South African Government places DOAJ on list of accredited journals – DOAJ News Service

“DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) is pleased to announce its inclusion in the recognised list of journals, lists and indexes accepted by the South African Department of Higher Education and Training. The move represents the first time that an open access listing has been recommended to South African University academics, encouraging researchers to publish in open access and make use of the free quality content available on DOAJ….

Articles published in DOAJ journals by South African scholars, will receive publishing points. Only articles published in approved scholarly journals can be subsidised by the Department of Higher Education and Training. …”

South African Government places DOAJ on list of accredited journals – DOAJ News Service

“DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) is pleased to announce its inclusion in the recognised list of journals, lists and indexes accepted by the South African Department of Higher Education and Training. The move represents the first time that an open access listing has been recommended to South African University academics, encouraging researchers to publish in open access and make use of the free quality content available on DOAJ….

Articles published in DOAJ journals by South African scholars, will receive publishing points. Only articles published in approved scholarly journals can be subsidised by the Department of Higher Education and Training. …”

DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings | Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN)

“DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings” by Carina Bossu and Viviane Vladimirschi was presented at the 2 March 2021 GO-GN webinar. Blog posts:

Proyecto DEI en Latinoamérica: Plan y resultados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/proyecto-dei-en-latinoamerica-plan-y-resultados-preliminares/
Projeto DEI na América Latina–Plano e dados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/projeto-dei-na-america-latina-plano-e-dados-preliminares/
DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings: http://go-gn.net/webinars/dei-project-in-latin-america-plan-and-preliminary-findings/

DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings | Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN)

“DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings” by Carina Bossu and Viviane Vladimirschi was presented at the 2 March 2021 GO-GN webinar. Blog posts:

Proyecto DEI en Latinoamérica: Plan y resultados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/proyecto-dei-en-latinoamerica-plan-y-resultados-preliminares/
Projeto DEI na América Latina–Plano e dados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/projeto-dei-na-america-latina-plano-e-dados-preliminares/
DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings: http://go-gn.net/webinars/dei-project-in-latin-america-plan-and-preliminary-findings/

A reproducible picture of open access… | Wellcome Open Research

Abstract:  Background: Open data on the locations and services provided by health facilities have, in some countries, allowed the development of software tools contributing to COVID-19 response. The UN and WHO encourage countries to make health facility location data open, to encourage use and improvement. We provide a summary of open access health facility location data in Africa using re-useable R code. We aim to support data analysts developing software tools to address COVID-19 response in individual countries. In Africa there are currently three main sources of such open data; 1) direct from national ministries of health, 2) a database for sub-Saharan Africa collated and published by a team from KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme and now hosted by WHO, and 3) The Global Healthsites Mapping Project in collaboration with OpenStreetMap.     

Methods: We searched for and documented official national facility location data that were openly available. We developed re-useable open-source R code to summarise and visualise facility location data by country from the three sources. This re-useable code is used to provide a web user interface allowing data exploration through maps and plots of facility type.

Results: Out of 52 African countries, seven currently provide an official open facility list that can be downloaded and analysed reproducibly. Considering all three sources, there are over 185,000 health facility locations available for Africa. However, there are differences and overlaps between sources and a lack of data on capacities and service provision.

Conclusions: These summaries and software tools can be used to encourage greater use of existing health facility location data, incentivise further improvements in the provision of those data by national suppliers, and encourage collaboration within wider data communities. The tools are a part of the afrimapr project, actively developing R building blocks to facilitate the use of health data in Africa.

To Prevent the Resurgence of the Pandemic, Can We Talk About Open-Source Research? – Center for Economic and Policy Research

“But suppose Pfizer, Moderna, and the rest insist they are not selling, or at least not at a reasonable price. Then we go route two. We offer big bucks directly to the people who have this knowledge. Suppose we offer $5-$10 million to key engineers for a couple of months to work with engineers around the world. Yeah, Pfizer and Moderna can sue them. We’ll pick up the tab for their legal fees and any money they could lose in settlements. The sums involved are trivial relative to lives that could be saved and the damage prevented by more rapid diffusion of the vaccines.

