Revisiting the Open Access Citation Advantage for Legal Scholarship

“Citation studies in law have shown a significant citation advantage for open access legal scholarship. A recent cross-disciplinary study, however, gave opposite results. This article shows how methodology, including the definition of open access and the source of the citation data, can affect the results of open access citation studies.”

Revisiting the Open Access Citation Advantage for Legal Scholarship

“Citation studies in law have shown a significant citation advantage for open access legal scholarship. A recent cross-disciplinary study, however, gave opposite results. This article shows how methodology, including the definition of open access and the source of the citation data, can affect the results of open access citation studies.”

International observatory targets predatory publishers | Times Higher Education (THE)

“A coalition of scientists, funders, publishing societies and librarians believes that the formation of an international observatory to study predatory journals will lead to improved advice on how to tackle them.

The initiative aims to fill the void left by the closure three years ago of Jeffrey Beall’s blacklist of predatory publishers. Since then, many others have set up their own blacklists and checklists, but there is “a lack of unity across the community about what predatory journals are”, said Agnes Grudniewicz, assistant professor at the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa.

The coalition’s biggest achievement so far is to create a consensus definition of predatory journals. It defines predatory journals and publishers as “entities that prioritise self-interest at the expense of scholarship” and “are characterised by false or misleading information, deviation from best editorial and publication practices, a lack of transparency, and/or the use of aggregate and indiscriminate solicitation practices”….

Creating an international observatory – potentially funded by research funders, charities, publishers and research institutions – was a less contentious solution than relying on blacklists or “whitelists” of approved providers, said Dr Grudniewicz. Research led by Michaela Strinzel, from the Swiss National Science Foundation, found that 34 journals listed as predatory by Professor Beall appeared on an approved list of titles run by the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), while 31 DOAJ titles were deemed predatory by subscription service Cabells….”

Why “what is a preprint?” is the wrong question | NISO website

“At ASAPbio, we’ve generally defined a preprint as an article that has yet to see the completion of journal-organized peer review. But this definition is imperfect (as we’ll discuss below) and isn’t universally shared. For example, an authoritative resource on journal preprint policies, SHERPA-RoMEO, says in its FAQ, “Publishers may use the term pre-print to define all forms of the article prior to print publication. SHERPA follows an academic practise of defining pre-prints as a draft of an academic article or other publication before it has been submitted for peer-review or other quality assurance procedure as part of the publication process.” bioRxiv’s policies resemble (but don’t exactly match) SHERPA’s first definition: it hosts scientific manuscripts prior to journal acceptance. And, adding to the mix, at the NFAIS Foresight Event on preprints, Kent Anderson used the term to refer to manuscript he’d circulated privately to colleagues, but not posted publicly. Chiarelli et al have proposed six values that factor into varied definitions of the term, summarized in figure 1….”

Open Science: a review of definitions with a regional perspective – Impakter

“This document provides a preliminary organized selection of definitions of Open Science. In approaching the concept, the first question to be addressed is what is meant with it, what is its scope, what are the existent approaches. There are a number of different answers to this question, thus, while this document’s aim is not to come up with an exact definition, but collect the main ones according to specific criteria….”

Open Science: a review of definitions with a regional perspective – Impakter

“This document provides a preliminary organized selection of definitions of Open Science. In approaching the concept, the first question to be addressed is what is meant with it, what is its scope, what are the existent approaches. There are a number of different answers to this question, thus, while this document’s aim is not to come up with an exact definition, but collect the main ones according to specific criteria….”

Predatory journals: no definition, no defence

“The consensus definition reached was: “Predatory journals and publishers are entities that prioritize self-interest at the expense of scholarship and are characterized by false or misleading information, deviation from best editorial and publication practices, a lack of transparency, and/or the use of aggressive and indiscriminate solicitation practices.” …”

Tutorial 19g: Open Access definitions and clarifications, part 7: why your open-access journal should use the CC By licence | Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week

“Matt and I are about to submit a paper. One of the journals we considered — and would have really liked in many respects — turned out to use the CC By-NC-SA license. This is a a very well-intentioned licence that allows free use except for commercial purposes, and which imposes the same licence on all derivative works. While that sounds good, there are solid reasons to prefer the simpler CC By licence. I wrote to the journal in question advocating a switch to CC By, and then I thought the reasoning might be of broader interest. So here’s what I wrote, lightly edited….”