Investments in Open Services via SCOSS The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services – YouTube

“This webinar, hosted by CARL, CRKN, and ARL on Nov. 5, 2020, presents an overview of the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS)’s progress thus far, celebrates its successes, highlights some challenges faced, and looks at Canada and the United States’ role in the exciting yet difficult endeavour of supporting and strengthening the diverse and uneven global open scholarship infrastructure.”

On the verge of success – or failure? Reflections on repositories and the wider library knowledge infrastructure (and a bit about Hyku). | ID: 712a1039-373d-43d8-86db-fd5f08173ec3 | Hyku UP

“With the breakthrough of the open science and research information management agenda repositories appear to have succeeded. Libraries, declared dead by some in a digital information environment, see their role now increasingly as provider of services for open research. Yet not all is as well as it seems. On the one hand, many institutions struggle to properly maintain their infrastructure and provide a good user experience. On the other hand, closed commercial services dazzle users but are a risk to transparency and openness. In this presentation I want to discuss some of the wider challenges I see for knowledge infrastructure services and talk about some relevant activities I am currently involved in – including the experiences of the British Library with using the Samvera-based Hyku solution for a shared repository service….”

On the verge of success – or failure? Reflections on repositories and the wider library knowledge infrastructure (and a bit about Hyku). | ID: 712a1039-373d-43d8-86db-fd5f08173ec3 | Hyku UP

“With the breakthrough of the open science and research information management agenda repositories appear to have succeeded. Libraries, declared dead by some in a digital information environment, see their role now increasingly as provider of services for open research. Yet not all is as well as it seems. On the one hand, many institutions struggle to properly maintain their infrastructure and provide a good user experience. On the other hand, closed commercial services dazzle users but are a risk to transparency and openness. In this presentation I want to discuss some of the wider challenges I see for knowledge infrastructure services and talk about some relevant activities I am currently involved in – including the experiences of the British Library with using the Samvera-based Hyku solution for a shared repository service….”

Reflections on Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Challenges and a Way Forward: Proceedings of a Workshop | The National Academies Press

“On November 18 and 19, 2019, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine hosted a public workshop in Washington, DC, titled Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Challenges and a Way Forward. The workshop followed the release of the 2015 Institute of Medicine (IOM) consensus study report Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Maximizing Benefits, Minimizing Risk, and was designed to examine the current state of clinical trial data sharing and reuse and to consider ways in which policy, technology, incentives, and governance could be leveraged to further encourage and enhance data sharing. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.”

Hahnel Argues for Making Data as Open as Possible | NIH Record

“Speaking virtually from London to a group of more than 120 NIH employees at a recent NIH Data Science Town Hall sponsored by the Office of Data Science Strategy, Dr. Mark Hahnel said, “To get the most out of science, research data needs to be as open as possible, as closed as necessary.”

For Hahnel, “open as possible” means data that is published openly and well-described. It also means educating researchers on the importance of data-sharing and the tools available to them….”

The Case for Making Data as Open as Possible | Data Science at NIH

“In July 2020 the Office of Data Science Strategy (ODSS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) completed the NIH Figshare Instance project, a one-year pilot with existing generalist repository Figshare to determine how biomedical researchers may use a generalist repository for sharing and reusing NIH-funded data.

To mark the conclusion of this project, ODSS invited Figshare founder and CEO Mark Hahnel, Ph.D., to share some of the pilot outcomes, his perspective on lessons learned from the project, and his thoughts on the future of data sharing at the NIH Data Science Town Hall, a monthly meeting for NIH employees interested in data science activities across the agency. The recording(link is external) of his presentation is now available. …”