Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

“Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research invites submissions to the “Innovations in Practice” section related to the concept of “open” in libraries.

“Innovations in Practice” is a peer-reviewed section that seeks to describe and evaluate new library initiatives. For our Vol. 15 no. 2 issue (2020), we’re interested in highlighting articles that explore new ways of implementing concepts of openness in libraries. Potential areas for discussion could include, but are not limited to, the following topics within the scope of libraries and archives:

Open data 
Open access platforms and publishing
Open source software
OERs
Wikipedia …”

Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

“Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research invites submissions to the “Innovations in Practice” section related to the concept of “open” in libraries.

“Innovations in Practice” is a peer-reviewed section that seeks to describe and evaluate new library initiatives. For our Vol. 15 no. 2 issue (2020), we’re interested in highlighting articles that explore new ways of implementing concepts of openness in libraries. Potential areas for discussion could include, but are not limited to, the following topics within the scope of libraries and archives:

Open data 
Open access platforms and publishing
Open source software
OERs
Wikipedia …”

Libraries Are Leading Advocates Shaping and Influencing Greater Access to Information during COVID-19 Crisis – Association of Research Libraries

“As higher education and most of daily life has withdrawn from physical spaces and shifted to a fully online environment to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, librarians and library collectives have focused their already strong communication and advocacy networks to ensure continuous access to information for scholars and all others who depend on it now.

Viewing this moment with scholars at the center, the coronavirus pandemic is revealing both what works and what doesn’t in scholarly communication. The scale of this disease presents a dire use case for open science—the rapid sharing and evaluation of research, and an emphasis on machine readability and computability to handle volume and speed….”

The Global Impact of Open Access and How Academic Libraries Can Help Shape It

“Join us on Monday March 16th at 8 a.m. ET for the third of a four-part webinar series organized by Cornell University Library that brings together librarians and thought leaders around the world to address the challenges outlined by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

“The Global Impact of Open Access and How Academic Libraries Can Help Shape It” will focus on how Open Access repositories can contribute to work being done in furtherance of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and how academic libraries can help best support these endeavors….”

COVID-19, Copyright, and Library Superpowers Part II | Kyle K. Courtney

“Despite all that it [17 U.S.C. §108] can be – like fair use – and effective exception that can be harnessed in this COVID-19 crisis time. So, aspects of this law will be familiar and relevant to some (interlibrary loan for example) and some will not. I will cover some highlights for this COVID-19 crisis (not covering preservation activities, for example) and translate it to plain language, where possible….”

Accesso Libre: Equity of Access to Information through the Lens of Neoliberal Responsiblization | Semantic Scholar

Abstract:  This paper uses the concept of neoliberal responsibilization, the reductive framing of systemic power dynamics as questions of individual choice and agency, to critically interrogate equity of access to information, a central value of the broader field of library and information science (LIS). Based on a case study of Accesso Libre, a public/private partnership based in a South Los Angeles public library, I argue that equity of access to information is an insufficient concept to evaluate the power dynamics of this (and similar) partnerships, wherein powerful corporations encourage the use of commercial informational resources in minoritized communities. As an alternative, responsibilization directs analysis to different questions about equity, a set of concerns that offer LIS theorists and practitioners a way of reflecting on the ethical commitments at the core of the field. 

 

Accesso Libre: Equity of Access to Information through the Lens of Neoliberal Responsiblization | Semantic Scholar

Abstract:  This paper uses the concept of neoliberal responsibilization, the reductive framing of systemic power dynamics as questions of individual choice and agency, to critically interrogate equity of access to information, a central value of the broader field of library and information science (LIS). Based on a case study of Accesso Libre, a public/private partnership based in a South Los Angeles public library, I argue that equity of access to information is an insufficient concept to evaluate the power dynamics of this (and similar) partnerships, wherein powerful corporations encourage the use of commercial informational resources in minoritized communities. As an alternative, responsibilization directs analysis to different questions about equity, a set of concerns that offer LIS theorists and practitioners a way of reflecting on the ethical commitments at the core of the field. 

 

UK universities ‘paid big publishers £1 billion’ in past decade | Times Higher Education (THE)

“UK negotiators have vowed to strike “cost-effective and sustainable” deals with big publishers, as figures reveal that subscriptions to academic journals and other publishing charges are likely to have cost UK universities more than £1 billion over the past decade.

Data obtained using Freedom of Information requests show that UK universities paid some £950.6 million to the world’s 10 biggest publishing houses between 2010 and 2019. For the sector as a whole, however, the overall bill is likely to have topped £1 billion as one in five universities, including several Russell Group institutions, failed to provide cost information.

More than 90 per cent of this outlay was spent with five companies: Elsevier, Wiley, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis and Sage, with Elsevier claiming £394 million over the 10-year period, roughly 41 per cent of monies received by big publishers….”

UK universities ‘paid big publishers £1 billion’ in past decade | Times Higher Education (THE)

“UK negotiators have vowed to strike “cost-effective and sustainable” deals with big publishers, as figures reveal that subscriptions to academic journals and other publishing charges are likely to have cost UK universities more than £1 billion over the past decade.

Data obtained using Freedom of Information requests show that UK universities paid some £950.6 million to the world’s 10 biggest publishing houses between 2010 and 2019. For the sector as a whole, however, the overall bill is likely to have topped £1 billion as one in five universities, including several Russell Group institutions, failed to provide cost information.

More than 90 per cent of this outlay was spent with five companies: Elsevier, Wiley, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis and Sage, with Elsevier claiming £394 million over the 10-year period, roughly 41 per cent of monies received by big publishers….”

Google Books 2020 Update | Communications

“What would you do if Google came to you and said: You have 1 million items that we would like to scan for you and make available to the world?

Over the past two years, a team from Access Services, Stacks Management, Library Technology Services, Information and Technical Services, Harvard Depository, and ReCAP have been attempting to do just that as part of a Harvard Library Digital Strategies and Innovation (DSI) initiative. This project began nearly a decade after our first partnership with Google Books, and it has been an opportunity to approach this work differently — to identify the challenges that we face at each step of the workflow and to look for creative, iterative ways to meet them….

Between 2004 and 2009, Google scanned 891,164 volumes from Harvard. Google has begun reprocessing those materials, enhancing and correcting the raw images and running them through updated OCR to create better, more searchable, machine-readable text.  

As part of this relationship, we are involved in the Google Library Partners group, an active community of our colleagues from peer institutions who also share their materials with Google. As a group we have been able to advocate for and contribute to reviews for handling of materials, quality assurance in scanning, and expanded treatments for items with foldouts or materials of non-traditional size. We have also led a review of how our peers provide access to materials and are actively partnering with HathiTrust to conduct more research into how users find and utilize these materials….”