v31#5 Optimizing Library Services — Institutional Repositories and Knowledge Curation: Revisiting Knowledge Conversion in the Academic Environment – Against the Grain

“Institutional repositories are vital to knowledge curation in the digital environment, and the discussion of knowledge conversion has presented a systematic view of the roles IRs have in creating and sharing knowledge through digital technology.  Knowledge conversion is a knowledge curation process allowing researchers, teaching faculty, administrators, staff, donors (of special collections and archival records), interviewees (in oral histories), cultural informants (in ethnography and folklore) to share data, information, and knowledge with a wider audience in a variety of ways known to academics and practitioners in the business community and various industries.  There is, however, a vast epistemological ground in the social sciences (e.g., anthropology, ethnography) and the humanities (e.g., philosophy, history) where knowledge creation does not rely on curation technologies (such as IRs). In fact, authors may decide to curate their own works in their institutional repositories well after publishing in a formal venue such as a journal, conference proceeding, or book chapter. The use of the IR represents interests related to historical reflection and preservation, which is where finalized reports and data are available for viewing and further study.  Knowledge curation through the IR further supports collaboration across organizational units that have relied for very long on data silos and departmental databases.”

From Meow to ROAR: Expanding Open Access Repository Services at the University of Houston Libraries

Abstract. INTRODUCTION The rapidly changing scholarly communication ecosystem is placing a growing premium on research data and scholarship that is openly available. It also places a growing pressure on universities and research organizations to expand their publishing infrastructures and related services. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM To embrace the change and meet local demands, University of Houston (UH) Libraries formed a cross-departmental open access implementation team in 2017 to expand our open access repository services to accommodate a broad range of research products beyond electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The result of this effort was the Cougar Research Open Access Repositories (Cougar ROAR), a rebranded and expanded portal to the UH Institutional Repository, and the UH Dataverse, which disseminates the full range of scholarly outputs generated at the University of Houston. This article describes the team’s phased activities, including internal preparation, a campus pilot, rebranding, and a robust outreach program. It also details the team’s specific tasks, such as building the Cougar ROAR portal, developing ROAR policies and guidelines, enhancing institutional repository functionality, conducting campus promotional activities, and piloting and scaling a campus-wide open access program. NEXT STEPS Based on the pilot project findings and the resulting recommendations, the team outlined key next steps for sustainability of the UH Libraries’ open access services: continuation of the campus CV service, establishment of campus-wide OA policy, further promotion of Cougar ROAR and assessment of OA programs and services, and investment in long-term storage and preservation of scholarly output in Cougar ROAR.

v31#5 The Once and Future IR Agenda: Resolving the Dialectic Aims of Institutional Repositories – Against the Grain

“In our 2016 work, Making Institutional Repositories Work, Callicott, Scherer, and I drew a distinction between institutional repositories and institutional repository initiatives.  The former referred to the technical infrastructure of the repository itself, while the latter referred to the holistic suite of infrastructure and services “intended to support the preservation and organization of, and access to, the intellectual output of the institution in which they [institutional repositories themselves] were housed” (XV).  In the forward to the book and in subsequent publications, Clifford Lynch and subsequently Scott Plutchak identify the yet unresolved dialectical aims of institutional repositories.  By which, they refer to the tension between repositories as vehicles for Green OA, and repositories as platforms to augment the scholarly record by hosting non-traditional research outputs.  Both Lynch and Plutchak challenge the former in support of the latter.  Our book consisted of case studies and practitioner observations and, as such, largely discussed the ways in which IRs have enabled green OA.

This practitioner thinks that IR support for the green OA movement has been impactful, and while I am inclined to agree that the future of IRs is best represented by hosting and preserving new forms of scholarship, I do think they can and should continue to support green OA.  To that end, I would like to encourage us to think of the dialectical aims of institutional repositories in a Hegelian sense, which is to say not as thesis and antithesis in static opposition to one another, but as an interplay of movement between the two which reveals them to be interdependent parts of a whole.  In this way, we can continue with a conceptualization of institutional repositories as locally-based networked suites of both services and infrastructure, rather than singularly-focused platforms aimed at promoting either Green OA or augmenting the scholarly record. Thinking of repositories in this way encourages further diversification of the scholarly communication ecosystem in terms of both types of scholarly outputs, and versions of traditional outputs….”

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

CARL Releases Report on Institutional Repository Statistics Tracking – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the first report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this first report focuses on approaches to institutional repository (IR) statistics tracking.

Institutional Repository Statistics: Reliable, Consistent Approaches for Canada was written by Will Roy (Queen’s University), Brian Cameron (Ryerson University), and Tim Ribaric (Brock University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group for Standards for IR Usage Data.

This task group undertook an information-gathering exercise to better understand both the existing practices of Canadian repositories and the emerging tools and processes available for repositories to track and monitor usage more effectively. This report also presents recommendations on how to collectively achieve reliable and comparable statistics across all Canadian repositories….”

CARL Releases Report on Institutional Repository Statistics Tracking – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the first report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this first report focuses on approaches to institutional repository (IR) statistics tracking.

Institutional Repository Statistics: Reliable, Consistent Approaches for Canada was written by Will Roy (Queen’s University), Brian Cameron (Ryerson University), and Tim Ribaric (Brock University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group for Standards for IR Usage Data.

This task group undertook an information-gathering exercise to better understand both the existing practices of Canadian repositories and the emerging tools and processes available for repositories to track and monitor usage more effectively. This report also presents recommendations on how to collectively achieve reliable and comparable statistics across all Canadian repositories….”

Knowledge for all: A decade of open access at uOttawa | Gazette | University of Ottawa

“This month marks the 10th anniversary of uOttawa’s OA program—the first of its kind in Canada. By helping to make research freely available online, the University has positioned itself as a global leader in the transformation of scholarly communication….”

Knowledge for all: A decade of open access at uOttawa | Gazette | University of Ottawa

“This month marks the 10th anniversary of uOttawa’s OA program—the first of its kind in Canada. By helping to make research freely available online, the University has positioned itself as a global leader in the transformation of scholarly communication….”

NIRDs Unite: Building a Community of Institutional Repository Practitioners in the Northeast

“In the northeastern United States, there is a noticeable lack of any organized regional events specifically related to the topic of IRs. With other regions across the country holding similar events — along with recent national discussions and projects proposing a move away from local repositories (Coalition of Networked Information [CNI], 2017; Weinraub, Alagna, Caizzi, Quinn, & Schaefer, 2018) — starting a regional community of practice could prove beneficial in the long-term for repository managers and their institutions. Repository managers have a vested interest in the ongoing success of the repositories they manage; have genuine policy, copyright, and self-archiving concerns; and have developed robust workflows to manage their IRs’ unique content and needs. At the end of the day, how do we communicate the value of the work we do to external stakeholders, our broader institution, and library administration? The idea for “Northeast Institutional Repository Day” (NIRD) was conceived by a group of five repository librarians in the northeast. The organizers sent out a pre-conference online survey to the IR community in November 2018 to see if fellow repository practitioners had an interest in attending and/or participating in such a day and the response was a resounding, “Yes!” The survey results suggested that building a stronger regional network of repository managers would foster meaningful discussions on the merits and effectiveness of IRs….”