve your open access goals!

Highlights on Harvard DASH and Dataverse.

Panelists:

– Sonia Barbosa, Manager of Data Curation, Harvard Dataverse, Manager of the Murray Research Archive

– Julie Goldman, Research Data Services Librarian

– Colin Lukens, Senior Repository Manager, Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

– Katie Mika, Data Services Librarian …”

The Global Pandemic and Scholarly Societies – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The AMS recently joined a collective of societies large and small, called the Society Publishers’ Coalition. This has already been a huge success, with societies of all stripes sharing what is on their mind and exploring collective action on areas of agreement. Most societies in this group are worried about what will transpire over the next few years. Those partnered with corporate publishers are hearing little other than positive generalizations about what the future for their revenues may look like, and would really like to see a clearer set of predictions and more transparency. Several society publishers have embarked on ambitious transformative open access (OA) agreements, and yet there is discussion in the winds questioning how sustainable large deals may be when the ability of larger institutions to support other institutions through such deals may not continue. Perhaps a silver lining here is that for societies with reasonably priced essential content, this may be where institutions focus their spend. What does this mean for OA models? Will the pandemic push us towards green OA? Will article processing charges (APCs) become harder to sustain? At the AMS, our approach is to look to Diamond OA for a new broad-based math journal, Communications of the AMS, launching in 2021 and funded by an AMS donor, but we realize that this is not an option open to all society publishers….”