Publishing, P&T, and Equity, an Open Access Week Miniseries, Part 3: How Librarians Became Experts on Publishing and Equity

Happy Open Access Week! This is the final installment in our 3-part mini-series of blog posts on Publishing, P&T, and Equity. The overarching issue: how to reform our research evaluation processes to eliminate bias and promote structural equity. On Monday I argued for ending P&T standards that reward journal ‘prestige.’ On Wednesday I wrote about why institutions who want to build structural equity should reward open publishing practices in their research evaluation processes. Today I will conclude with a little meta-piece on the Library’s place in all this.

Publishing, P&T, and Equity, an Open Access Week Miniseries, Part 3: How Librarians Became Experts on Publishing and Equity

Happy Open Access Week! This is the final installment in our 3-part mini-series of blog posts on Publishing, P&T, and Equity. The overarching issue: how to reform our research evaluation processes to eliminate bias and promote structural equity. On Monday I argued for ending P&T standards that reward journal ‘prestige.’ On Wednesday I wrote about why institutions who want to build structural equity should reward open publishing practices in their research evaluation processes. Today I will conclude with a little meta-piece on the Library’s place in all this.

Research Libraries, Emerging Technologies—and a Pandemic | EDUCAUSE

“Openness is a value and set of practices that evolved, in the digital age, from the traditional research library purpose of collecting and sharing scholarly outputs. It thus guides an array of research library activities including building digital collections and negotiating licensing terms for purchased digital content for new scholarly methods, such as text analysis and data mining. Openness is the ideal that motivates our open-access efforts and drives research libraries to partner in building data infrastructures and standards that support interoperability and data sharing. This value serves research libraries well as we prioritize work that supports distance learning and off-site research. Nurturing this value in times of trouble will ensure that our hard work done under duress is still available to our constituents in calmer times ahead of us….”

Advancing Open Knowledge Grants | Harvard Library

“Harvard Library’s Advancing Open Knowledge Grants Program seeks to advance open knowledge and foster innovation to further diversity, inclusion, belonging and anti-racism

This new grant program provides project awards of up to $10,000. Projects can take a variety of forms, but should be grounded in Harvard Library’s values. Library staff are encouraged to partner with Harvard faculty, centers, or departments….”

Reassembling Scholarly Communications: Histories, Infrastructures, and Global Politics of Open Access | MIT Press Open Access

Table of contents:

 

Epistemic Alienation in African Scholarly Communications: Open Access as a Pharmakon – Thomas Hervé Mboa Nkoudou
Scholarly Communications and Social Justice – Charlotte Roh, Harrison W. Inefuku, and Emily Drabinski
Social Justice and Inclusivity: Drivers for the Dissemination of African Scholarship – Reggie Raju, Jill Claassen, Namhla Madini, and Tamzyn Suliaman
Can Open Scholarly Practices Redress Epistemic Injustice? – Denisse Albornoz, Angela Okune, and Leslie Chan
When the Law Advances Access to Learning: Locke and the Origins of Modern Copyright – John Willinsky
How Does a Format Make a Public? – Robin de Mourat, Donato Ricci, and Bruno Latour
Peer Review: Readers in the Making of Scholarly Knowledge – David Pontille and Didier Torny
The Making of Empirical Knowledge: Recipes, Craft, and Scholarly Communication – Pamela H. Smith, Tianna Helena Uchacz, Naomi Rosenkranz, and Claire Conklin Sabel
The Royal Society and the Noncommercial Circulation of Knowledge – Aileen Fyfe
The Political Histories of UK Public Libraries and Access to Knowledge – Stuart Lawson
Libraries and Their Publics in the United States – Maura A. Smale
Open Access, “Publicity,” and Democratic Knowledge – John Holmwood
Libraries, Museums, and Archives as Speculative Knowledge Infrastructure – Bethany Nowviskie
Preserving the Past for the Future: Whose Past? Everyone’s Future – April M. Hathcock
Is There a Text in These Data? The Digital Humanities and Preserving the Evidence – Dorothea Salo
Accessing the Past, or Should Archives Provide Open Access? – István Rév
Infrastructural Experiments and the Politics of Open Access – Jonathan Gray
The Platformization of Open – Penny C. S. Andrews
Reading Scholarship Digitally – Martin Paul Eve
Toward Linked Open Data for Latin America – Arianna Becerril-García and Eduardo Aguado-López
The Pasts, Presents, and Futures of SciELO – Abel L. Packer
Not Self-Indulgence, but Self-Preservation: Open Access and the Ethics of Care – Eileen A. Joy
Toward a Global Open-Access Scholarly Communications System: A Developing Region Perspective – Dominique Babini
Learned Societies, Humanities Publishing, and Scholarly Communication

Internet Archive to Celebrate the Grand Reopening of the Marygrove College Library – Internet Archive Blogs

“Join us this Tuesday, October 20, at the final session of the Library Leaders Forum for a celebration of the reopening of the Marygrove College Library. Find out how digitization saved a valuable archive and preserved a community’s cultural heritage….”

Open Access in the Context of COVID-19 – PUL Scheduler – Princeton University

“Perhaps more than any other time, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has foregrounded the importance of open access in support of the dissemination of scholarly resources. With regard to COVID-related research specifically, pre-print servers (ArXiv, BioRxiv, MedArXiv, etc) are playing a vital role in disseminating and advancing research on pace with the pandemic. Publishers are also providing access to research resources in unprecedented and creative ways. At the center are libraries, which are responsible for aggregating information about and access to established and emerging OA initiatives, while also developing strategies to support OA in the future. Learn more about how OA helps and develops during COVID-19 from pre-print servers, publishing, and library vantage points.”

All for One…Health for All: The Role of Open Access, Evidence-Based Information to Improve Health for All Species – NLM Musings from the Mezzanine

“Beyond personal experiences caring for animals at home or at work, One Health is a critical framework for providing timely, open, high-quality information during times of wildfires and natural disasters that can affect all species. Responding to natural disasters brings together teams who work primarily with humans and teams who typically work with animals. Many veterinary schools provide emergency preparedness education in addition to deploying veterinary emergency teams to respond to emergency situations that may be all species-focused or primarily a human health oriented mission. Central knowledge resources like the American Red Cross also provide apps and information to support people and pets during times of crisis.

Libraries who participate in the NLM-supported Network of the National Library of Medicine are essential resources for people seeking information online from trusted sources. Health sciences librarians, particularly the members of the Medical Library Association’s Animal and Veterinary Information Specialist Caucus, support the health of all species by addressing questions raised by people who live, work, and share the broader environment with companion animals and wildlife. These questions may come to public, community college, and university libraries who rely on free and direct access to high-quality resources written for a variety of audiences….”

Internet Archive Joins Project ReShare – Internet Archive Blogs

“The Internet Archive is the newest library to join Project ReShare, a group of organizations coming together to develop an open source resource sharing platform for libraries.

“Internet Archive is pleased to partner with Project ReShare and its member libraries and consortia to build the next generation of library resource sharing tools,” says Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive. “We believe in community-developed software and support library efforts to build systems that address the ever-present challenges of connecting readers and learners with books.”

The project was formed in 2018 in response to concern about market consolidation and the pace of innovation among vendors serving libraries. Rather than rely solely on commercial providers, members wanted to be able to set their own priorities….”

EBSCO Information Services Partners with Three Institutions to Develop Analytics Platform

“EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) will partner with University of Denver, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Chalmers University of Technology to develop a next-generation analytics platform. The platform will combine and streamline data sets from library and campus systems, allowing library staff to demonstrate a library’s impact while making informed decisions on collections and services….”