News & Views: Open Access Charges – A Market Slowly Maturing – Delta Think

Over the last few years changes in numbers of journals have been less pronounced. Our samples suggest that for the major publishers, on average:

  • The number of hybrid journals has continued to increase, typically by a low single-digit percent.
  • Amongst the largest publishers, the number of fully OA journals has decreased (again by a low single-digit percent), while mid-sized publishers increased their numbers of fully OA journals.
  • This appears to be due to changes in line up of publishers’ portfolios (e.g., transfers) rather than fully OA “flipping” to hybrid.

Prices Show No Dramatic Changes

  • Maximum APCs this year have fallen slightly to $5,200 from $5,300 for non-discounted, CC BY charges. With one exception last year, this maximum has not changed over the last four years, so the top end of the market appears to be holding steady.
  • Business model is no predictor the highest prices, with both hybrid and fully OA journals asking the highest prices in different market segments.
  • At the lower end of the market, fully OA journal APCs are less expensive than hybrid, and falling. In this segment, hybrid journal APCs have increased.
  • Overall average hybrid APCs are largely holding steady and saw only the smallest of increases (less than 1%) over the last few years.
  • Contrast this with fully OA average APCs, which have been rising slowly but surely: up around 10% over the last four years and up by around 4% in the last year or so….”

News & Views: Open Access Charges – A Market Slowly Maturing – Delta Think

Over the last few years changes in numbers of journals have been less pronounced. Our samples suggest that for the major publishers, on average:

  • The number of hybrid journals has continued to increase, typically by a low single-digit percent.
  • Amongst the largest publishers, the number of fully OA journals has decreased (again by a low single-digit percent), while mid-sized publishers increased their numbers of fully OA journals.
  • This appears to be due to changes in line up of publishers’ portfolios (e.g., transfers) rather than fully OA “flipping” to hybrid.

Prices Show No Dramatic Changes

  • Maximum APCs this year have fallen slightly to $5,200 from $5,300 for non-discounted, CC BY charges. With one exception last year, this maximum has not changed over the last four years, so the top end of the market appears to be holding steady.
  • Business model is no predictor the highest prices, with both hybrid and fully OA journals asking the highest prices in different market segments.
  • At the lower end of the market, fully OA journal APCs are less expensive than hybrid, and falling. In this segment, hybrid journal APCs have increased.
  • Overall average hybrid APCs are largely holding steady and saw only the smallest of increases (less than 1%) over the last few years.
  • Contrast this with fully OA average APCs, which have been rising slowly but surely: up around 10% over the last four years and up by around 4% in the last year or so….”

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

Analyze the impact of the rising Open Access movement on your organization – Dimensions

Open Access is an integral part of the journey to a more collaborative research environment and continues to grow in importance across a variety of communities, including publishers, funders, librarians and of course the academic research community. Open Access in combination with Open Data has quickly become a key issue impacting both the quantity and the quality of scholarly communications.

In this recently published Digital Science Research report, Dimensions data were used to explore the implications that restricted access may impose and analyze current Open Access trends. Some of the reports key findings include that the volume of Open Access articles has clearly been rising in recent years and that countries that have invested in Open Access have typically increased their level of international collaboration.

All this and more can be discovered through Dimensions’ rich data and analytical capabilities as we recently developed and released a number of updates and new features which will help you to gain richer and more precise insights about Open Access for your organization.

Dimensions provides multiple filters to easily display results which are Open Access. Our filters are built around the four most commonly used basic classifications:

  • Bronze – available on websites hosted by their publisher, either immediately or following an embargo, but are not formally licensed for reuse.
  • Green – freely available somewhere other than the publisher’s website, e.g. in a subject or university repository, or the author’s personal website. Applies to self-archiving generally of the pre or post-print or potentially after an embargo period
  • Gold – refers to articles in fully accessible open access journals that are available immediately upon publication without a license
  • Hybrid – refers to subscription journals with open access to individual articles usually when a fee is paid to the publisher or journal by the author, the author’s organization, or the research funder….

Say you wanted to know how many gold Open Access papers by the University of Oxford, funded by the Wellcome Trust, were published in Springer Nature journals between 2013 – 2018? We made discovering that easy as you can see in the screenshot below….”

cOAlition S: Response to PNAS | PNAS

The assertion is made that most society publishers—who currently make use of hybrid OA—will “likely be prohibited for authors with Plan S funders.” This is not correct since Plan S supports deposition of articles in repositories as an option for compliance. Indeed, in recent weeks we have seen several United Kingdom learned societies—including the Royal Society* and the Microbiology Society—adopt a Plan S-compliant model, by allowing authors to self-archive their author-accepted manuscript in a repository at the time of publication, with a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY)….

