Open access to teaching material – how far have we come? | Impact of Social Sciences

“One of the foundational aims of the open access movement, set out in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to provide access to research not only to scholars, but to “teachers, students and other curious minds” and in so doing “enrich education”. However almost two decades on from the declaration access to the research literature for educational purposes remains limited. In this post Elizabeth Gadd, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison present their research into the volume of open access material available for educational purposes, finding that although much research is now available to read, a significant proportion is not licensed in a way that allows its use for teaching….”

Open access to teaching material – how far have we come? | Impact of Social Sciences

“One of the foundational aims of the open access movement, set out in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to provide access to research not only to scholars, but to “teachers, students and other curious minds” and in so doing “enrich education”. However almost two decades on from the declaration access to the research literature for educational purposes remains limited. In this post Elizabeth Gadd, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison present their research into the volume of open access material available for educational purposes, finding that although much research is now available to read, a significant proportion is not licensed in a way that allows its use for teaching….”

Open Access Monographs: from policy to reality (a one-day symposium) – Wed 2 Oct 2019

“The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.??

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book.?…”

Open Access Monographs: from policy to reality (a one-day symposium) – Wed 2 Oct 2019

“The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.??

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book.?…”

BISG Study Finds Path Forward for Open Access Books | CCC’s Beyond the Book

“A two-year research project funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council reported in 2017 on the ominous health of academic book publishing. As the number of titles sold rose by nearly half, from 43,000 to 63,000 between 2005 and 2014, unit sales in the same period for academic books fell 13%, from 4.34 million copies to 3.76 million annually, a drop of nearly 600,000. According to a report in the Times of London Higher Education Supplement, that drop meant average sales per title fell from 100 to 60 books.

Any effort to save scholarly monograph publishing will rely on usage data, though that remains hard to come by. With a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Book Industry Study Group and several other collaborators in the US and the UK recently undertook a review of factors holding back adoption of e-book monographs. The conclusion – granular and comparable data on users and usage of such works is needed to justify not only publishing programs, but also research activities….”

Horizon 2020 and UK Research and Innovation Requirements for H2020 Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

“Twice a year, Jisc contacts Horizon2020-funded projects in the UK on behalf of OpenAIRE (www.openaire.eu) which supports the EC’s Open Access policies.  Jisc is the National Open Access Desk for OpenAIRE in the UK, and we contact project coordinators because there are particular Open Access obligations within most of the Horizon2020 projects for the EC:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions.
Open Research Data Pilot: Projects in designated areas of H2020 will participate in a pilot project to make the underlying data related to project outputs openly available and accessible for use by other researchers, innovative industries and citizens.  If you have signed up to the pilot, you will need to make your research data openly available, as well.

How many OA publications does your project have? Take a look at your project page at: https://explore.openaire.eu/search/find/projects. You can use this page to help you with reporting!…”

Resisting big data exploitations in public healthcare: Free riding or distributive justice? – Vezyridis – – Sociology of Health & Illness – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  We draw on findings from qualitative interviews with health data researchers, GPs and citizens who opted out from NHS England’s care.data programme to explore controversies and negotiations around data sharing in the NHS. Drawing on theoretical perspectives from science and technology studies, we show that the new socio?technical, ethical and economic arrangements were resisted not only on the basis of individual autonomy and protection from exploitation, but also as a collective effort to protect NHS services and patient data. We argue that the resulting opt?outs were a call for more personal control over data use. This was not because these citizens placed their personal interests above those of society. It was because they resisted proposed arrangements by networks of stakeholders, not seen as legitimate, to control flows and benefits of NHS patient data. Approaching informed consent this way helps us to explore resistance as a collective action for influencing the direction of such big data programmes towards the preservation of public access to healthcare as well as the distribution of ethical decision?making between independent, trustworthy institutions and individual citizens.

The availability of open access videos offered by dental schools – Dias da Silva – – European Journal of Dental Education – Wiley Online Library

Abstract. Aim

 

Evaluate the video content offered by UK and Republic of Ireland (RoI) Dental Schools on their YouTube channels and public websites.

Methods

Free videos offered on UK and RoI Dental schools websites and YouTube channels, were watched and set according to its purpose, as educational or non?educational. The number of views, length, category and date of publication were analysed.

Results

A total of 627 videos offered by dental courses were evaluated. Videos were available on 83% of the websites, but only 9% was educational content. Dental courses YouTube channels received more than 2.3 million views, but less than 5% of the material offered is educational. Instructional videos found on the websites (3.2 min) were shorter than those found on YouTube (8.5 min) (p=0.03). The majority of the videos, provided by Universities, were not educational and focused on promoting the dental courses. Most websites have demonstrated a password protected area where quality content may be offered.

Conclusion

Students wishing to watch instructional videos will find limited educational content provided by UK and RoI dental courses. Therefore they are likely to access course related material elsewhere on the Internet that may not be necessarily peer?reviewed.

Challenges in Scholarly Publishing Cycle 2019

“Our 2019 conference will provide librarians and information professionals with an invaluable insight into best practice for delivering the open research agenda.

With funders placing an increasing emphasis on open research, librarians are faced with the challenge of changing entrenched practices among researchers – particularly around the submission stage.

At CISPC 2019, we will be bringing together speakers from around the world that have addressed this challenge head on, and who will share their experiences and expertise with fellow scholarly communication professionals….”

REF Project Officer, Goldsmiths, University of London

“This post is based in the Library within the Online Research Collections team who manage and organise Goldsmiths research outputs via Goldsmiths Research Online and Goldsmiths Journals Online. This post will work alongside another REF Project Officer and REF Project Assistant to prepare Goldsmiths research outputs for submission to REF2021 and report to the Online Research Collections Manager.

The successful candidate will have excellent organisational skills and will be required to review, edit and enter metadata for research outputs, gather information on Open Access compliance, advise and assist academics who produce Practice Research, produce reports and communicate effectively to a variety of stakeholders.”