Why has SAGE apparently shuttered over a quarter of the Libertas Academica journals it acquired in 2016?

“In September 2016 Sage announced that it had acquired the full journal portfolio of the open access publisher Libertas Academica (LA), which it said consisted of 83 titles….

What the press release did not say is that Libertas Academica had at one time been on Beall’s list of “Potential, possible, or probable predatory” publishers….

[David Ross, SAGE Publishing’s Executive Director of Open Access] added, “I can assure you that the standards of the journals published … would satisfy even the most stringent definitions of peer review.”

Why then last Friday did the archival service PORTICO announce that 21 LA journals have been “triggered” in Portico as they are “no longer available through any online platform.” I take this to mean that the journals have been discontinued….”

Sage is latest publisher to warn of China censorship pressures

“Another leading academic publisher has been warned that it may have to censor in China or be forced out of the market, as Beijing intensifies its control over foreign education and publishing.

Sage Publishing, a US-based company that produces more than 1,000 academic journals, said it had not yet received a formal request to “remove or block access to certain documents or content within China”….

China has extended its censorship campaign to foreign publishers this year, as part of President Xi Jinping’s wider crackdown on dissent and criticism. Before Sage, only three other global academic publishers have admitted to facing pressure from Beijing’s censors.

The International Publishers’ Association, a global trade body, said that China was putting the industry in an “impossible situation” where publishers must compromise their commitment to free speech or risk losing access to one of the world’s biggest markets.
 
The climate of fear is spreading beyond China, with Allen & Unwin, a prominent Australian publisher, recently dropping a book about rising Chinese influence in Australia because of concerns about possible reprisals from Beijing….”
 

Sage is latest publisher to warn of China censorship pressures

“Another leading academic publisher has been warned that it may have to censor in China or be forced out of the market, as Beijing intensifies its control over foreign education and publishing.

Sage Publishing, a US-based company that produces more than 1,000 academic journals, said it had not yet received a formal request to “remove or block access to certain documents or content within China”….

China has extended its censorship campaign to foreign publishers this year, as part of President Xi Jinping’s wider crackdown on dissent and criticism. Before Sage, only three other global academic publishers have admitted to facing pressure from Beijing’s censors.

The International Publishers’ Association, a global trade body, said that China was putting the industry in an “impossible situation” where publishers must compromise their commitment to free speech or risk losing access to one of the world’s biggest markets.
 
The climate of fear is spreading beyond China, with Allen & Unwin, a prominent Australian publisher, recently dropping a book about rising Chinese influence in Australia because of concerns about possible reprisals from Beijing….”
 

Sharing Is Daring | Stanford Social Innovation Review

“The sequence of the human genome, completed in 2001, was supposed to quickly reveal the secrets of health and disease. Instead, it showed that human bodies are more complicated than anyone realized. Disease is usually caused not by one bad gene, but by subtle variations in dozens or hundreds of genes working with and against each other in vast networks.

This discovery delivered a reality check to genome scientist Eric Schadt. Pharmaceutical giant Merck had spent hundreds of millions of dollars…”

Current situation

“A chronological overview of important Dutch open access and open science successes….”

Impact of Social Sciences – SAGE Open five years on: Lessons learned and future thoughts on open access in humanities and social sciences.

“SAGE Open is celebrating its 5th birthday. When SAGE Publishing launched SAGE Open in 2010, the humanities and social sciences were still grappling with how to approach open access (OA). Through its mega-journal, well over 1000 articles have now been published OA, and it is one of SAGE’s most-used journals. Dave Ross looks back at the journal’s growth and lessons learned.”