Sophia Project – Online resources in philosophy and ethics

“Founded in 1999 by college educators, the Sophia Project is an online collection of original articles, primary source texts, and commentaries in the fields of philosophy and ethics designed to provide the newcomer to the discipline of philosophy with the resources necessary to read great philosophical works.  We believe that with the proper guidance almost any intelligent person can begin a life-long reading program in philosophy…and perhaps even become a bit wiser in the process….”

OPERAS – open access in the european research area through scholarly communication

“OPERAS is a distributed Research Infrastructure (RI) project for open scholarly communication. The main goal is to introduce the principle of Open Science and ensure effective dissemination and global access to research results in the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH)….”

Open Access, Books, and the Tricky Transition | School of Advanced Study

“The Third Research Excellence Framework, scheduled for the mid-2020s, now has a mandate for open access books. Despite calls from the digitally enlightened, however, most humanities long-form writing remains very much ensconced within the traditions and economics (both symbolic and financial) of the printed book. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of a migration from conventional books to an open access model and the range of approaches that are currently being taken.

In the age of data mining, distant reading, and cultural analytics, scholars increasingly rely upon automated, algorithm-based procedures in order to parse the exponentially growing databases of digitized textual and visual resources. While these new trends are dramatically shifting the scale of our objects of study, from one book to millions of books, from one painting to millions of images, the most traditional output of humanistic scholarship—the single author monograph—has maintained its institutional pre-eminence in the academic world, while showing the limitations of its printed format. Recent initiatives, such as the AHRC-funded Academic Book of the Future in the UK and the Andrew W. Mellon-funded digital publishing initiative in the USA, have answered the need to envision new forms of scholarly publication on the digital platform, and in particular the need to design and produce a digital equivalent to, or substitute for, the printed monograph. Libraries, academic presses and a number of scholars across a variety of disciplines are participating in this endeavour, debating key questions in the process, such as: What is an academic book?  Who are its readers? What can technology do to help make academic books more accessible and sharable without compromising their integrity and durability? Yet, a more fundamental question remains to be answered, as our own idea of what a ‘book’ is (or was) and does (or did) evolves: how can a digital, ‘single-author’ monograph effectively draw from the growing field of digital culture, without losing those characteristics that made it perhaps the most stable form of humanistic culture since the Gutenberg revolution? Our speakers will debate some of these questions and provide their points of view on some of the specific issues involved. After their short presentations, all participants are invited to bring their own ideas about, and experience with, digital publishing to the table.”

Greek and Latin Unleashed: Harvard Library’s Contribution to the Digital Humanities | Harvard Library

“The Open Greek and Latin Project (OGL) is an international collaboration working to bring free access to all source texts written in Classical Greek or Latin from antiquity to c. 600 CE, including manuscripts, papyri, epigraphs, ostraca (broken pieces of ceramic material used as ballots) and more.

In 2016, the Harvard Library and the Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies joined forces with Mount Allison University and the University of Virginia to help the OGL implement a proof of concept of the project, focusing on the first thousand years of Greek texts. Funding for the First Thousand Years of Greek component of the OGL came from the Harvard Library through a grant from the Arcadia Foundation and the generous support of the Center for Hellenic Studies. The OGL is led by Professor Gregory Crane, the Humboldt Professor of Computer Science at the University of Leipzig and Professor of Classics at Tufts University and Editor-in-Chief of the Perseus Project. All partners in the project are providing staff and technical support.

This funding is helping the OGL complete the digitization of Greek texts and create an easy-to-use but functionally rich user interface. This will allow researchers to access, search, download, modify, and redistribute textual data to explore new forms in areas such as born-digital annotation, reading practices, audiences for Greek and Latin, and avenues of research. While the design of the website is under development, scholars are accessing and using the texts from GitHub, the software development platform. …”

Learning to be open: Open Access as a deliberate academic practice – Futures

“I believe open access is the way to do right by one’s research and maintain the integrity of the work, as much as we’re doing right by society at large through our research. We need to also empower early-career academics to know exactly what control they have over their own work, and what can be done with it, and in making a principled decision about access to their research. These decisions need to be considered at the beginning of the research process already and not just at the end. Just as with any new mode of practice, open access has a learning curve that requires deliberate and purposeful practice, but pays off very quickly in terms of citations, research impact, and social impact. So the next time you have a paper waiting to be written, look up the open access options in your discipline. In the meanwhile, make sure to find the preprint copies of all your published papers and deposit them in your institutional repository.”

News from the MLA MLA Receives Grant for Humanities Commons

“The MLA has received a generous $309,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue its work on Humanities Commons. With support from the Mellon Foundation, the MLA will engage in a nine-month process of sustainability planning and governance-model development. In the course of the project, the MLA will bring together its existing society partners—the Association for Jewish Studies; the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; and the College Art Association—with a group of other interested societies to develop a strategic plan that can ensure the future of the interdisciplinary, nonprofit scholarly research network. Kathleen Fitzpatrick will continue to serve as project director of Humanities Commons in her new role at Michigan State University, and Terrence Callaghan, the MLA’s director of administration and finance, will oversee the project as the MLA’s principal investigator. The grant period will run through September 2018.”

Future of Open Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Insights from OASPA’s Twitter Chat – OASPA

On July 12th, 2017, OASPA hosted a Twitter chat with Caroline Sutton (Head of Open Scholarship Development at Taylor & Francis and member of the OASPA Board), Rebecca Kennison (Principal of K|N Consultants and the co-founder of the Open Access Network), Dr Jennifer Edmond (Research Fellow and Director of Strategic Projects for the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Trinity College Dublin and co-director of the Trinity Center for Digital Humanities) and Ron Dekker (Director of CESSDA). Our panelists answered questions from the Open Access community and the general public on the future of open scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and we were lucky to have a lively and wide-ranging discussion

The Open Commons of Phenomenology

“We are a non-profit, international scholarly association whose mission is to provide free access to the full corpus of phenomenology as well as to develop and maintain the digital infrastructure required for its curation, study and dissemination….A digital platform will host all texts, documents and images in open access, feature interactive contents and offer an extensive set of digital tools such as multi-text search, data visualisations, citation index, bibliometric statistics, annotations and social sharing….”