Guest Post – Assessing User Perceptions of an Open Access Subvention Fund – The Scholarly Kitchen

“After eight years of funding open access (OA) articles, University Libraries at Virginia Tech has a wealth of quantitative data on article processing charges (APC). However, we lacked qualitative information on authors’ perceptions about funding OA articles, how this funding supports research in specific disciplines, and how authors view OA publishing in general. Since the fund’s inception, the Library’s expenditures on APCs has increased over 500%, prompting us to ask authors about their perceptions of the Open Access Subvention Fund (OASF) as we consider its future development and sustainability….

In fall 2019 we conducted a survey of all the VT authors and co-authors who had requested APC support between August 2012 and October 2019….

As context for understanding respondents’ views on the OASF, we wanted to learn about their views on the value of OA publishing more generally. Overall the attitudes were positive (perhaps not surprising given that those receiving the survey were seeking funding to publish OA) but the nuances are useful to understand.

 

56% of respondents felt that OA publishing should be a positive factor in promotion and tenure (P&T) considerations. But, 58% said it had not been discussed by any P&T committee they served on.
63% of the respondents received no special recognition from their departments for publishing an OA article.
Only 20% of authors reported that they deposited their articles in VTechWorks (our institutional repository). This indicates they may not be aware of the added exposure that the repository could provide for their work. Or, they may believe that by publishing the work OA, there is no need to provide a duplicate a copy in VTechWorks. (Note: OASF-supported articles are deposited in VTechWorks by Scholarly Communication Department staff if the authors do not deposit them.)
Authors are spreading the word about the OASF to their colleagues. While the Library uses a number of communication channels to advertise the fund, word of mouth seems to be very  effective. Nearly 80% indicated that they passed on information they got from a Library session, and 49% of respondents said they learned about the fund from a colleague.
Authors report encouraging others to publish in OA journals, including colleagues at VT (37%) and other universities (20%), graduate students (34%), and occasionally undergraduate students (8%)….”

COAR Forum on COVID-19 and Open Science – COAR

“The forum will showcase several collaborative initiatives from around the world aiming to improve the discovery of and access to COVID-19 research outputs. Participants will learn about the critical need for open science in the time of the pandemic, new workflows and practices that can be adopted in you own local context, and identify possible areas of international collaboration.

OpenVirus is a joint UK-India, open repository-based project to extract multidisciplinary semantic knowledge about viral epidemics (including COVID-19) through analysing tens of thousands or articles we can find clues to predict/prevent/mitigate viral epidemics.

OpenAIRE COVID-19 Gateway is a portal that provides access to publications, research data, projects and software that may be relevant to the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19). The OpenAIRE COVID-19 Gateway aggregates COVID-19 related records, links them and provides a single access point for discovery and navigation.

Canadian COVID-19 Open Repository Initiative is a collaborative project led by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries to identify and make as many Canadian research outputs related to COVID-19 available through major discovery systems including the OpenAIRE COVID-10 Gateway….”

Accessibility in Institutional Repositories

“Report on findings from a survey conducted in Fall 2019 to gauge accessibility practices for digital content made available in institutional repositories. For the purpose of this study, we focus on the digital content collected in institutional repositories and workflows at academic libraries, rather than the websites and software platforms. This study is intended to establish a baseline measurement of current accessibility practices in hopes that studies such as this will help inform the wider community of the challenges and obstacles faced by institutional repository mangers and staff in ensuring accessibility to content.

Anonymized data from this survey is available in the Texas Data Repository. https://doi.org/10.18738/T8/LUGYPO …”

 

PhilArchive: The Philosophy E-Print Archive

“PhilArchive is the largest open access e-print archive in philosophy. Formerly known as the PhilPapers Archive, it is built on and integrated with the PhilPapers database. Access to items on PhilArchive is free without a user account. PhilArchive is a non-profit project supported by the PhilPapers Foundation.

PhilArchive consists entirely of articles submitted by users. You can contribute by submitting your work….”

Five Minutes with Professor Sonia Livingstone on the benefits of open access and institutional repositories. | Impact of Social Sciences

“I honestly don’t remember how it all began, though now depositing my research is second nature (and such a regular activity that I fear I burden the always-helpful library staff). I think I began with the documents that seemed to have no place but that I had worked hard on and so wanted to be able to point to on occasion.

What was great about depositing such documents was that I held copyright so they could be instantly accessible to anyone interested….

[Question:] Have you been surprised by how many downloads your research has received in LSERO? So far this year you have received over 86,000 downloads!

