Sharing your work by self-archiving: encouragement from the Journal of the Medical Library Association | Goben | Journal of the Medical Library Association

Abstract:  Self-archiving offers opportunities for authors to more broadly disseminate their work—both in pre-print form before its submission to a journal and in post-print form after its acceptance and publication in a journal. This editorial provides authors with guidance in navigating the rapidly changing options for self-archiving and affirms that the Journal of the Medical Library Association encourages authors to self-archive their work to boost its reach and impact.

 

Is overlay peer review the future of scholarly communications? – COAR

“You may have seen the paper published recently by COAR presenting a distributed framework for open publishing services called Pubfair (version 2, after community input), also available in Spanish.

Pubfair is a conceptual model for a modular, distributed open source publishing framework, which builds on the content contained in the network of repositories to enable the dissemination and quality-control of a range of research outputs including publications, data, and more. 

This idea is not new. It is based on the vision outlined in the COAR Next Generation Repositories report  and builds on earlier conceptual models developed by Paul Ginsparg, Herbert Van de Sompel and others. And there are already overlay journals on arXiv, such as Discrete Analysis and Advances in Combinatorics, and other platforms such as Episcience in France, that demonstrate that this can be done at a very high level of quality, for a low price.

We are proposing to expand on these initiatives by developing a highly distributed architecture for overlay services. With decentralization, comes tremendous power. It takes us beyond an environment with many silos, in which every organization maintains its own separate system; to a global, interoperable architecture for scholarly communication. This model can scale; respond to different needs and priorities related to language, region, and domain; and has the potential to set free scholarly communications….”

v31#5 Optimizing Library Services — Institutional Repositories and Knowledge Curation: Revisiting Knowledge Conversion in the Academic Environment – Against the Grain

“Institutional repositories are vital to knowledge curation in the digital environment, and the discussion of knowledge conversion has presented a systematic view of the roles IRs have in creating and sharing knowledge through digital technology.  Knowledge conversion is a knowledge curation process allowing researchers, teaching faculty, administrators, staff, donors (of special collections and archival records), interviewees (in oral histories), cultural informants (in ethnography and folklore) to share data, information, and knowledge with a wider audience in a variety of ways known to academics and practitioners in the business community and various industries.  There is, however, a vast epistemological ground in the social sciences (e.g., anthropology, ethnography) and the humanities (e.g., philosophy, history) where knowledge creation does not rely on curation technologies (such as IRs). In fact, authors may decide to curate their own works in their institutional repositories well after publishing in a formal venue such as a journal, conference proceeding, or book chapter. The use of the IR represents interests related to historical reflection and preservation, which is where finalized reports and data are available for viewing and further study.  Knowledge curation through the IR further supports collaboration across organizational units that have relied for very long on data silos and departmental databases.”

From Meow to ROAR: Expanding Open Access Repository Services at the University of Houston Libraries

Abstract. INTRODUCTION The rapidly changing scholarly communication ecosystem is placing a growing premium on research data and scholarship that is openly available. It also places a growing pressure on universities and research organizations to expand their publishing infrastructures and related services. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM To embrace the change and meet local demands, University of Houston (UH) Libraries formed a cross-departmental open access implementation team in 2017 to expand our open access repository services to accommodate a broad range of research products beyond electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The result of this effort was the Cougar Research Open Access Repositories (Cougar ROAR), a rebranded and expanded portal to the UH Institutional Repository, and the UH Dataverse, which disseminates the full range of scholarly outputs generated at the University of Houston. This article describes the team’s phased activities, including internal preparation, a campus pilot, rebranding, and a robust outreach program. It also details the team’s specific tasks, such as building the Cougar ROAR portal, developing ROAR policies and guidelines, enhancing institutional repository functionality, conducting campus promotional activities, and piloting and scaling a campus-wide open access program. NEXT STEPS Based on the pilot project findings and the resulting recommendations, the team outlined key next steps for sustainability of the UH Libraries’ open access services: continuation of the campus CV service, establishment of campus-wide OA policy, further promotion of Cougar ROAR and assessment of OA programs and services, and investment in long-term storage and preservation of scholarly output in Cougar ROAR.

