Publications | Free Full-Text | The Impact of Open Access on Teaching—How Far Have We Come? | HTML

Abstract:  This article seeks to understand how far the United Kingdom higher education (UK HE) sector has progressed towards open access (OA) availability of the scholarly literature it requires to support courses of study. It uses Google Scholar, Unpaywall and Open Access Button to identify OA copies of a random sample of articles copied under the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) HE Licence to support teaching. The quantitative data analysis is combined with interviews of, and a workshop with, HE practitioners to investigate four research questions. Firstly, what is the nature of the content being used to support courses of study? Secondly, do UK HE establishments regularly incorporate searches for open access availability into their acquisition processes to support teaching? Thirdly, what proportion of content used under the CLA Licence is also available on open access and appropriately licenced? Finally, what percentage of content used by UK HEIs under the CLA Licence is written by academics and thus has the potential for being made open access had there been support in place to enable this? Key findings include the fact that no interviewees incorporated OA searches into their acquisitions processes. Overall, 38% of articles required to support teaching were available as OA in some form but only 7% had a findable re-use licence; just 3% had licences that specifically permitted inclusion in an ‘electronic course-pack’. Eighty-nine percent of journal content was written by academics (34% by UK-based academics). Of these, 58% were written since 2000 and thus could arguably have been made available openly had academics been supported to do so.

Open Access 2.0: Rethinking Open Access

“The open access movement has empowered museums to connect with their audiences by providing unprecedented access to digital collections. Now that a number of museums have had an open access policy for the better part of a decade, how have their policies stood the test of time? How have their policies made an impact on their institutions and communities? Have standards of “openness” changed? How can policies be updated to address changes in community practice? What lessons can those still advocating for an initial open access policy at their institution learn from early innovators? Representatives from several museums with open access policies will share how their policies are evolving and lessons learned from their experiences implementing open access, and a representative from Creative Commons will give an update on the work the OpenGLAM community is doing to support open access policies….Key Outcomes: After attending this session, participants from institutions with open access policies will be ready to review their policies for areas that may need updating. Participants who are still lobbying for open access at their museum will come away with strategies for gaining institutional support for open access and crafting a policy that reflects current practice.”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Opscidia – The free open access scholarly publishing

“Our publishing platform is totally free and fully developed in Open Source.

All the articles that we publish are Open Access, published under CC-BY licence and we do not require any article-processing charges from authors….

We only publish peer-reviewed research articles selected by academic-led editorial boards. We will never exert any pressure for publishing or for rejecting any article.

The editorial board keeps ownership of the title and the brand of their journal and they are free to leave whenever they want, should they wish to do so….”

Opscidia – The free open access scholarly publishing

“Our publishing platform is totally free and fully developed in Open Source.

All the articles that we publish are Open Access, published under CC-BY licence and we do not require any article-processing charges from authors….

We only publish peer-reviewed research articles selected by academic-led editorial boards. We will never exert any pressure for publishing or for rejecting any article.

The editorial board keeps ownership of the title and the brand of their journal and they are free to leave whenever they want, should they wish to do so….”

Where Can I Publish? – Delta Think

“Last month we looked at how inclusion in the DOAJ is increasingly being used as a benchmark to identify an “acceptable” fully OA journal. The DOAJ is not an exhaustive index, as criteria for acceptability can vary between indexes and stakeholders.

Therefore, this month we look at additional indexes and journal types. We investigate whether it’s possible to find definitive information about where to publish and about which journals are fully open access….

Once we filter out duplicates, roughly one-fifth of the indexed journals appear to be fully OA. As a rough guideline, the more selective the index, the lower the proportion of fully OA journals. So, “high teens %” of journals in the broader indexes drops to “low teens %” in the more selective indexes.

However, there are some interesting mis-matches in scale of the fully OA-only indexes.

ROAD (the issn.org’s list of fully OA journals) has more journals than even the most inclusive cut of Ulrich’s. ROAD includes anything that is free to read on the web, regardless of whether its licensing or copyright terms would be considered formally to be Open Access. This roughly doubles the number of journals it includes.
Focusing on indexes with some selectivity, the DOAJ lists around 13k fully OA journals compared with Ulrich’s 9k, or around 17% of all its journals. 18% of Scopus journals are fully OA, as are 19% of Delta Think’s sample….”

RightsStatements in Wikidata

“We are pleased to report that the volunteer community behind Wikidata – the freely licensed structured database of information, sister to Wikipedia, has recently approved the creation of a dedicated metadata Property for RightsStatements. P6426 to be precise. This will increase the chances that accurate, understandable, and precise rights-labelling information about cultural heritage works will be findable by end-users.

Here Liam Wyatt explains how this change came about, and what it means for cultural heritage organisations around the world who contribute items to Wikidata….”

Rate of growth for CC BY articles in fully-OA journals continues for OASPA members – OASPA

Two charts. One shows that full (non-hybrid) OA journals use CC-BY far more often than they use any other open license, and far more often hybrid journals use CC-BY. The other shows that even among hybrid journals, CC-BY is more common than any other open license. 

Genetics Research turns a new [open access] leaf… | Genetics Research | Cambridge Core

“[W]e are delighted to announce that from January 2019, Genetics Research will convert to the open access model of publication. Genetics is an area where both authors and funders are showing substantial support for Open Access, with increasing author uptake of OA. It is our belief that converting Genetics Research to open access is the right solution for the journal and for the community. From January 2019, Genetics Research will publish all articles under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), which permits use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Subsequently, an Article Processing Charge (APC) will be payable by authors or their funder on acceptance of their primary research article. In the majority of cases, these costs are paid by the author, his or her institution, or a funder….”