From Open Access to Open Data: Collaborative Work in the University Libraries of Catalonia. Mireia Alcalá & Lluís Anglada (CSUC)

Presentation slides: “From Open Access to Open Data: Collaborative Work in the University Libraries of Catalonia. Mireia Alcalá & Lluís Anglada (CSUC)”.

COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) Annual Report 2016-17 (Public Version)

“COAR has been working to strengthen our role in terms of capacity building. We launched the COAR Webinar and Discussion Series to help raise awareness of our activities as well as important trends for repositories. We have also been actively seeking opportunities to develop more concrete training activities for repository managers, through leveraging relationships with partners and looking for external funding opportunities. It is expected that we will be able to launch some training events in 2017, with a special focus on developing regions. While sustainability and staffing continues to be a challenge for COAR, since the reduction of membership fees several years ago, we did gain several new members in 2016 and expect membership to continue to rise in 2017. We continue to benefit greatly from the voluntary participation of members and external experts in many of our activities, and these contributions are fundamental to COAR’s progress. On behalf of the Executive Board, and the COAR staff, I want to thank you for your participation in COAR and I look forward to continued engagement and collaboration in 2017-2018 year….”

Learning to be open: Open Access as a deliberate academic practice – Futures

“I believe open access is the way to do right by one’s research and maintain the integrity of the work, as much as we’re doing right by society at large through our research. We need to also empower early-career academics to know exactly what control they have over their own work, and what can be done with it, and in making a principled decision about access to their research. These decisions need to be considered at the beginning of the research process already and not just at the end. Just as with any new mode of practice, open access has a learning curve that requires deliberate and purposeful practice, but pays off very quickly in terms of citations, research impact, and social impact. So the next time you have a paper waiting to be written, look up the open access options in your discipline. In the meanwhile, make sure to find the preprint copies of all your published papers and deposit them in your institutional repository.”

Migrating to an Open Source Institutional Repository | fsu.digital.flvc.org

Abstract:  FSU Libraries recently completed a migration from Digital Commons (a hosted proprietary IR platform) to Islandora (an open source digital collections platform based on Drupal and Fedora Commons). In implementing a mission-critical open source system, we have encountered a variety of challenges related to technical development, shared governance, communications, and user testing. This presentation shares some of the lessons we learned so that others can benefit from our experience.

Survey tentang Repositori Institusi

From Google’s English: “This survey aims to see whether the academic community in ITB [Institut Teknologi Bandung] has understood the institutional repository (RI) and how RI can assist in disseminating research results. The survey is aimed specifically for the academic community of ITB: lecturers, researchers (academic assistants), undergraduate / S2 / S3 students, and general researchers….”

Elsevier acquires bepress, a leading service provider used by academic institutions to showcase their research

“Elsevier, the global information analytics business specializing in science and health, today acquired bepress, a Berkeley, California-based business that helps academic libraries showcase and share their institutions’ research for maximum impact. Founded by three University of California, Berkeley professors in 1999, bepress allows institutions to collect, organize, preserve and disseminate their intellectual output, including preprints, working papers, journals or specific articles, dissertations, theses, conference proceedings and a wide variety of other data.”

A Fantastic Milestone for Texas ScholarWorks! | Open Access at UT

TSW [Texas ScholarWorks] has now surpassed over 50,000 items! From theses and dissertations to newsletters to articles to student journals, we provide a wide-ranging collection of what is being produced by the UT Austin Community. We have been accessed millions of times by people in almost every country in the world! Thank you for your continued support.”

Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution

“This paper describes the process librarians in the Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University undertook to increase the amount of faculty publications in their institutional repository, known as the Digital Collections. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM Digital Collections at Texas State University is built on a DSpace platform and serves as the location for electronic theses and dissertations, faculty publications, and other digital Texas State University materials. Despite having launched the service in 2005, the amount of faculty work added to the repository has never been at the levels initially hoped for on launch.”

Exploiting Elsevier’s Creative Commons License Requirement to Subvert Embargo

“In the last round of author sharing policy revisions, Elsevier created a labyrinthine title-by-title embargo structure requiring embargoes from 12-48 months for author sharing via institutional repository (IR), while permitting immediate sharing via author’s personal website or blog. At the same time, all pre-publication versions are to bear a Creative Commons-Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND) license. At the time this policy was announced, it was rightly criticized by many in the scholarly communication community as overly complicated and unnecessary. However, this CC licensing requirement creates an avenue for subverting the embargo in the IR to achieve quicker open distribution of the author’s accepted manuscript. In short, authors may post an appropriately licensed copy on their personal site, at which point we may deposit without embargo in the IR, not through the license granted in the publication agreement, but through the CC license on the author’s version, which the sharing policy mandates. This poster will outline this issue, our experimentation with application, and engage viewers in questions regarding its potential risks, benefits, and workflows.”