The Swiss National Strategy on Open Access and its Action Plan – EasyBlog

A year ago, the action plan for the Swiss National Strategy on Open Access has been approved by the plenary assembly of swissuniversities and has been subsequently endorsed by the governing board of the Swiss University Conference. Swiss Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are the key players in the implementation process of the national strategy, so the aim of the action plan was to provide them with options and concrete solutions to achieve the objectives that came with adopting the strategy….

According to the “Vision 2024” underlying the national strategy, all scholarly publications resulting from publicly funded research must be freely available on the internet and, moreover, that all scholarly publications in Switzerland should be 100% Open Access within a landscape of mixed Open Access models by 2024….

National contract negotiations with the major publishers Springer NatureWiley and Elsevier under the auspices of swissuniversities are significant action items regarding a unified approach. The focus of the negotiation strategy will be on the “Read & Publish” model as a favoured negotiation approach with the goal to gain transparent pricing and greater accessibility to publications (see also the factsheet for details)….”

Deal reveals what scientists in Germany are paying for open access | Science | AAAS

Project Deal, a consortium of libraries, universities, and research institutes in Germany, has unveiled an unprecedented deal with a major journal publisher—Wiley—that is drawing close scrutiny from advocates of open access to scientific papers….

Now, the numbers are out. Germany will pay Wiley €2750 for each paper published in one of the publisher’s so-called hybrid journals, which contain both paywalled and free papers. The contract anticipates researchers will publish about 9500 such papers per year, at a cost of €26 million. In addition, researchers will get a 20% discount on the price of publishing in Wiley journals that are already open access.

 

The deal is an important step toward more open access in scientific publishing, but the per paper fee of €2750 seems high, says Leo Waaijers, an open-access advocate and retired librarian at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Dutch researchers are paying Wiley just €1600 per paper under a similar deal in the Netherlands, he notes. “It’s the same process, the same product, so why the price difference?” he says….

The fact that the details of the German contract have become public is also important, Borrell-Damian says. “Contracts should be public because this is about public money spent,” she says. And if other countries sign similar deals, and the details become public, then “the whole game of price comparison may start,” Waaijers says. And that, open-access advocates say, could produce pressure for even lower publishing fees.”

Wiley Contract – Projekt DEAL

“We are happy to publish here the full text of the “Publish&Read” agreement between Project DEAL and Wiley signed 15th January 2019.

The forward-looking “Publish&Read” model at the basis of the agreement delivers the benefits of open access to authors and advances the principles of open science by enabling institutions and researchers alike to make the most of the opportunities that open dissemination in our digital environment provides….”

Wiley strikes open access deal with German universities and libraries | News | Chemistry World

German academic institutions have reached a ‘ground breaking’ nationwide deal to allow their researchers to make their work freely available around the world in journals published by Wiley – at no extra cost. For an agreed annual fee they’ll also have access to all Wiley’s content back to 1997.

Nearly three years ago, Project Deal – which represents 700 universities, libraries and research institutions – decided to take on the major scientific publishers in an attempt to secure a new type of contract they called ‘publish and read’. Talks reached a stalemate with the largest publisher, Elsevier, last June, while negotiations with Springer Nature are still going on. Horst Hippler, chief negotiator for Project Deal, is now ‘convinced the others will follow’….”

Where are we now?

“The results of publicly funded research must be freely available to all. By 2020, universities want to make all peer-reviewed articles by Dutch researchers open-access publications as standard. Following a request by the government, in 2013 the VSNU formulated a plan to achieve this goal.

‘The Dutch universities’ strategy is unique on the international stage,’ says Koen Becking, executive open-access negotiator for the VSNU and Executive Board President at Tilburg University. Together with Tim van der Hagen, Executive Board President at Delft University of Technology, and Anton Pijpers, Executive Board President at Utrecht University, he leads executive negotiations with the major publishing houses….

The Dutch approach is such a success because the universities have formed a single negotiating body and are supported by the government. In this regard, Becking refers to the government’s open-access policy, which was continued by the new government in 2017….”

 

Wiley in ‘transformative’ partnership with German academic institutions | The Bookseller

“Wiley has signed what it describes as a “transformative” partnership with Projekt DEAL, which represents nearly 700 academic institutions in Germany.

The three-year agreement means that, for an annual fee, all those 700 institutions will have access to read Wiley’s academic journals dating back to 1997, while researchers at the institutions can publish articles open access with Wiley journals. The publisher said the partnership would “better support institutions and researchers in advancing open science, driving discovery, and developing and disseminating knowledge.”  …”

Groundbreaking deal makes large number of German studies free to public | Science | AAAS

Three years ago, a group of German libraries, universities, and research institutes teamed up to force the three largest scientific publishers to offer an entirely new type of contract. In exchange for an annual lump sum, they wanted a nationwide agreement making papers by German authors free to read around the world, while giving researchers in Germany access to all of the publishers’ online content.

Today, after almost 3 years of negotiations, the consortium, named Project DEAL, can finally claim a success: This morning, it signed a deal with Wiley, an academic publisher headquartered in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Under the 3-year contract, scientists at more than 700 academic institutions will be able to access all of Wiley’s academic journals back to 1997 and to publish open access in all of Wiley’s journals. The annual fee will be based on the number of papers they publish in Wiley journals—about 10,000 in previous years, says one of the negotiators, physicist Gerard Meijer of the Fritz Haber Institute, a Max Planck Society institute here….

The deal will likely turn up the pressure on Elsevier and Springer, the other two publishers Project DEAL has been negotiating with….”

Pay to Publish Open Access: On the DEAL-Wiley Agreement

“On Tuesday, 15th January, the German consortium DEAL and Wiley announced the signing of a new contract. This was immediately hailed as groundbreaking and transformative. Indeed, this is the first deal of its kind, aiming to foster the large-scale adoption of open access in journal publishing. Yet, details of the contract reveal that the transformative nature of this new big deal may come at a high cost: for the forthcoming period of three years, the scenario will be gradual hybrid instead of revolutionary gold open access. This may result in a costly pay to publish development….”

2018 in review: Working towards an open scholarly world | About Hindawi

Consistent with our mission to drive greater openness in research, in September of this year we released a new peer review system that has been built using an open-source framework. The new platform was developed as part of our collaboration with the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko) and was the first step towards a network of open publishing infrastructure that we, Coko, and other like-minded organizations like eLife and University of California Press are developing and plan to share with the research community. An earnest commitment to openness can only be built on open scholarly infrastructure….”