Open Access Policy – Open Access – LibGuides at University of Lethbridge

“3.1. University Authors are encouraged to provide the University of Lethbridge Library an electronic copy of the finalized text of all scholarly articles. The electronic copy shall be provided to the University of Lethbridge Library (opus.library@uleth.ca) prior to the date of its publication.

3.2. University Authors grant the University of Lethbridge the non-exclusive permission to permanently archive, preserve, reproduce and openly disseminate, in any medium1, all scholarly articles authored by the University Author, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the University Authors; this permission is granted for the sole objective of archiving the articles for non-commercial purposes. Permission is granted on the understanding that University Authors will not be charged any use or service fees for activities associated with this Policy….”

v31#5 The Once and Future IR Agenda: Resolving the Dialectic Aims of Institutional Repositories – Against the Grain

“In our 2016 work, Making Institutional Repositories Work, Callicott, Scherer, and I drew a distinction between institutional repositories and institutional repository initiatives.  The former referred to the technical infrastructure of the repository itself, while the latter referred to the holistic suite of infrastructure and services “intended to support the preservation and organization of, and access to, the intellectual output of the institution in which they [institutional repositories themselves] were housed” (XV).  In the forward to the book and in subsequent publications, Clifford Lynch and subsequently Scott Plutchak identify the yet unresolved dialectical aims of institutional repositories.  By which, they refer to the tension between repositories as vehicles for Green OA, and repositories as platforms to augment the scholarly record by hosting non-traditional research outputs.  Both Lynch and Plutchak challenge the former in support of the latter.  Our book consisted of case studies and practitioner observations and, as such, largely discussed the ways in which IRs have enabled green OA.

This practitioner thinks that IR support for the green OA movement has been impactful, and while I am inclined to agree that the future of IRs is best represented by hosting and preserving new forms of scholarship, I do think they can and should continue to support green OA.  To that end, I would like to encourage us to think of the dialectical aims of institutional repositories in a Hegelian sense, which is to say not as thesis and antithesis in static opposition to one another, but as an interplay of movement between the two which reveals them to be interdependent parts of a whole.  In this way, we can continue with a conceptualization of institutional repositories as locally-based networked suites of both services and infrastructure, rather than singularly-focused platforms aimed at promoting either Green OA or augmenting the scholarly record. Thinking of repositories in this way encourages further diversification of the scholarly communication ecosystem in terms of both types of scholarly outputs, and versions of traditional outputs….”

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

CARL Releases Report on Institutional Repository Statistics Tracking – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the first report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this first report focuses on approaches to institutional repository (IR) statistics tracking.

Institutional Repository Statistics: Reliable, Consistent Approaches for Canada was written by Will Roy (Queen’s University), Brian Cameron (Ryerson University), and Tim Ribaric (Brock University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group for Standards for IR Usage Data.

This task group undertook an information-gathering exercise to better understand both the existing practices of Canadian repositories and the emerging tools and processes available for repositories to track and monitor usage more effectively. This report also presents recommendations on how to collectively achieve reliable and comparable statistics across all Canadian repositories….”

CARL Releases Report on Institutional Repository Statistics Tracking – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the first report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this first report focuses on approaches to institutional repository (IR) statistics tracking.

Institutional Repository Statistics: Reliable, Consistent Approaches for Canada was written by Will Roy (Queen’s University), Brian Cameron (Ryerson University), and Tim Ribaric (Brock University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group for Standards for IR Usage Data.

This task group undertook an information-gathering exercise to better understand both the existing practices of Canadian repositories and the emerging tools and processes available for repositories to track and monitor usage more effectively. This report also presents recommendations on how to collectively achieve reliable and comparable statistics across all Canadian repositories….”