Policy on Open Access | Cancer Research UK

“Our open access policy

As a CRUK-funded researcher, we:

  • Require electronic copies of any research papers that have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, and which acknowledge CRUK funding, to be made available through Europe PubMed Central(link is external) (Europe PMC) as soon as possible and no later than 6 months after publication.

  • Encourage you to select publishing routes that ensure the work is available immediately on publication in its final published form, wherever such options exist for their journal of choice and are compliant with our policy*.

  • Encourage, and where an article processing charge is paid, require, you to license research papers using the Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC-BY)(link is external)**, so they may be freely copied and reused (for example, for text- and data-mining purposes), providing that the original authors are properly credited. …”

Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy – Creative Commons

“The new book Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, edited by Rajiv Jhangiani and Robert Biswas-Diener, features the work of open advocates around the world, including Cable Green, Director of Open Education at Creative Commons. This excerpt from his chapter, ‘Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy,’ provides a summary of open licensing for education, as well as delves into the philosophical and technical underpinnings of his work in ‘open.’

Read and download the entire book via Ubiquity Press and follow Cable on Twitter @cgreen.”

Data mining astronomical records fails to falsify Einstein | Ars Technica

“Observing orbits around a black hole would take a career’s worth of measurements and, frankly, who has the time? It is also a rare benefactor who will fund a couple of decades worth of telescope time. Luckily, telescopes have been collecting data for a while, and some of that happens to include the vicinity of some black holes. Recently, some scientists decided to dig up the data and test general relativity in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole….This silent revolution is spreading to every branch of science, but we are only really scratching the surface of what might be hidden in the vast reams of digitized data. Scientists can now imagine conducting experiments that, a decade ago, might have taken an entire career of observations for one data point. Today, the data may already exist and, most importantly, be accessible. In this respect, the open data movement is probably one of the more important recent developments in science.

In astronomy, the number of eyes pointed at the heavens is increasing. The sensitivity of those eyes is getting better. Once the observations are consistently documented, we will have a treasure trove of data for future generations. We will be able to test our theories of the Universe with exquisite precision….”

Steady Growth of Articles in Fully OA Journals Using a CC-BY License – OASPA

“CC BY in fully open access journals is by far the dominant article type published by OASPA members. However, there is a notable increase in CC BY articles published in hybrid journals, as well as articles published under a CC BY-NC license in fully OA journals, pointing to an increase in articles published as OA generally.

Usage of the CC BY-NC-SA license has fallen in both hybrid and fully-OA journals published by OASPA members….”

Openness, Permission, Courtesy and Nuances of Licenses – ProfHacker – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“I have noticed before people on Flickr who give their work a CC license and then complain that folks take their photos without informing them (attribution, yes; informing/thanking, no). Sure, it’s good courtesy to thank folks if you use their photos, but such a hassle to do it for each photo you use on a slide deck or such. The whole point of using CC licensed stuff is to not always ask permission. That’s what the CC license is. Permission to anyone. To do what the license permits you to do. I realized that I always ‘favorite’ any photo I’m planning to use, so I guess I’m giving the creator some kind of indication that I like their photo, but not really telling them I’m planning to use it, or how.

I remember learning this the first time someone republished something of mine without my permission. If it’s CC licensed, the whole point is to tell them they don’t need to seek permission each time. It’s good courtesy, I think, to inform the author, but it’s not necessary. But it’s complex. If a for-profit entity republished my CC-BY-NC article, but publishes it openly and for free, is that a commercial use? What if the space has ads on it, is that a commercial use? If I publish my blog CC-BY and a for-profit magazine regularly republishes it, am I really OK with that? Am I OK with a magazine with values opposed to my own constantly republishing my stuff without my permission? What about if they take derivatives of my writing and use it in a different context, to really make an opposing point to mine, is that acceptable to me? These are not trivial questions, I think, for openness advocates to ask themselves.”

Text mining: ©, CC-BY or CC-0? (with tweets) · cshperspectives · Storify

A Twitter dialog between Richard Sever and John Wilbanks on whether text mining requires CC-BY, or any other particular open license, or whether it merely requires access to the text and the existing principle (of US copyright law) protecting the extraction of uncopyrightable facts from copyrighted texts. Wilbanks asserts the latter.

New services to support open research – BioMed Central blog

“This service builds on our Research Data Support helpdesk, launched in July 2016, and will further help authors comply with funder policies, prepare their data for deposition in a repository and enhance their peer-reviewed publications. The service provides secure and private submission of data files, data curation and publisher-managed release of datasets. Authors will make their data openly available, under either a Creative Commons attribution license (CC BY) or the CC0 public domain waiver. The service is run by professional Research Data Editors and provided by Springer Nature in partnership with figshare….”

The Lancet journals welcome a new open access policy – The Lancet (April 2013)

“The Lancet journals welcome and support all efforts to make research more widely accessible and useable in ways that continue to sustain our broad mission to serve clinical medicine and global health. We will, in accordance with the new RCUK policy, offer either a “gold” open access choice with a creative commons license after payment of an article processing charge of US$5000, or a “green” open access solution—where authors can deposit the final accepted version of their paper in any repository they choose 6 months after publication—for all RCUK-funded research papers submitted after April 1. In addition, for the “green” open access solution we will also make the published paper free to access on our websites 6 months after publication.

These options and a choice of three different creative commons licenses (CC-BY, CC BY-NC-SA, or CC BY-NC-ND) will be open to authors of all research papers supported by those funders with whom we currently have payment agreements….”