Building capacity through open approaches: Lessons from developing undergraduate electrophysiology practicals

Abstract:  Electrophysiology has a wide range of biomedical research and clinical applications. As such, education in the theoretical basis and hands-on practice of electrophysiological techniques is essential for biomedical students, including at the undergraduate level. However, offering hands-on learning experiences is particularly difficult in environments with limited resources and infrastructure. In 2017, we began a project to design and incorporate electrophysiology laboratory practicals into our Biomedical Physics undergraduate curriculum at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. We describe some of the challenges we faced, how we maximized resources to overcome some of these challenges, and in particular, how we used open scholarship approaches to build both educational and research capacity. The use of open tools, open platforms, and open licenses was key to the success and broader impact of our project. We share examples of our practicals and explain how we use these activities to strengthen interdisciplinary learning, namely the application of concepts in physics to understanding functions of the human body. Our goal is to provide ideas, materials, and strategies for educators working in similar resource-limited environments.

 

Licenciamientos alternativos y tradicionales (derechos intelectuales) | OpenlabEC

From Google’s English:  “Intellectual property, and in particular copyright, is a legal area that has been greatly impacted by new technologies, and especially by public networks such as the Internet.

The purpose of this session is to review the most important aspects of intellectual property, alternative licenses such as creative commons, GPL, free culture, especially copyright, its limitations and exceptions in light of the transnational nature of the Internet.”

Open Access of COVID-19-related publications in the first quarter of 2020: a preliminary study based in PubMed

Abstract:  Background: The COVID-19 outbreak has made funders, researchers and publishers agree to have research publications, as well as other research outputs, such as data, become openly available. In this extraordinary research context of the SARS CoV-2 pandemic, publishers are announcing that their coronavirus-related articles will be made immediately accessible in appropriate open repositories, like PubMed Central (PMC), agreeing upon funders’ and researchers’ instigation.

Methods: This work uses Unpaywall, OpenRefine and PubMed to analyse the level of openness of the papers about COVID-19, published during the first quarter of 2020. It also analyses Open Access (OA) articles published about previous coronavirus (SARS CoV-1 and MERS CoV) as a means of comparison.
Results: A total of 5,611 COVID-19-related articles were analysed from PubMed. This is a much higher amount for a period of 4 months compared to those found for SARS CoV-1 and MERS during the first year of their first outbreaks (337 and 125 articles, respectively).  Regarding the levels of openness, 97.4% of the SARS CoV-2 papers are freely available; similar rates were found for the other coronaviruses. Deeper analysis showed that (i) 68.3% of articles belong to an undefined Bronze category; (ii) 72.1% of all OA papers don’t carry a specific license and in all cases where there is, half of them do not meet Open Access standards; (iii)  there is a large proportion that present a copy in a repository, in most cases in PMC, where this trend is also observed. These patterns were found to be repeated in most frequent publishers: Elsevier, Springer and Wiley.
Conclusions: Our results suggest that, although scientific production is much higher than during previous epidemics and is open, there is a caveat to this opening, characterized by the absence of fundamental elements and values ??on which Open Science is based, such as licensing.

Manifesto for EU COVID-19 Research | European Commission

“By endorsing the manifesto you commit to

Make the generated results, whether tangible or intangible, public and accessible without delay, for instance on the Horizon Results Platform, on an existing IP sharing platform, or through an existing patent pool.

Make scientific papers and research data available in open access without delay and following the FAIR principles via preprint servers or public repositories, with rights for others to build upon the publications and data and with access to the tools needed for their validation.In particular, make COVID-19 research data available through the European COVID-19 Data Platform

Where possible, grant for a limited time, non-exclusive royalty free licences on the intellectual property resulting from EU-funded research. These non-exclusive royalty free licenses shall be given in exchange for the licensees’ commitment to rapidly and broadly distribute the resulting products and services under fair and reasonable conditions to prevent, diagnose, treat and contain COVID-19.

These non-exclusive royalty free licenses shall be given in exchange for the licensees’ commitment to rapidly and broadly distribute the resulting products and services under fair and reasonable conditions to prevent, diagnose, treat and contain Covid-19….”

Cancer Reports is transitioning to Open Access—Embracing Open Science – Bansal – – Cancer Reports – Wiley Online Library

“Continuing its stride towards embracing Open Science, we are pleased to share the exciting news that Cancer Reports is transitioning to Open Access. Starting from 13th August, 2020, all articles submitted and accepted for publication in Cancer Reports will be published Open Access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. …”

Cancer Reports is transitioning to Open Access—Embracing Open Science – Bansal – – Cancer Reports – Wiley Online Library

“Continuing its stride towards embracing Open Science, we are pleased to share the exciting news that Cancer Reports is transitioning to Open Access. Starting from 13th August, 2020, all articles submitted and accepted for publication in Cancer Reports will be published Open Access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. …”

Sign the Open Covid Pledge for Research in Education | Association for Learning Technology

“We pledge to make our intellectual property openly and freely available to the world to support educators, students and decision-makers, to help educational organisations survive and thrive, and to build a fairer and more resilient education system.

We pledge – where possible – to openly license or dedicate to the public domain our intellectual property.”

Office Hours: Talking to Students about Open Licenses (20 August 2020, 2pm ET/6pm UTC) – News, Discussion, Events – Rebus Community

“In this Office Hours session, we will talk about licensing conversations within an open pedagogy framework. Creative Commons open licenses are integral to OER, but can sometimes be difficult to understand, especially when first introduced. Usually, selecting the license that is best for each creator and creation involves education and reflection. What are effective ways for talking with students about their licensing options, especially when part of an assignment or class project? Licensing intersects with many higher education issues, including privilege, and must be evaluated in each specific context. Our guests will share their experiences designing and assigning open pedagogy projects with students, and specifically how they approached questions around licensing….”

Trade policy response to COVID-19 examined in Committee report – News from Parliament – UK Parliament

“[The unanimously adopted report from the International Trade Committee] also recommends the Government consider adjusting intellectual property provisions to allow for compulsory licensing of therapeutic drugs or vaccines against COVID-19, as a means of ensuring they can be made available as quickly, widely and cheaply as possible..”

How to make open science work | Science|Business

“As open science gains momentum, universities must maintain their academic independence by arming themselves against possible takeover of critical infrastructure, research information and data by private parties.

If universities simply make their data generally available to everyone without any conditions,  commercial entities could collect that data, enrich it and build services around the data, and then make universities pay to use those services.

We subscribe to the idea that collaboration and transparency advance science. We also believe that the results of publicly funded research should be generally available. That goes for research data too. But legal issues and sovereignty issues prevent universities from sharing their data unconditionally….”