From Open Access to Open Data: Collaborative Work in the University Libraries of Catalonia. Mireia Alcalá & Lluís Anglada (CSUC)

Presentation slides: “From Open Access to Open Data: Collaborative Work in the University Libraries of Catalonia. Mireia Alcalá & Lluís Anglada (CSUC)”.

OSF | Preprints: a journey though time

As an entity, whilst preprints have been around for some time, there have been a number of significant developments over the last few years. In this short talk, Graham will take you through a journey in time, touching upon the history, developments and what the future may hold in terms of preprints.

Scholarly Communications Model Policy and Licence: Publishers’ Association Concerns together with UK-SCL Steering Group Responses

“The proposed policy is based on the Harvard model which has been in use since 2008 and has been adopted by over 60 institutions worldwide, including  Ivy League universities whose publishing outputs eclipse the numbers published in total in the UK. Under the Harvard model policy, waivers are  requested for less than 5% of articles. We are at a loss to understand why,  therefore, the estimate is so high for UK authors and why UK authors might  be treated differently to their counterparts in existing ‘Harvard policy’ institutions.”

 

Cambridge’s journey towards Open Access

“Presentation given at Open Repositories 2017, Brisbane, Australia. General track 13: Evaluation and assessment. This presentation discusses the open agenda supported by funder policies in the United Kingdom (UK), how these policies interact with one another and the resulting implications for higher education institutions using the case study of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge has responded to the challenges of open research by founding the Office of Scholarly Communication and dedicating specialized teams to manage compliance with both Open Access and research data requirements. Since 2013 the Open Access Service has processed over 10,000 article submissions and spent more than £7 million on article processing charges. The experiences at Cambridge in responding to these challenges are an important lesson for anyone engaged in open research. This talk offers some insights into a potential way to manage funder mandates, but also acts as a cautionary tale for other countries and institutions considering introducing mandates around Open Access and what the implementation of certain policies might entail. The skills around management of open policies are significantly different to traditional library activity, and this has implications for training and recruitment of staff.”

 

Machine accessibility of Open Access scientific publications from publisher systems via ResourceSync

“Poster presented at OAI10, University of Geneva, 21 -23 June 2017.”

 

“The number of scholarly research papers being published is gradually growing; it is estimated that approximately 1.5 million of research papers are produced each year and about 4% of them are offered via Open Access journals[1]. The high volume of scientific papers introduces new opportunities for content discoverability and facilitates a growth in various scientific disciplines via text and data mining (TDM)[2]. One of the greatest barriers to TDM is caused by the difficulty of programmatically accessing open access content from a wide range of publishers[3]…”

Exploiting Elsevier’s Creative Commons License Requirement to Subvert Embargo

“In the last round of author sharing policy revisions, Elsevier created a labyrinthine title-by-title embargo structure requiring embargoes from 12-48 months for author sharing via institutional repository (IR), while permitting immediate sharing via author’s personal website or blog. At the same time, all pre-publication versions are to bear a Creative Commons-Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND) license. At the time this policy was announced, it was rightly criticized by many in the scholarly communication community as overly complicated and unnecessary. However, this CC licensing requirement creates an avenue for subverting the embargo in the IR to achieve quicker open distribution of the author’s accepted manuscript. In short, authors may post an appropriately licensed copy on their personal site, at which point we may deposit without embargo in the IR, not through the license granted in the publication agreement, but through the CC license on the author’s version, which the sharing policy mandates. This poster will outline this issue, our experimentation with application, and engage viewers in questions regarding its potential risks, benefits, and workflows.”