LSU Libraries hosts open access e-textbook for Spanish 2155 | LSU Libraries News & Notes

“This past fall, students in Dr. Carmela Mattza’s Spanish 2155 course were able to access their course textbook free of cost from LSU Digital Commons. Mattza, an associate professor of Spanish, published her e-textbook Variedades: Intermediate/Advanced Spanish Conversation in the University’s institutional repository, which is hosted by LSU Libraries. Articles and books in LSU Digital Commons are open access, which means they are available to everyone at no cost….”

Enhancing Academic Visibility of Faculty Members in Nigerian University Community: The Role of Institutional Repositories

Abstract: This paper focused on the role of institutional repositories in enhancing the academic visibility of faculty members in Nigerian university community. It began with a brief clarification of the concept of Institutional Repository (IR) before delving into its origin, spread, contents and mode of population of contents. This smoothened the ground for a detailed analysis of the role which IRs can play as enablers of information provision in Nigerian universities. Subsequently, attention was drawn to the potentials of IRs as avenues through which tertiary institutions of learning can increase access to, and visibility of, the academic outputs of their scholars and researchers. Notwithstanding the challenges to the optimal performance of the few repositories available in Nigerian universities, the paper posits that the prospects and fortunes of these IRs would change for the better with sustained efforts and commitment of various stakeholders. It is on the basis of this conclusion that several recommendations were made, including sustained awareness and advocacy, adequate funding of universities in Nigeria and their libraries, provision of better training opportunities for librarians to improve their IT competency, as well as increase in the rate of population of content deposition. 

Enhancing Academic Visibility of Faculty Members in Nigerian University Community: The Role of Institutional Repositories

Abstract: This paper focused on the role of institutional repositories in enhancing the academic visibility of faculty members in Nigerian university community. It began with a brief clarification of the concept of Institutional Repository (IR) before delving into its origin, spread, contents and mode of population of contents. This smoothened the ground for a detailed analysis of the role which IRs can play as enablers of information provision in Nigerian universities. Subsequently, attention was drawn to the potentials of IRs as avenues through which tertiary institutions of learning can increase access to, and visibility of, the academic outputs of their scholars and researchers. Notwithstanding the challenges to the optimal performance of the few repositories available in Nigerian universities, the paper posits that the prospects and fortunes of these IRs would change for the better with sustained efforts and commitment of various stakeholders. It is on the basis of this conclusion that several recommendations were made, including sustained awareness and advocacy, adequate funding of universities in Nigeria and their libraries, provision of better training opportunities for librarians to improve their IT competency, as well as increase in the rate of population of content deposition. 

Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  While institutional repositories have long focused on ensuring the availability of research, recent university initiatives have begun to focus on other aspects of open access, such as digital accessibility. Indiana University’s institutional repository (IR), IUScholarWorks, audited the accessibility of its existing content and created policies to encourage accessible submissions. No established workflows considering accessibility existed when this audit took place, and no additional resources were allocated to facilitate this shift in focus. As a result, the Scholarly Communication team altered the repository submission workflow to encourage authors to make their finished documents accessible with limited intervention. This paper shares an overview of the accessibility audit that took place, the changes made to our submission process, and finally provides tips and resources for universities who aim to integrate accessibility more thoroughly into their IR practices.

 

Full article: An Institutional Repository Publishing Model for Imperial College London Grey Literature

Abstract:  In 2019 we became increasingly aware of authors at Imperial College London choosing to publish grey literature through local website PDF or full text hosting. Recognising the need to improve the institutional open access repository as a venue of choice to publish or co-publish grey literature, we developed a publishing model of identifiers (DOIs and ORCIDs) and metrics (indexing, citations and Altmetric coverage). Some of the incentives already existed in the repository but had not previously been explicitly communicated as benefits; whilst others required technical infrastructure development and scholarly communications education for authors. As of September 2020, a 206% increase in deposit of one type of grey literature has been observed on the previous full year, including Imperial’s influential COVID-19 reports.

