Vernehmlassungsantwort zum Entwurf des Urheberrechtsgesetzes – Parldigi – Digitale Nachhaltigkeit

From Google’s English: “The Parliamentary Group on Digital Sustainability (Parldigi) is committed to the sustainable and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and calls for unrestricted public access to knowledge….The open access strategies of the universities serve not only to science, but also to the general public, and enable access and the long-term preservation of knowledge. However, Open Access can only be implemented in a targeted manner if (scientific) works can actually be published freely accessible. The Swiss Code of Obligations (OR) provides that the rights of the copyright holder are only transferred to the publisher for as long as it is necessary for the execution of the publishing contract (Article 381 para 1 OR). However, this provision may be amended by contract. As a rule, the publishers make use of this possibility by transferring copyrights in standard contracts or general terms and conditions (GTC) in full. In order to prevent this in the future and thus ensure that scientific publications can be made freely accessible to the interested public, a new, compelling provision is to be introduced in the framework of the revision of the URG. Concretely, we propose to supplement Art. 381 OR with the following paragraph:

Art. 381 para. 2 OR (new): 

The right to make a publicly funded contribution for a scientific journal or a scientific collection free of charge may be made available to the publisher. …”

Ubiquity Press to Pilot Open Source Repository Services

“We’re excited to announce that we are expanding our commitment to open access by providing hosted repositories. Starting in January 2018, we will be piloting two full-featured repository systems: Hyku and Invenio. Hyku is community-developed as a turnkey Samvera application and Invenio is developed by CERN. Our repositories will be open source, cloud-based, and fully integrated with our publishing and conference systems.”

Ubiquity Press

“Hyku and Invenio. Hyku is community-developed as a turnkey Samvera application and Invenio is developed by CERN. Both systems are modern, attractive and well-suited for both traditional and non-traditional content. Bring together your theses, articles, research data, and software under one high-quality repository….All repositories we host will be fully open source. We guarantee to transfer the entire installation to a host of your choice if you decide to switch platforms. …”

The Good News: You Can Download Hawking’s PhD For Free; The Bad News: It Took 50 Years To Make It Happen | Techdirt

“Techdirt has been writing about the (slow but steady) rise of open access for a decade. That’s as long as the Annual International Open Access Week has been running. Cambridge University came up with quite a striking way to join in the celebrations: Stephen Hawking’s PhD thesis, ‘Properties of expanding universes’, has been made freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world, after being made accessible via the University of Cambridge’s Open Access repository, Apollo. The 1966 doctoral thesis by the world’s most recognisable scientist is the most requested item in Apollo with the catalogue record alone attracting hundreds of views per month. In just the past few months, the University has received hundreds of requests from readers wishing to download Professor Hawking’s thesis in full. The idea has been quite a hit — literally, since the demand for Hawking’s thesis was so great on Monday, that it hit the Apollo server hard enough to take it offline for a while. The Guardian reported:”

DPubS Home

“DPubS (Digital Publishing System) is an open-source software system designed to enable the organization, presentation, and delivery of scholarly journals, monographs, conference proceedings, and other common and evolving means of academic discourse. DPubS was conceived by Cornell University Library to aid colleges and universities in managing and disseminating the intellectual discoveries and writing of scholars and researchers. 

 

Since no two electronic publishers’ needs are alike, DPubS was developed to be uniquely customizable. Its modular architecture provides flexibility—the system can be extensively customized to meet local needs. Because it has abundant Web-presentation capabilities, the presentation of each publication can be individually tailored, allowing for creative branding opportunities. Publishers can configure DPubS to deliver full-text content as well as to accept metadata in any file format. Publishers can also set the access controls to support subscription, open-access, or pay-per-view options and can configure DPubS to interoperate with institutional repositories such as Fedora. Finally, DPubS was designed to be extensible and scalable to support various publishing environments….”

Oxford OpenOUP supports Open Access — Steemit

“Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission.

 

A proven track record of success

 

OUP has been publishing OA content since 2004. Since that time, ‘gold’ OA has grown dramatically and proven effective in some disciplines. For example, Nucleic Acids Researchmoved from a subscription publication to an OA model in 2005 and has gone from strength to strength, earning its highest impact factor ever in 2013.

 

We have also successfully launched or taken over high-quality OA titles, including: Genome Biology and Evolution, Journal of Legal Analysis,Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, and Database.

 

OUP facilitates green OA either by allowing authors to deposit versions of their manuscripts in institutional or subject repositories after a specified time period, or depositing the version of record on their behalf….”

Welcome to Louisiana Digital Library | Louisiana Digital Library

“The Louisiana Digital Library (LDL) is an online library of more than 144,000 digital items from Louisiana archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories, making unique historical treasure accessible to students, researchers, and the general public in Louisiana and across the globe. The items in the Louisiana Digital Library are as diverse and interesting as the people and places in Louisiana, with photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more documenting the state’s history and culture….”

Impact of Social Sciences – The next stage of SocArXiv’s development: bringing greater transparency and efficiency to the peer review process

“Almost 1,500 papers have been uploaded to SocArXiv since its launch last year. Up to now the platform has operated alongside the peer-review journal system rather than seriously disrupting it. Looking ahead to the next stage of its development, Philip Cohen considers how SocArXiv might challenge the peer review system to be more efficient and transparent, firstly by confronting the bias that leads many who benefit from the status quo to characterise mooted alternatives as extreme. The value and implications of openness at the various decision points in the system must be debated, as should potentially more disruptive innovations such as non-exclusive review and publication or crowdsourcing reviews.”