Webinars – Transitioning Society Publications to OA

“The Society Publishers Coalition (SocPC) and Transitioning Society Journals to Open Access (TSPOA) developed webinars about the changing face of society journal publishing. 

This three-part webinar series is intended to help foster the transition of learned society journals to open access by contextualizing their role within a changing scholarly communications landscape, increasing awareness of their publishing practices and operational needs, and engaging the broader community of publishing stakeholders in discussions and decision-making about how best to support society publishing in an open access landscape….”

Open access monographs: from policy to reality (2 October 2019)

“This one-day symposium took place at St Catharine’s College at the University of Cambridge on 2 October 2019 and explored the policies, economics and future directions of open access monograph publishing. Attendees had the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book.? Keynote speakers included Professor Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London) and Professor Margot Finn (President of the Royal Historical Society) and the panel discussions were comprised by representatives from Research England, The Wellcome Trust, academic experts on the subject as well as various publishing houses. The panel discussions aimed to create a forum for researchers to express the challenges and benefits they foresee if open access monographs becomes a requirement.

Full details of the speakers and panellists can be found in the event programme flyer.

The symposium was supported by the Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin.

Open access monographs: from policy to reality (2 October 2019) – Symposium programme
Welcome – Dr Jessica Gardner
The Economics and Political-Economics of Open-Access Monograph Publishing – Prof. Martin Paul Eve
Open research publishing in the humanities – Dr Nicola Kozicharow
Open Access Monographs: From Policy to Reality – Perspectives from the Royal Historical Society – Prof. Margot Finn
Policy and practice: Moving towards Plan S and REF – panel discussion featuring Dr Steven Hill (chair), Prof. Martin Paul Eve, Prof. Margot Finn, Hannah Hope and Prof. Roger Kain
Perspectives from Cambridge University Press – Ben Denne, Matt Day, Helen Barton and Chris Harrison

Definitions of Open? – Matt Day
Open Access monograph publishing: Benefits and Challenges – Helen Barton
Sharing Knowledge is Cool: OA experiments in context – Chris Harrison

Innovations in open monograph publishing – panel discussion featuring Patricia Killiard (chair), Janneke Adema, Ben Denne, Dr Rupert Gatti, Rosalind Pyne and Lara Speicher

Radical Open Access – Janneke Adema

Reflections of the day – Dr Ruper Gatti, Dr Steven Hill, Prof. Roger Kain and Dr Helen Snaith
Closing remarks – Niamh Tumelty….”

The Open Access Landscape – an overview

A presentation by Jan Erik Frantsvåg at the 1st Basel Sustainable Publishing  Forum September 9th 2019.

Daring to dream of Universal Open Access

Abstract:  This talk will discuss recent developments with an amalgamated model for open access based on library and funder support that holds out some promise for addressing the current need for universal open access. The talk will consider the calculus underlying the model; in relation to precursors (e.g., SCOAP3, OLH, Knowledge Unlatched, Gates’ Chronos) and its advantages of the model for researchers, libraries, funders, societies, and publishers. The talk will also take into account the global dimensions of such a model; it will report on current initiatives in implementing it in the social sciences while considering its implications for the sciences.

 

Let’s just get on with it – ?‘open’ in Australia in 2019

“This talk, given to the CAUL Research Repositories Community Days on 28 October 2019, delves into the current state of openness in Australia. It looks at some of the causes of the lack of progress and provides suggestions for ramping up activity into 2020.”