 

The ‘Impact Opportunity’ for Academic Libraries through Grey Literature

Abstract:  This paper proposes a new role for academic libraries as part of a wider ‘research practice’ activity for research institutions, incorporating support, training and expertise in relation to scholarly communication and research impact. The role libraries hold within research institutions is changing as the world shifts towards a digital and increasingly open future. This requires a rethink of the types of services and skill sets that are appropriate for an academic library to encompass. The increased focus of institutions and funders on the societal impact of research offers an opportunity for academic libraries to further integrate their work into the open research agenda. Libraries can draw on what is now over a decade of experience introducing open access, institutional repositories and research data management service to their academic communities to inform the development of impact services.

An immediate service that libraries can offer is assisting with the identification of, and sometimes deposit into the institutional repository of, works that are sitting outside the peer reviewed literature – grey literature. This material needs to be collected for the purposes of demonstrating outcomes and pathways to impact. This paper describes the need to consider item classifications within digital repositories. If this new service is considered an option into the future, libraries themselves and potentially research offices will need to look not just at workflows but also item classifications within systems to ensure they encompass this broader collection of works.

 

An analysis of use and performance data aggregated from 35 institutional repositories | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

This study demonstrates that aggregated data from the Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) have significant potential to analyze visibility and use of institutional repositories (IR) as well as potential factors affecting their use, including repository size, platform, content, device and global location. The RAMP dataset is unique and public.

Design/methodology/approach

The webometrics methodology was followed to aggregate and analyze use and performance data from 35 institutional repositories in seven countries that were registered with the RAMP for a five-month period in 2019. The RAMP aggregates Google Search Console (GSC) data to show IR items that surfaced in search results from all Google properties.

Findings

The analyses demonstrate large performance variances across IR as well as low overall use. The findings also show that device use affects search behavior, that different content types such as electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) may affect use and that searches originating in the Global South show much higher use of mobile devices than in the Global North.

Research limitations/implications

The RAMP relies on GSC as its sole data source, resulting in somewhat conservative overall numbers. However, the data are also expected to be as robot free as can be hoped.

Originality/value

This may be the first analysis of aggregate use and performance data derived from a global set of IR, using an openly published dataset. RAMP data offer significant research potential with regard to quantifying and characterizing variances in the discoverability and use of IR content.

New Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal takes collaborative approach to Open Access – About UBC Library

“Community members living in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) have been the focal point of countless scholarly research studies and surveys over the years. Up until recently, this research has remained largely out of reach to participants and community organizations, locked away in journals and other databases that require paid subscriptions to access. Community members have said they would benefit from access to that data for evaluating program and service effectiveness, for example, or for grant writing….

The recently launched Downtown Eastside Research Access Portal (DTES RAP), a project led by the UBC Learning Exchange in partnership with UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, is designed to change that.

The DTES RAP provides access to research and research-related materials relevant to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside through an easy-to-use public interface. The portal was developed in consultation with DTES residents and community organizations through focus groups and user experience testing, and in collaboration with a number of university units.  …”

Digital curation practices in institutional repositories in South India: a study | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the digital curation practices in institutional repositories (IRs) in South India. Design/methodology/approach A voluntary survey was conducted among the IR managers of 23 South Indian IRs, and the response rate was 87%. Findings This study found that the active participation of South Indian IRs was only seen in a few digital curation activities. However, of the 33 digital curation activities analyzed, the active participation of repositories was only seen in ten digital curation activities. The performance of preservation activities was extremely low, and disagreements were recorded by the survey participants toward several digital curation activities. The most disagreed digital curation activities were emulation and cease data curation. All the participants had assigned metadata and allowed file downloads in their repositories. Raman Research Institute had provided a good number of digital curation services in their IR. Originality/value This is an in-depth study investigating the digital curation practice currently underway in South Indian IRs, and the researcher could not find similar studies in this niche.