COPIM | Open Book Publishers Blog

“On 14th June, Research England announced the award of a £2.2 million grant to the COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) project, which is designed to build much-needed community-controlled, open systems and infrastructures that will develop and strengthen open access book publishing. As a founder member of ScholarLed, one of the COPIM partners, we will be taking a key role in this project and our co-Director Rupert Gatti will be leading work packages on the dissemination and archiving of open access scholarly books. (For more details about the COPIM project and the aims of the various interlinked work packages, see the ScholarLed statement released on 17th June.)…”

1168219FP-R Software Engineer – Recruitment at the University of Southampton

“Applications are invited for a Software Engineer to work as part of an Enterprise team within the University of Southampton.

EPrints Services are part of the successful and long running enterprise activities in the School of Electronics and Computer Science. Enterprise activities are expanding and as such the team needs to grow too….

At the core is an open source repository platform that provides a flexible way to configure operations concerning data capture, structure and presentation, and a range of services that allow content to be accessed in a variety of ways.

We require applicants who can take responsibility for the development of customer focused projects for both EPrints systems and more varied engineering projects relating to Open Data, Digital Education, and systems integrations. All projects require some level of design, programming, testing, project management, and customer support….”

Cambridge Open Engage

“The collaborative platform to upload, share and advance your research

Cambridge Open Engage is the new early content platform from Cambridge University Press, designed to provide researchers with the space and resources to connect and collaborate with their communities, and rapidly disseminate early research. The platform is currently under development using a co-creation approach and we’re inviting researchers to actively input to help us shape the features and functionality….”

Open access to teaching material – how far have we come? | Impact of Social Sciences

“One of the foundational aims of the open access movement, set out in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to provide access to research not only to scholars, but to “teachers, students and other curious minds” and in so doing “enrich education”. However almost two decades on from the declaration access to the research literature for educational purposes remains limited. In this post Elizabeth Gadd, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison present their research into the volume of open access material available for educational purposes, finding that although much research is now available to read, a significant proportion is not licensed in a way that allows its use for teaching….”

Open access to teaching material – how far have we come? | Impact of Social Sciences

“One of the foundational aims of the open access movement, set out in the Budapest Open Access Initiative, was to provide access to research not only to scholars, but to “teachers, students and other curious minds” and in so doing “enrich education”. However almost two decades on from the declaration access to the research literature for educational purposes remains limited. In this post Elizabeth Gadd, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison present their research into the volume of open access material available for educational purposes, finding that although much research is now available to read, a significant proportion is not licensed in a way that allows its use for teaching….”

Open Access Monographs: from policy to reality (a one-day symposium) – Wed 2 Oct 2019

“The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.??

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book.?…”

Open Access Monographs: from policy to reality (a one-day symposium) – Wed 2 Oct 2019

“The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.??

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book.?…”

BISG Study Finds Path Forward for Open Access Books | CCC’s Beyond the Book

“A two-year research project funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council reported in 2017 on the ominous health of academic book publishing. As the number of titles sold rose by nearly half, from 43,000 to 63,000 between 2005 and 2014, unit sales in the same period for academic books fell 13%, from 4.34 million copies to 3.76 million annually, a drop of nearly 600,000. According to a report in the Times of London Higher Education Supplement, that drop meant average sales per title fell from 100 to 60 books.

Any effort to save scholarly monograph publishing will rely on usage data, though that remains hard to come by. With a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Book Industry Study Group and several other collaborators in the US and the UK recently undertook a review of factors holding back adoption of e-book monographs. The conclusion – granular and comparable data on users and usage of such works is needed to justify not only publishing programs, but also research activities….”

Horizon 2020 and UK Research and Innovation Requirements for H2020 Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

“Twice a year, Jisc contacts Horizon2020-funded projects in the UK on behalf of OpenAIRE (www.openaire.eu) which supports the EC’s Open Access policies.  Jisc is the National Open Access Desk for OpenAIRE in the UK, and we contact project coordinators because there are particular Open Access obligations within most of the Horizon2020 projects for the EC:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions.
Open Research Data Pilot: Projects in designated areas of H2020 will participate in a pilot project to make the underlying data related to project outputs openly available and accessible for use by other researchers, innovative industries and citizens.  If you have signed up to the pilot, you will need to make your research data openly available, as well.

How many OA publications does your project have? Take a look at your project page at: https://explore.openaire.eu/search/find/projects. You can use this page to help you with reporting!…”

Resisting big data exploitations in public healthcare: Free riding or distributive justice? – Vezyridis – – Sociology of Health & Illness – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  We draw on findings from qualitative interviews with health data researchers, GPs and citizens who opted out from NHS England’s care.data programme to explore controversies and negotiations around data sharing in the NHS. Drawing on theoretical perspectives from science and technology studies, we show that the new socio?technical, ethical and economic arrangements were resisted not only on the basis of individual autonomy and protection from exploitation, but also as a collective effort to protect NHS services and patient data. We argue that the resulting opt?outs were a call for more personal control over data use. This was not because these citizens placed their personal interests above those of society. It was because they resisted proposed arrangements by networks of stakeholders, not seen as legitimate, to control flows and benefits of NHS patient data. Approaching informed consent this way helps us to explore resistance as a collective action for influencing the direction of such big data programmes towards the preservation of public access to healthcare as well as the distribution of ethical decision?making between independent, trustworthy institutions and individual citizens.