Transformative Models for Scholarly Publishing | CCC’s Velocity of Content Podcast

“Flexibility and freedom to experiment are critical for any publishing team when building a strategy to automate and manage so-called, “transformative agreements.”

With COVID-19 accelerating the pressure to “publish open” and to adopt sustainable Open Access (OA) business models, the complexity of these transformative agreements and the number of stakeholders involved across publishers and institutions presents significant strategic and management challenges.

A panel discussion in December for STM Week 2020 explored how these agreements can become a test of data quality, technology and operational acumen for all parties involved. …”

Library as Key Partner in Open Pedagogy (part 1) – YouTube

“As part of the author series from Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations, you are invited to discover different ways in which faculty, library staff, and students work together to engage and enrich the learning process.

In this workshop, authors Anne Brown and Amanda MacDonald (Virginia Tech) will share their work from the chapter, Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies. Following, Laurie Taylor and Brian Keith (University of Florida) will discuss the ideas in their chapter, Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model….”

Library as Key Partner in Open Pedagogy (part 1) – YouTube

“As part of the author series from Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations, you are invited to discover different ways in which faculty, library staff, and students work together to engage and enrich the learning process.

In this workshop, authors Anne Brown and Amanda MacDonald (Virginia Tech) will share their work from the chapter, Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies. Following, Laurie Taylor and Brian Keith (University of Florida) will discuss the ideas in their chapter, Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model….”

OER in the Humanities – YouTube

“As part of the author series from Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations, you are invited to discover different ways in which faculty, library staff, and students work together to engage and enrich the learning process.

In this workshop, Bryan McGeary (Pennsylvania State University) and Christopher Guder (Ohio University) will discuss the ideas in their chapter, Harnessing the Power of Student-Created Content: Faculty and Librarians Collaborating in the Open Educational Environment.  Following, authors Christian Beck, Lily Dubach, Sarah Norris and John Vanecek (University of Central Florida) will share their work from the chapter, Humanities in the Open: The Challenges of Creating an Open Literature Anthology….”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

MLA 2021 Session on “Towards Sustainability for Digital Archives and Projects” | SHARP

[This is the abstract for just one of seven presentations.]

Abstract:  Over the last decade, the digital humanities community has become increasingly concerned with the ongoing sustainability of digital projects. This anxiety stems in part from the realization that not all digital humanities projects have identical expectations of longevity. Several prominent works in the literature, such as Bethany Nowviskie and Dot Porter’s “Graceful Degradation Survey Findings: How Do We Manage Digital Humanities Projects through Times of Transition and Decline?” (2010) and Geoffrey Rockwell et al.’s “Burying Dead Projects: Depositing the Globalization Compendium” (2014), have been central to this intellectual exchange about the benefits of creating sustainability plans for projects that do not necessarily assume a default permanence, but that instead proactively consider each project’s most suitable longevity strategy.

 

With this realization has come a concomitant expectation: each digital humanities project must create its own customized sustainability plan, designed with its particular requirements in mind. And yet, few digital humanists have access to direct training on the process of creating and implementing professional-grade digital preservation and sustainability practices for their own work. To support the process of designing and implementing digital sustainability plans for this work, a team of scholars housed in the Visual Media Workshop at the University of Pittsburgh has created the Socio-Technical Sustainability Roadmap (STSR; http://sustainingdh.net). The STSR is a structured, process-oriented workshop, inspired by design thinking and collaborative learning approaches. This workshop, which may be implemented in a variety of institutional contexts, guides project stakeholders through the practice of creating effective, iterative, ongoing digital sustainability strategies that address the needs of both social and technological infrastructures. It is founded on the fundamental assumption that, for sustainability practices to be successful, project leaders must keep the changing, socially-contingent nature of both their project and their working environment(s) consistently in mind as they initiate, maintain, and support their own work. For this panel, we contextualize and describe the STSR, and provide reflections based on our experiences facilitating Sustaining DH: An NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities.

Slide deck highlighting answers to five questions about FAIR data – Accelerate Open Science

“Our Accelerate Open Science Project aims to give context to various developments in the area of Open Science, and to make information about topics such as FAIR data easier accessible. As a second slide deck in our Info Slides Series, we present you Answers to five questions about FAIR data.

The slide deck is licensed under a CC-BY license, which enables you to make use of it any way you want. You can find the slides here….”