Save Tonight (and Fight the Rot of Bits): Open Access and Digital Preservation – Scholarly Communication in Raiderland

“I am writing to you about digital preservation, but this is a scholarly communication blog. So, let’s delve into what preservation has to do with open access. SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) defines open access as ‘the free, immediate, online availability of research articles, coupled with the rights to uses these articles fully in the digital environment.‘ The simple answer to what digital preservation has to do with access is that we are not only advocating for open access in the here and now but also for continued access in years to come.

In the traditional sense of open access, I will encourage you to pay attention to what open access publishers say about what they intend to do with the work that you submit to them. LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) and CLOCKSS (Controlled LOCKSS) are examples of programs designed to provide publishers with digital preservation tools and networks to ensure the safety of their content. If you are submitting your articles to a publisher who is openly involved with LOCKSS or CLOCKSS, then you can be reasonably assured that they have your best preservation interests at heart. But they’re not the only tools available to publishers, so be a good investigator when you explore your publication possibilities.

This introduction is the first part of two posts about digital preservation and access. Look out for the next post with four simple rules for incorporating digital preservation into your personal research routine.”

 

Budapest Open Access Initiative | Open Access: Toward the Internet of the Mind

“On February 14, 2002, a small text of fewer than a thousand words quietly appeared on the Web: titled the “Budapest Open Access Initiative” (BOAI), it gave a public face to discussions between sixteen participants that had taken place on December 1 and 2, 2001 in Budapest, at the invitation of the Open Society Foundations (then known as the Open Society Institute)….Wedding the old – the scientific ethos – with the new – computers and the Internet – elicited a powerful, historically grounded synthesis that gave gravitas to the BOAI. In effect, the Budapest Initiative stated, Open Access was not the hastily cobbled up conceit of a small, marginal band of scholars and scientists dissatisfied with their communication system; instead, it asserted anew the central position of communication as the foundation of the scientific enterprise. Communication, as William D. Harvey famously posited, is the “essence of science,” and thanks to the Internet, scientific communication could be further conceived as the distributed system of human intelligence….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15

“The 15th anniversary of the BOAI offers an opportunity to take stock of our collective progress. To do this, feedback was solicited through an open survey, and we received responses from 69 countries around the world. Additionally, we have convened a small working group to synthesize the community feedback and use it to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. The Working Group will review and digest the responses received and provide updated recommendations to reflect the current status of the movement. Later this week, we’re looking forward to the release of a comprehensive reflection on where the open access movement has been and where it may be headed, written by Jean-Claude Guédon, one of the original drafters of the BOAI, and a noted thought leader in the open access community. In the meantime, watch the BOAI 15 twitter feed (@TheBOAI) and #TheBOAI starting today for a series of tweets showcasing some of the reactions collected from the wider Open community on the impact of the BOAI and on open access in general. As recommendations are formulated, these will be supplemented with more action-oriented items from members of the BOAI 15 Working Group….”

Journal.fi – New portal for Finnish scholarly Open Access journals? | Archivalia

“„Journal.fi is a new portal for Finnish scholarly Open Access Journals provided by the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies“ (aalto.fi via OATP). This is Fake news!

http://journal.fi/virittaja/article/view/40155 isn’t available Open Access because viewing the PDF is only possible with a login. And you need to see the PDF because the e-text is lacking the German UMLAUTE (ä, ö, ü). It is not clear if the text on the page is the whole text of the article, but in the case of http://journal.fi/virittaja/article/view/52698 (2016) it is clear that only the abstract is free. „Virittäjä“ is a subscription journal….

Some journals [at the site] are Open Access, some not.”

The Data Spectrum | Open Data Institute

“Some of us worry about personal health records being “made open”. Some confuse commercial and personal data, or mix up “big data” with “open data”.

To unpack data’s challenges and its benefits, we need to be precise about what these things mean. They should be clear and familiar to everyone, so we can all have informed conversations about how we use them, how they affect us and how we plan for the future….

Whether big, medium or small, whether state, commercial or personal, the important thing about data is how it is licensed.

The spectrum ranges from closed to shared to open….”

Freier Zugang schafft mehr Wissen – BMBF

English Translation (Google): Free access creates more knowledge

“Das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) startet heute eine umfassende Open Access-Strategie.”

English Translation (Google): “The Federal Ministry of Education and Research ( BMBF ) to start a comprehensive open access strategy today.”