Survey of Academic Library Use of Open Access Materials

“This survey studies how colleges and universities use open access resources as a supplement to or replacement for academic journals and other materials. Although the primary focus of the report is on scholarly publishing, especially academic journals, some questions relate to other information vehicles such as textbooks, audio-visual resources and print books.

As a response to the COVID crisis many colleges and universities are turning to open access resources and this report gives highly detailed data on the extent of use of a broad range of specific open access resources including but not limited to Google Scholar, Google Books, LOCKSS, the Directory of Open Access Journals, PubMed Central,  arXiv, bioRxiv, MedRxiv, ResearchGate the Directory of Open Access Books, OAPEN, the Online Guide to Open Access Journals, PDQY, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, the Registry of Research Data Repositories, MedEdPortal, the Open Access Directory, OpenDOAR, the Free Music Archive, EBSCO Open Dissertations, Science.Gov, OpenStax, MERLOT, Lumen Learning, the Open Course Library, Boundless and Saylor Academy.

The report also looks at use of interlibrary loan, direct appeals to authors and at pirating sites such as Sci-Hub as ways to fulfill patron demand after subscription cancellations.  The study also gives detailed data on the use of, and perception of the skill level in using, digital object identifiers to track and find open access and other available free or low- cost materials. Study participants also comment on what they are doing to publicize open access resources to their patrons, and what training they are providing in their discovery and use.  

Just a few of the 132-page report’s many findings are that:

37% of those sampled turn to interlibrary loan as their first choice in replacing content to which they have lost access.

The Resource – Open Access Theses and Dissertations – was used very frequently by 5.71% of survey participants and frequently by 20%.

63% of US-based colleges and universities in the sample produced a guidebook, listserv or LibGuide on how to locate and use open access resources.”

Sharing Africa’s knowledge through open African research repositories | OER Africa

“Open licensing is used for many different kinds of resources – open educational resources (OER), open access research publishing, open data, and more broadly open science. This post discusses developments in access to African research information through repositories that use open licensing. All of the resources are freely available and usually carry a Creative Commons or equivalent license.

OER Africa’s open knowledge primer provides a background on basic concepts and their pertinence to African researchers. OER Africa has also created a Learning Pathway on publishing using open access, which defines terms and will help you acquire the skills necessary to publish or advise on publishing research using Open Access (OA).

Like their global counterparts, many African research institutions and universities are increasingly using open licensing to make their research available and visible globally. The number of open access repositories is growing so quickly that it is difficult to keep track of them. The UK International African Institute (IAI) maintains a list that is frequently updated. IAI, in collaboration with AfricarXiv, has created an interactive map of African digital research literature repositories. You can also search on Google or the search engine of your choice by entering the name of an institution or country and repository (though this would require you to know better what you are looking for).

University open access repositories collect student theses and dissertations, case studies, conference papers, and sometimes journal articles. There are also continent-wide repositories. Three are discussed below. One focuses on university research output; one is a pre-print service; and one is discipline specific….”

Sharing Africa’s knowledge through open African research repositories | OER Africa

“Open licensing is used for many different kinds of resources – open educational resources (OER), open access research publishing, open data, and more broadly open science. This post discusses developments in access to African research information through repositories that use open licensing. All of the resources are freely available and usually carry a Creative Commons or equivalent license.

OER Africa’s open knowledge primer provides a background on basic concepts and their pertinence to African researchers. OER Africa has also created a Learning Pathway on publishing using open access, which defines terms and will help you acquire the skills necessary to publish or advise on publishing research using Open Access (OA).

Like their global counterparts, many African research institutions and universities are increasingly using open licensing to make their research available and visible globally. The number of open access repositories is growing so quickly that it is difficult to keep track of them. The UK International African Institute (IAI) maintains a list that is frequently updated. IAI, in collaboration with AfricarXiv, has created an interactive map of African digital research literature repositories. You can also search on Google or the search engine of your choice by entering the name of an institution or country and repository (though this would require you to know better what you are looking for).

University open access repositories collect student theses and dissertations, case studies, conference papers, and sometimes journal articles. There are also continent-wide repositories. Three are discussed below. One focuses on university research output; one is a pre-print service; and one is discipline specific….”