Astonished! What can I say? I work in a topical field (children and young people’s engagement with the internet), though I am encouraged that some of less topical work (e.g. on media audiences) also gets noticed through LSERO. I also work in a field that has fostered a constructive and lively dialogue between academics and stakeholders/publics. This leads me to another list – who do I imagine is the audience downloading on such a scale?

It might be academics in universities with nicely resourced libraries looking for a convenient source, and it might be my students (thanks guys!).
But I hope it is also academics in less well-resourced universities who wouldn’t otherwise have access to work that, once published, sits beyond a pay wall.
And I also believe (and hope) that it’s non-academics, whether policy makers or journalists or NGOs and other stakeholders who also lack access to academic journal publications and who don’t generally (like to or have budget for) purchasing academic work….”

Overlay model for peer review on repositories – open for public comment – COAR

“The resource-oriented nature of the Web is well suited to an environment which places value in the fact that control of resources is distributed across a large number of repositories. In such an environment, it makes sense to take a pass-by-reference approach to interaction between different networked services, rather than relying on machine or human mediated processes to pass copies of resources around the network.

 

Resources in repositories have stable URIs that can be used for referencing. This means that a request for review can be sent as a standards-based notification that carries a resource’s stable URI to the inbox of a review service. This also means that the review service can obtain the resource that is to be reviewed by visiting that stable URI. From there, the actual resource can be retrieved by following some simple standards-based navigational conventions (e.g., retrieve the full text of a preprint, automatically, from having accessed a landing page describing it). Generally, this means that it becomes possible to invoke and use remote services on the network, by passing instructions to them together with, crucially, URIs identifying particular resources.

This document presents some simple models and vocabularies for using standard notification protocols to achieve common interactions between repositories and overlay peer review services, based on the use cases provided….”

Checking Rights | Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship

Abstract:  Institutional repository (IR) managers often find themselves providing copyright guidance to faculty who wish to self-archive their published scholarship or to students depositing theses and dissertations. As IR managers may not be copyright experts themselves, making determinations and checking rights can be difficult and time-consuming. This article is intended as a practical guide to describe common types of material that can be placed in an IR as well as potential copyright issues and other considerations for each type. Material types covered include book chapters, journal articles, conference proceedings, student papers, electronic theses and dissertations, research data sets, historical and archival materials, and oral histories. Underlying issues such as copyright ownership, work made for hire, and the legal definition of publication are also discussed. For easier reference, the appendix contains a chart with brief descriptions of issues and resources.

 

Transformative Journals | The Company of Biologists

“The Company of Biologists’ three hybrid journals – Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology – have chosen the ‘transformative’ route towards Open Access.

As the first not-for-profit publisher to commit to the Transformative Journal approach, we are excited about this next step in our Open Access journey.

Our three journals are the very first to be listed by Coalition S as being Plan S compliant Transformative Journals.

We have offered Open Access publishing options since 2004 and two of our five journals are already fully Open Access. We believe that Open Access is the direction of travel and it is clear that, as well as reader benefits, Open Access provides our authors with a wider readership and higher usage for their articles.

The Transformative Journal strategy signals more clearly our commitment to move towards full Open Access, while allowing us to provide publishing options that support all our authors as we approach this change in the publishing landscape….”

Transformative Journals | The Company of Biologists

“The Company of Biologists’ three hybrid journals – Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology – have chosen the ‘transformative’ route towards Open Access.

As the first not-for-profit publisher to commit to the Transformative Journal approach, we are excited about this next step in our Open Access journey.

Our three journals are the very first to be listed by Coalition S as being Plan S compliant Transformative Journals.

We have offered Open Access publishing options since 2004 and two of our five journals are already fully Open Access. We believe that Open Access is the direction of travel and it is clear that, as well as reader benefits, Open Access provides our authors with a wider readership and higher usage for their articles.

The Transformative Journal strategy signals more clearly our commitment to move towards full Open Access, while allowing us to provide publishing options that support all our authors as we approach this change in the publishing landscape….”

Trends of Publications’ Citations and Altmetrics Based on Open Access Types | Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2020

This paper analyzes trends of citation and altmetrics with respect to different OA types (e.g., gold, hybrid, green). The analysis based on Unpaywall, Altmetric, and COCI shows that articles with a green license obtain more citations than other OA types. Regarding patents, hybrid, green, and bronze articles get more mentions compared to closed and gold articles. In terms of social media (e.g., Twitter and Facebook), bronze articles receive the most mentions.