Reimagining the Digital Monograph Design Thinking to Build New Tools for Researchers

“Digital scholarly book files should be open and flexible. This is as much a design question as it is a business question for publishers and libraries. The working group returned several times to the importance of scholarly book files being available in nonproprietary formats that allow for a variety of uses and re-uses…. Another pointed out that the backlist corpus of scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences is an invaluable resource for text-mining, but the ability to carry out that research at scale means that the underlying text of the books has to be easy to extract. “It’s so important to be able to ‘scrape’ the text,” one participant said, using a common term for gathering machine-readable characters from a human-readable artifact (for example, a scanned page image)….Whether a wider group of publishers and technology vendors will feel that they can enable these more expansive uses of a book file without upending the sustainability of the scholarly publishing system is a larger question than this project sought to answer….Our working group also pointed to other challenges for the future of the monograph that have little to do with its visual representation in a user interface: for example, what might be a viable long-term business model for monographs, and whether a greater share of the publishing of monographs in a free-to-read, open-access model can be made sustainable….As interest continues to grow in extending the open-access publishing model from journals to scholarly books, publishers and librarians are working to understand better the upfront costs that must be covered in order to operate a self-sustaining open-access monograph publishing program—costs that have been complicated to pin down because the production of any given scholarly book depends on partial allocations of staff time from many different staff members at a press, and different presses have different cost bases, as well….”

Exploiting Elsevier’s Creative Commons License Requirement to Subvert Embargo

“In the last round of author sharing policy revisions, Elsevier created a labyrinthine title-by-title embargo structure requiring embargoes from 12-48 months for author sharing via institutional repository (IR), while permitting immediate sharing via author’s personal website or blog. At the same time, all pre-publication versions are to bear a Creative Commons-Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND) license. At the time this policy was announced, it was rightly criticized by many in the scholarly communication community as overly complicated and unnecessary. However, this CC licensing requirement creates an avenue for subverting the embargo in the IR to achieve quicker open distribution of the author’s accepted manuscript. In short, authors may post an appropriately licensed copy on their personal site, at which point we may deposit without embargo in the IR, not through the license granted in the publication agreement, but through the CC license on the author’s version, which the sharing policy mandates. This poster will outline this issue, our experimentation with application, and engage viewers in questions regarding its potential risks, benefits, and workflows.”

 

Policy on Open Access | Cancer Research UK

“Our open access policy

As a CRUK-funded researcher, we:

  • Require electronic copies of any research papers that have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, and which acknowledge CRUK funding, to be made available through Europe PubMed Central(link is external) (Europe PMC) as soon as possible and no later than 6 months after publication.

  • Encourage you to select publishing routes that ensure the work is available immediately on publication in its final published form, wherever such options exist for their journal of choice and are compliant with our policy*.

  • Encourage, and where an article processing charge is paid, require, you to license research papers using the Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC-BY)(link is external)**, so they may be freely copied and reused (for example, for text- and data-mining purposes), providing that the original authors are properly credited. …”

Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy – Creative Commons

“The new book Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, edited by Rajiv Jhangiani and Robert Biswas-Diener, features the work of open advocates around the world, including Cable Green, Director of Open Education at Creative Commons. This excerpt from his chapter, ‘Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy,’ provides a summary of open licensing for education, as well as delves into the philosophical and technical underpinnings of his work in ‘open.’

Read and download the entire book via Ubiquity Press and follow Cable on Twitter @cgreen.”

UK Scholarly Communications Licence

“The UK Scholarly Communications Licence is a means by which

the University and its authors can meet funders’ requirements for

open access to their scholarly articles. It is effected through

policy rather than by actions for each article. It is an

implementation of the approach first introduced in the US by

Harvard in 2008….”

Open Access Must-Reads for Spring 2017 – Copyright Clearance Center

“Together with the Association for Learned and Professional Publishing (ALPSP), Copyright Clearance Center is excited to introduce the inaugural post of our “Open Access Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles from the past few months that expound upon “can’t miss” developments in the world of Open Access.”

DeepGreen: Open-access-Transformation | ZBW MediaTalk

“The green route (link in German) to open access describes the storage of quality-assured text publications (postprints) and other digital content in an institutional or disciplinary repository (freely accessible online database). One path on the green route is the alliance licences negotiated nationally between libraries and publishers. The open access components contained therein allow authors from academic institutions which hold the relevant rights to publish their publications immediately or following an embargo period in a repository of their choice, usually their own institution. However, implementing these open access components is a laborious process: it requires authors to upload their publication to the repository themselves at the appropriate point or the library as their institutional representative to find the article and upload it to the repository manually. Often, the relevant rights holders do not take action and the publications remain with the publisher….The aim of DeepGreen is to automatically transfer those academic publications which can be made freely available after set waiting periods according to licensing rights into open access. Automating the process should relieve the burden on academics and libraries and increase the number of open access publications available to the German academic community….”

Steady Growth of Articles in Fully OA Journals Using a CC-BY License – OASPA

“CC BY in fully open access journals is by far the dominant article type published by OASPA members. However, there is a notable increase in CC BY articles published in hybrid journals, as well as articles published under a CC BY-NC license in fully OA journals, pointing to an increase in articles published as OA generally.

Usage of the CC BY-NC-SA license has fallen in both hybrid and fully-OA journals published by OASPA members….”