How scientists can comply with the H2020 open access mandate through self archiving | ilSarrett

“Very short version

  1. (optional) When you submit your article to a journal, upload that pre-print non-peer-reviewd version in a pre-print repository of your choice (e.g. Zenodo, MarXiv, …) with a CC-BY licence.
  2. When your article has been accepted, upload that post-print peer-reviwed version  in MarXiv (with the licence required by the publisher; e.g. it could be a CC-BY-NC-ND licence)
  3. Wait till the final paper is published in your selected journal.”

Shared research repository announcement – The British Library

“The British Library, working with a group of cultural and memory organisations, is piloting a shared repository service for research content built on an open source platform. The repository aims to increase the visibility and impact of research outputs, making the knowledge generated by cultural institutions easier to explore and use for new research.

The Library has appointed open access publisher Ubiquity Press to build the pilot repository. It will initially be populated with research outputs produced by the project’s partners, the British Museum, Tate, National Museums Scotland and MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), as well as the British Library’s own open research content….

The repository will be built using Samvera Hyku, a new, rapidly developing open source repository software in which multitenancy is a key feature. Hyku – developed initially in response to a call by the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a National Digital Platform – has a global developer community behind it who have made huge progress in a relatively short time….

Netherlands: VSNU Reaches Open Access Deal with Wolters Kluwer

“As part of its negotiations with Wolters Kluwer to extend the contract for legal and fiscal professional literature, the VSNU has agreed open-access terms. The 27 academic journals in Wolters Kluwer’s collection of otherwise mainly professional literature will be subject to new and explicit open-access embargo rules. The parties have agreed that academic articles from these 27 journals will be eligible for publishing in the public domain 6 to 12months after the date of their publication on Navigator and Wolters Kluwer’s other platforms.”

Open Access Digital Theological Library | a virtual library for theology, religious studies, and related disciplines

“The mission of Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL) is to curate high quality content in religious studies and related disciplines from publisher websites, institutional repositories, and stable public domain collections. The OADTL uses the world’s most advanced library discovery cataloging and discovery system, OCLC’s WorldShare, to make content easily discoverable and retrievable. The OADTL is staffed by professional librarians and curates content without regard for theological or confessional perspective. It is hoped that the increased access to high quality religious studies content will serve scholars and students of religion….”

How green is our valley?: five-year study of selected LIS journals from Taylor & Francis for green deposit of articles

Abstract:  This study reviews content from five different library and information science journals: Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian, Collection Management, College & Undergraduate Libraries, Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship and Journal of Library Administration over a five-year period from 2012–2016 to investigate the green deposit rate. Starting in 2011, Taylor & Francis, the publisher of these journals, waived the green deposit embargo for library and information science, heritage and archival content, which allows for immediate deposit of articles in these fields. The review looks at research articles and standing columns over the five years from these five journals to see if any articles were retrieved using the OA Button or through institutional repositories. Results indicate that less than a quarter of writers have chosen to make a green deposit of their articles in local or subject repositories. The discussion outlines some best practices to be undertaken by librarians, editors and Taylor & Francis to make this program more successful.

NIH 3D Print Exchange | A collection of biomedical 3D printable files and 3D printing resources supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“3D printing technology is advancing at a rapid pace, but it is difficult to find or create 3D-printable models that are scientifically accurate or medically applicable. The NIH 3D Print Exchange provides models in formats that are readily compatible with 3D printers, and offers a unique set of tools to create and share 3D-printable models related to biomedical science….

Creative Commons licenses can be applied to models submitted to our database. Read our licensing policy to find find out more information on permission, attribution, and how to choose a license….”