Terms and conditions for research grants | Parkinson’s UK

“Once a grant has been awarded [by Parkinson’s UK] and accepted, the grantholder and host institution are bound by our research grant terms and conditions and revenue sharing policy….”

The policy was apparently new or updated in July 2018.

The UK Scholarly Communication Licence: Attempting to Cut through the Gordian Knot of the Complexities of Funder Mandates, Publisher Embargoes and Researcher Caution in Achieving Open Access

Whilst take-up of open access (OA) in the UK is growing rapidly due partly to a number of funder mandates, managing the complexities of balancing compliance with these mandates against restrictive publisher policies and ingrained academic priorities, has resulted in UK higher education institutions (HEIs) often struggling with confused researchers, complex workflows, and rising costs. In order to try to address this situation, the UK Scholarly Communication Licence (UK-SCL) was formulated to bypass the root causes of many of these challenges by implementing a licensing mechanism for multiple-mandate compliance in one single policy. This is the first empirical study to focus on the genesis of the UK-SCL and how its implementation has been conceived thus far. A qualitative research method was used, taking the form of 14 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders from the initiative across the UK. The results indicate that those working within UK HEIs are concerned with the co mplexity of the current OA policy landscape and are frustrated with the inertia within the current system, which has resulted in higher costs, further publisher restrictions, and has not addressed the underlying tensions in academic culture. The UK-SCL is seen by its initiators as a way to achieve further transition towards OA and take back some element of control of the content produced at their institutions. The study concludes by modelling the ways in which the UK-SCL is intended to impact relationships between key stakeholders, and discussing possible implementation futures.

Research Data Infrastructures in the UK: Landscape Report

“This report reviews:

a. the policies and the services that support and promote open research data in

the UK,

b. some of the evidence as to the impact of those policies,

c. the take-up of services,

d. and the adoption of open data and more generally open science practices….”

The effect of consultant outcome publication on surgeon behaviour: a systematic review and narrative synthesis | The Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England

“Surgeon-specific outcome data, or consultant outcome publication, refers to public access to named surgeon procedural outcomes. Consultant outcome publication originates from cardiothoracic surgery, having been introduced to US and UK surgery in 1991 and 2005, respectively. It has been associated with an improvement in patient outcomes. However, there is concern that it may also have led to changes in surgeon behaviour. Surgeon-specific outcome data, or consultant outcome publication, refers to public access to named surgeon procedural outcomes. Consultant outcome publication originates from cardiothoracic surgery, having been introduced to US and UK surgery in 1991 and 2005, respectively. It has been associated with an improvement in patient outcomes. However, there is concern that it may also have led to changes in surgeon behaviour. This review assesses the literature for evidence of risk-averse behaviour, upgrading of patient risk factors and cessation of low-volume or poorly performing surgeons….[F]urther research is essential to ensure that high-risk patients are not inappropriately turned down for surgery.”

Shared research repository announcement – The British Library

“The British Library, working with a group of cultural and memory organisations, is piloting a shared repository service for research content built on an open source platform. The repository aims to increase the visibility and impact of research outputs, making the knowledge generated by cultural institutions easier to explore and use for new research.

The Library has appointed open access publisher Ubiquity Press to build the pilot repository. It will initially be populated with research outputs produced by the project’s partners, the British Museum, Tate, National Museums Scotland and MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), as well as the British Library’s own open research content….

The repository will be built using Samvera Hyku, a new, rapidly developing open source repository software in which multitenancy is a key feature. Hyku – developed initially in response to a call by the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a National Digital Platform – has a global developer community behind it who have made huge progress in a relatively short time….

RNLI launches an Open Data site! — Esri UK

Open Data and the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World were hot topics at our Esri UK conference last month. We showcased the power of using The Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s Open Data and The Living Atlas to perform real-world analysis in our opening plenary

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) provides a 24-hour service in the UK and Ireland and have saved over 142,200 lives since 1824.

The RNLI uses ArcGIS to analyse risk which enables them to save more lives through innovation, data analysis, and new technology. The next step to share knowledge is to make their data public, which is why the RNLI have released Open Data.

YERUN Statement on Open Science | investigación + biblioteca [I+B]

Google English: “The network of young European research universities YERUN (Young European Research Universities Network) has just published YERUN Statement on Open Science

The YERUN network is constituted by the following universities: Bremen, Konstanz and Ulm (Germany); Antwerpen (Belgium); Southern Denmark (Denmark); Autonomous University of Barcelona, Autonomous University of Madrid, Carlos III of Madrid and Pompeu Fabra (Spain); Eastern Finland (Finland); Paris Dauphine (France); Dublin City University (Ireland); University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy); Maastricht (The Netherlands); New Lisbon (Portugal); Brunel and Essex (United Kingdom); Linköping (Sweden)….”

Compliance is not the whole story | Unlocking Research

“Today, Research England released Monitoring sector progress towards compliance with funder open access policies the results of a survey they ran in August last year in conjunction with RCUK, Wellcome Trust and Jisc.

Cambridge University was one of the 113 institutions that answered a significant number of questions about how we were managing compliance with various open access policies, what systems we were using and our decision making processes.”