IRUS-UK Newsletter, June 2020

“IRUS-UK collects raw usage data from UK Institutional Repositories (IRs) and processes these data into COUNTERconformant statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based data and opportunities for profiling at a national level. The IRUS-UK service is a community-driven development, responding to user needs….

In response to your feedback, the current Shibboleth authorisation mechanism will be removed so that the IRUS web portal is fully open and supports easier access to data and tools….”

Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP)

“Montana State University, the Association of Research Libraries, the University of New Mexico, and OCLC Research have joined as partners to examine the difficulties that libraries face in producing accurate reports on the use of their digital repositories.

The Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that improves the accuracy of institutional repository (IR) analytics and provides IR managers with the following capabilities:

Persistent access to accurate counts of file downloads from IR.
Implementation with minimal training or configuration.
The potential to aggregate IR metrics across organizations for consistent benchmarking and analysis….”

Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP)

“Montana State University, the Association of Research Libraries, the University of New Mexico, and OCLC Research have joined as partners to examine the difficulties that libraries face in producing accurate reports on the use of their digital repositories.

The Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that improves the accuracy of institutional repository (IR) analytics and provides IR managers with the following capabilities:

Persistent access to accurate counts of file downloads from IR.
Implementation with minimal training or configuration.
The potential to aggregate IR metrics across organizations for consistent benchmarking and analysis….”

Preprinting a pandemic: the role of preprints in the COVID-19 pandemic | bioRxiv

Abstract:  The world continues to face an ongoing viral pandemic that presents a serious threat to human health. The virus underlying the COVID-19 disease, SARS-CoV-2, has caused over 3.2 million confirmed cases and 220,000 deaths between January and April 2020. Although the last pandemic of respiratory disease of viral origin swept the globe only a decade ago, the way science operates and responds to current events has experienced a paradigm shift in the interim. The scientific community has responded rapidly to the COVID-19 pandemic, releasing over 16,000 COVID-19 related scientific articles within 4 months of the first confirmed case, of which at least 6,000 were hosted by preprint servers. We focused our analysis on bioRxiv and medRxiv, two growing preprint servers for biomedical research, investigating the attributes of COVID-19 preprints, their access and usage rates, characteristics of their sharing on online platforms, and the relationship between preprints and their published articles. Our data provides evidence for increased scientific and public engagement (COVID-19 preprints are accessed and distributed at least 15 times more than non-COVID-19 preprints) and changes in journalistic practice with reference to preprints. We also find evidence for changes in preprinting and publishing behaviour: COVID-19 preprints are shorter, with fewer panels and tables, and reviewed faster. Our results highlight the unprecedented role of preprints and preprint servers in the dissemination of COVID-19 science, and the likely long-term impact of the pandemic on the scientific publishing landscape.

 

Jisc and LYRASIS help US universities and research organisations gather new usage insights | Jisc

“Jisc and LYRASIS, a global non-profit membership association providing technology and content solutions for libraries, museums, and archives, are joining forces to introduce Institutional Repository Usage Statistics (IRUS) in the United States. 

IRUS-US is the first service to bring together standards-based usage statistics of participating repositories in the US. The service will enable US repositories to provide and gather comparable usage data, while also giving them the opportunity to benchmark usage at an international level. …”

Igniting Change: Our Next Steps Towards Open Data Metrics

“Since 2014, the Make Data Count (MDC) initiative has focused on building the social and technical infrastructure for the development of research data metrics. With funding from the National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the initiative has transformed from a research project with an aim to understand what researchers value about their data, to an infrastructure development project, and now into a full-fledged adoption initiative.  The team is proud to announce additional funding from the Sloan Foundation to focus on widespread adoption of standardized data usage and data citation practices, the building blocks for open research data metrics.”

Developing a Pilot Data Trust for Open Access Ebook Usage (subcontract) | Educopia Institute

“This project will put into action the recommendations of the white paper “Exploring Open Access Ebook Usage,” published by the Book Industry Study Group in May 2019 with support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, by building a pilot data trust for usage data on open access (OA) monographs. As an international cooperative managed by the community of stakeholders in scholarly communications and operating a secure data repository and member dashboards, this data trust will be designed to align with the priorities of authors and institutions while respecting emerging ethical norms in the use of metrics.

For more information, see the narrative of the grant proposal.

As a partner on this project, Educopia will facilitate development of a governance structure and legal architecture for the data trust and employ the community liaison….”