To help learned societies explore alternative revenue streams and business models, the Wellcome Trust, in partnership with United Kingdom Research and Innovation and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers, has just funded a consultancy to work with learned societies to help them adapt and thrive in a Plan S world….”

 

Reply to Kiley and Smits: Meeting Plan S’s goal of maximizing access to research | PNAS

“Thank you for recognizing the value that scholarly societies bring to the research ecosystem and the scientific enterprise as a whole—and for recognizing the importance of their financial viability (1).

And thank you for clearly stating your goal for Plan S (2). A much simpler route toward achieving your goal of maximizing access to research and allowing for artificial intelligence and text and data mining is Plan U, in which funders require that grantees deposit manuscripts on a preprint server under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY) before submission and peer review in a journal.* Plan U avoids the tremendous overhead and infrastructure needed to implement, monitor, and enforce Plan S—which entails vetting thousands of individual journals, various journal platforms, and repositories—and eliminates the need to further refine Plan S implementation guidelines, which have to date raised more questions than they answer.

Plan U would establish a far more uniform policy across a much larger group of researchers, while avoiding the need to cap article processing charges or ban hybrid journals. Such a policy is not only more inclusive, but more likely to achieve global buy-in….”

Open access ‘seems such a seismic change’ | Research Information

“There isn’t a single challenge that runs evenly across all of the disciplines, but the biggest one we’re facing is how we can make open access work in a way that preserves what’s good about current scholarly publishing activities, and is also sustainable and allows for innovation. It’s very difficult to move past open access at the moment. It seems such a seismic change in how we think about the way we publish. 

In the UK open access has largely been implemented through hybrid journals, and the recent Plan S announcement is very firmly positioned against hybrid journals – so the system is still clearly being shaken up. There may have been a sense that journal publishing had settled down into this hybrid model, but it didn’t deliver entirely on the promise of open access and allowed publishers to preserve what they were doing without having to innovate quite so much. We’re going to have to find ways of working around that. 

A particular concern for people like me, a historian working in digital humanities, is how we accommodate books in all of this. The business models for book publishing are not really there yet, although there are some interesting experiments. It’s also the case that digital and open book content is largely excluded from ways of measuring usage. The price of a lot of academic books is an issue as well. Are there ways that we can work together to try to bring cost down?  That’s not an easy problem to fix either, but it’s an ongoing challenge in terms of recommending books to students and inequalities of access to this material….”

Plan S advice for learned societies | Research Information

“Wellcome, in partnership with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Association of Learned & Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP), have engaged Information Power to explore a range of potential strategies and business models through which learned societies can transition to an open access landscape and adapt to Plan S. 

As the number of researchers covered by Plan S-compliant funding increases it will, in time, put pressure on the business models of many learned societies, which rely on hybrid journal publishing to cover their publishing costs, and to generate revenue for other important activities they undertake such as hosting meetings/conferences and awarding fellowships and other grants. 

Robert Kiley, head of open research at Wellcome said: ‘Wellcome and UKRI recognise the value learned societies play in supporting researchers and contributing to a vibrant research ecosystem. We are keen for them to be successful in transition to OA in line with Plan S.  We are delighted to partner with ALPSP to explore – via the team at Information Power – a diverse array of potential strategies and business models through which learned societies can adapt and thrive to this changing landscape.’

The team – including Alicia Wise, Lorraine Estelle, and Hazel Woodward at Information Power, plus additional expert Yvonne Campfens – will document and develop a range of transition approaches and business models for Learned Society publishers to consider.  These will be developed in dialogue with society publishers, libraries and consortia, funders, society members, and society publishing partners. …”

Springer Nature pledges support for Plan S | Research Information

Springer Nature is specifically calling on cOAlition S funders to:

  • Commit to undertake research to demonstrate the benefits of OA and the promotion of it to increase author and other funder take-up;
  • Commit to make transformative deals, such as Publish and Read deals, a key part of Plan S given their proven ability to drive growth in OA and within these deals and to remove its requirement for publishers to commit to ‘flip’ hybrid journals to OA in the near future;
  • Rethink more broadly its opposition to hybrid journals at a time when many academic disciplines and many geographic regions are not yet fully supportive of Gold OA;  
  • Remove the requirement to provide APC discounts for middle income countries such as China which is the largest publisher of academic research in the world and the second largest investor in R&D;
  • Recognise that highly selective journals and those with significant levels of non-primary research content need to be treated differently; and
  • Support platforms providing early access to primary research….”

Open-Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“That may soon change. Smaller-scale efforts are mixing with top-down decisions — through universities’ subscription negotiations and a major European plan that mandates open-access publication for certain research — to put unusual pressure on publishers.

Don’t think these battles are confined to the library or an individual discipline. The changes have the potential to alter nearly everything about how research is disseminated — and therefore how departments spend money, researchers collaborate, and faculty careers advance….”