Better research through better infrastructure | Wonkhe | Policy Watch

“The inexorable rise of data driven methods, and the parallel rise of open research practice, mean that accessing and sharing huge amounts of data is inevitably going to be a major part of research in the future. In one sense this is a huge opportunity to lower the cost and raise the quality of research – more accessible data means that much more can be learned from a single experiment, and the ready availability of data from peers around the world means that findings can be cross-checked and replicated without having to generate new results.

More and more historical source materials are being digitised and shared through global and regional initiatives – more archives are emerging from library stacks and storage boxes to online databases and image galleries.

But resource storage and archival is a huge expense – both in terms of the raw cost of many terabytes of server and hard-disk space, and the expense of maintaining and updating records to aid discovery (there’ll be a continued marketing and awareness cost too). Current infrastructure provision is piecemeal and variable by discipline. …”

David Kernohan: Open data is about more than a licence | Wonkhe | Comment

“The release of the “Higher Education Student Statistics: UK, 2016/2017” (Statistical First Release 247) by HESA was accompanied around the sector by a series of sudden sharp intakes of breath in institutional data offices. It represents a brave and bold move into new ways of presenting and sharing data, and showed off a new format that will delight some and disappoint others. In this article I look at what has changed, and why.

The dash for designation. In applying for Designated Data Body status in England, HESA has made a move towards offering “open data”, suggesting that “From 2021 all of our publications will be available in open data format, allowing additional access to the information we enrich.” The Open Data Institute defines open data as “data that anyone can access, use or share,” which sounds like a pretty good thing. In many cases, though, open data has simply meant data that is available under an open (usually Creative Commons) licence – good to have legal clarity, but not at all the same as providing easily usable data.. HESA should be lauded for making this move for SFR248, but it is only a starting point….”

University of Oxford: RCUK Open Access Block Grant update | Research Support

“The University’s 2017–18 Open Access Block Grant from RCUK has now been exhausted. A new allocation will be available from 1 April 2018. RCUK-funded authors are therefore asked to delay submission of new articles to journals until 1 February 2018, and contact the Bodleian APC Team pre-submission (see the Open Access website for procedure). Please note that RCUK does not permit APCs (article processing charges) or page/other publication charges to be paid from individual RCUK awards – they must be paid from the block grant. Researchers are reminded that Oxford’s block grant will only pay APCs for fully open access journals (ie in the Directory of Open Access Journals), not ‘hybrid’ journals (subscription journals with a paid OA option). RCUK has stated that funding for APCs and other publication charges will continue for at least a further two years (April 2018–March 2020).”

An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) | University of Cambridge, Scholarly Communication

“Description Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions? Would you like to boost citations of your work? Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants? These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Event date:  Thursday, 1 February, 2018 Who is this event for?:  Researchers PhDs PIs

Event link:  An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences)”

FirstYear | OERu

“The OERu will soon be offering learners around the world, unlimited, fee-free access to high-quality open online courses created by an international network of innovative institutions. We are proud to launch assessment services for our first qualification in business studies early in 2018. The Certificate Higher Education Business (CertHE) is an introductory level qualification in business and management studies which provides a general overview for a possible career in business across a wide range of sectors and industries. This United Kingdom-based qualification will be conferred by the The University of the Highlands and Islands….”

England plans to map the entire country in 3D using planes equipped with lasers

“Within the next three years, England will use light detection and ranging (LIDAR) to survey the entirety of the country at one-meter resolution. LIDAR imaging has been an ongoing process for nearly 20 years in an effort to reduce flood risk. At present, about 75 percent of the country has been mapped, but the coverage is sparse in unpopulated areas and national parks.

All the data will also be available free to the public, as is the case with the current LIDAR data. In the past two years, users made more than a half-million LIDAR downloads from the Survey Open Data site….”

ORA Conference: “Help! I’m an author – get me out of here. A wish list for better research dissemination” – uuid:64bffc9c-a880-47e3-b855-2d0fc4e40928

Abstract:  The current UK open access (OA) environment is extremely complex, and the concept of OA as a ‘good thing’ is being lost. Inefficient processes are unavoidable; an astonishing amount of money is changing hands; numerous new journals are being produced; OA policies and funding are regularly reviewed and open to change; and all the while, research dissemination is evolving. Authors are caught in the middle of a complicated, and sometimes conflicting, mixture of requirements from funders and publishers. Many researchers want to use new models to distribute their findings and discuss them with peers. University research support staff attempt to filter policy requirements and simplify instructions and procedures for authors, whilst supporting them in using all forms of dissemination. This presentation focuses on the difficulties encountered when managing OA support for researchers within a large research-intensive institution, and challenges publishers with a wish list.

Institute of Public Health in Ireland Open Access Statement, October 2013

“This document states the Institute of Public Health in Ireland’s (IPH) commitment to an Open Access policy and outlines how it implements that policy….How the IPH will implement its Open Access policy: IPH was an original signatory to the Republic of Ireland’s National Principles for Open Access Policy Statement….IPH will continue to develop and manage a health information website called The Health Well which brings together and provides free access to a wide range of other health-related information held by our partner organisations….”

 

IGNTP releases Open Data

“The International Greek New Testament Project (IGNTP), established in 1948, is working towards major new editions of the Gospel according to John and the Pauline Epistles using the latest digital tools. The focus of work for these projects is at ITSEE in the University of Birmingham. In a move towards making its data openly available, the IGNTP has now released 350 of its transcriptions of Greek New Testament manuscripts under the Creative Commons Attribution licence, meaning that these files are freely available for re-use.”