Boost your University’s theses research impact and be part of the text and data mining movement

“Discover how other universities are amplifying their research at no cost and no additional effort. Two university leaders will share how they are supporting thesis authors to be a part of global research by broadening the impact of their university’s research. Through a free partnership with ProQuest that supports institutional goals and values, you will learn how to easily contribute to intensive text and data mining projects as well as how to see usage results that can improve institutional repository access.

Hear from industry leaders Fiona Greig, Director of Library & IT Services, University of Winchester, UK and Bruce Weinberg, Professor, Department of Economics, Ohio State University, U.S.A, on their experiences….”

From Open Access to Open Science: The Path From Scientific Reality to Open Scientific Communication – Christian Heise, Joshua M. Pearce, 2020

Abstract:  Although opening up of research is considered an appropriate and trend-setting model for future scientific communication, it can still be difficult to put open science into practice. How open and transparent can a scientific work be? This article investigates the potential to make all information and the whole work process of a qualification project such as a doctoral thesis comprehensively and freely accessible on the internet with an open free license both in the final form and completely traceable in development. The answer to the initial question, the self-experiment and the associated demand for openness, posed several challenges for a doctoral student, the institution, and the examination regulations, which are still based on the publication of an individually written and completed work that cannot be viewed by the public during the creation process. In the case of data and other documents, publication is usually not planned even after completion. This state of affairs in the use of open science in the humanities will be compared with open science best practices in the physical sciences. The reasons and influencing factors for open developments in science and research are presented, empirically and experimentally tested in the development of the first completely open humanities-based PhD thesis. The results of this two-part study show that it is possible to publish everything related to the doctoral study, qualification, and research process as soon as possible, as comprehensively as possible, and under an open license.

 

Institutional Repository Movement in Turkey and the case of Istanbul Aydin University

ANKOS (The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium) established Open Access and the institutional Repositories Working Group(OAIRWG) in order to raise awareness on Open Access (OA) and Institutional Repositories (IRs) among information Professionals in Turkey. Ankara University is one of the first Open Access initiatives in Turkey. Over seven hundred and fifty scientific papers produced by faculty members have been self-archived (http://acikarsiv.ankara.edu.tr/) and made accessible to public since the beginning of 2006. The ‘Hacettepe University Electronic Theses Project’ has been carried to make the full-texts of graduate theses and dissertations accessible through the internet. In September 2003, The Middle East Technical University Library Theses and Dissertation Archive was established and since then students have been submitting their theses in electronic format to their IRs’ system. Because of these good practices, We started to establish our own institutional repositories. Istanbul Ayd?n University Institutional Repositorie (IAUIR) contains valuable scientific contents like articles, proceedings, visual materials, poster sessions, books and book chapters etc.

CSU Explores the Possibility of a Google Books Partnership – Cal schol.com

“Just heard yesterday that our CSU Council of Library Deans (COLD) approved a request I’d made to send records of our entire CSU print holdings to Google Books for evaluation. Google Books will run a comparison of their current digitized holdings against our holdings and evaluate on their end whether a digitization partnership makes sense. If it does, then the CSU will consider whether it might make sense for us as well….”

CSU Explores the Possibility of a Google Books Partnership – Cal schol.com

“Just heard yesterday that our CSU Council of Library Deans (COLD) approved a request I’d made to send records of our entire CSU print holdings to Google Books for evaluation. Google Books will run a comparison of their current digitized holdings against our holdings and evaluate on their end whether a digitization partnership makes sense. If it does, then the CSU will consider whether it might make sense for us as well….”

2019?That?Was The Year That Was? | Unlocking Research

“2019 saw?a number of?happenings in the policy space at Cambridge. Most excitingly, the University’s?Position Statement on Open Research?was announced in February, making it one of the first UK universities to have such a statement. This demonstrates the University’s commitment to making open research a reality at Cambridge. 

Following on from this, in July 2019, the University together with Cambridge University Press? announced that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA). The newly created?Open Research Steering Committee, headed by the University’s Pro-Vice Chancellor for Research,?will have oversight over the open research direction and?the?implementation of DORA.?The Steering Committee and their working groups are currently looking into open research training, open research infrastructure (such as electronic research notebooks), Plan S and DORA.?

In December, an updated version of the?Research Data Management Policy Framework?was released. This update brings the policy framework?in?alignment?with funder requirements and acknowledges?the important roles that Principal Investigators,?research staff and students, and University support staff play in good data management practices.?It sits beneath?the Position Statement on Open Research, with the documents being closely aligned.?…”