If these companies actually pursued lawsuits it would also be a great teaching opportunity. It would show the world how single-mindedly these companies pursue profits and how incredibly corrupting the current system of patent monopoly financing is.

Okay, but let’s say we can overcome the obstacles and get the knowledge from these companies freely dispensed around the world. We still have the claim that there are physical limits to how rapidly vaccines can be produced.

There are two points here. First, while there clearly are limits, we can still move more quickly in the relevant time frame. No one had vaccines in March of 2019, but the leading producers had the capacity to produce tens of millions of doses a month by November, a period of less than eight months….”

Case study: Disseminating early research findings to influence decision-makers | UCL Open@UCL Blog

“Recently a researcher asked for our advice on the best way to disseminate her preliminary findings from a cross-disciplinary research project on COVID-19. She wanted to ensure policy makers in East Africa had immediate access to the findings so that they could make informed decisions. The researcher was aware that traditional models of publishing were not appropriate, not simply because of the length of time it generally takes for an article to be peer-reviewed and published, but because the findings would, most likely, be inaccessible to her intended audience in a subscription-based journal.

The Research Support and Open Access team advised the researcher to take a two-pronged approach which would require her to: (1) upload the working paper with the preliminary findings in a subject-specific open-access preprint service; and (2) to publicise the research findings in an online platform that is both credible and open access. We suggested she use SocArXiv and publish a summary of her findings in The Conversation Africa, which has a special section on COVID-19. The Conversation has several country-specific editions for Australia, Canada English, Canada French, France, Global Perspectives, Indonesia, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States, and is a useful vehicle to get academic research read by decision makers and the members of the public. We also suggested that the researcher publicise the research on the IOE London Blog….”

An analysis of the factors affecting open access to research output in institutional repositories in selected universities in East Africa | JLSC

Kakai, M., 2021. An analysis of the factors affecting open access to research output in institutional repositories in selected universities in East Africa. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, 9(1), p.eP2276. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2276

Abstract: Institutional repositories (IRs) present universities with an opportunity to provide global open access (OA) to their scholarship, however, this avenue was underutilised in two of the three universities in this study. This study aimed at proposing interventions to improve access to research output in IRs in universities in East Africa, and it adds to the depth of knowledge on IRs by pointing out the factors that limit OA in IRs, some of which include lack of government and funder support for OA and mediated content collection workflows that hardly involved seeking author permission to self-archive. METHODS A mixed methods approach, following a concurrent strategy was used to investigate the low level of OA in IRs. Data was collected from three purposively selected IRs in universities in East Africa, using self-administered questionnaires from 183 researchers and face-to-face interviews from six librarians. results The findings revealed that content was collected on a voluntary basis, with most of the research output deposited in the IR without the authors’ knowledge. The respondents in this study were, however, supportive of the activities of the IR, and would participate in providing research output in the IR as OA if required to do so. CONCLUSION The low level of OA in IRs in universities in East Africa could be increased by improving the IR workflow, collection development, and marketing processes. Self-archiving could be improved by increasing the researchers’ awareness and knowledge of OA and importance of IRs, while addressing their concerns about copyright infringement.

KEL and SPARC Launch “Unsettling Knowledge Inequities” Podcast – SPARC

“SPARC has partnered with the Knowledge Equity Lab to launch a new podcast called Unsettling Knowledge Inequities, which will explore issues related to the politics of knowledge production, exchange, and circulation as well as the structural, global power dynamics that shape it.

Launching today with its first episode and new episodes each Tuesday, the project will have an initial 5 episode season featuring conversations with diverse and multigenerational knowledge holders from Canada, Peru, Nigeria, Uganda, the US, and more. 

What do equitable systems for creating & sharing knowledge look like? Which types of knowledge are valued? Which are excluded? Who decides? These are just a few of the questions that the podcast will discuss in upcoming episodes….”