COAR Next Generation Repositories: Vision and Objectives

“Vision

To position repositories as the foundation for a distributed, globally networked infrastructure for scholarly communication, on top of which layers of value added services will be deployed, thereby transforming the system, making it more research-centric, open to and supportive of innovation, while also collectively managed by the scholarly community.

Technical Vision

Our vision rests on making the resource, rather than the repository, the focus of services and infrastructure. Rather than relying on imprecise descriptive metadata to identify entities and the relationships between them, our vision relies on the idea inherent in the Web Architecture, where entities (known as “resources”) are accessible and identified unambiguously by URLs. In this architecture, it is the references which are copied between systems, rather than (as at present) the metadata records. Furthermore we encourage repository developers to automatize the metadata extraction from the actual resources as much as possible to simplify and lower the barrier to the deposit process.

Objectives

  • To achieve a level of cross-repository interoperability by exposing uniform behaviours across repositories that leverage web-friendly technologies and architectures, and by integrating with existing global scholarly infrastructures specifically those aimed at identification of e.g. contributions, research data, contributors, institutions, funders, projects.
  • To encourage the emergence of value added services that use these uniform behaviours to support discovery, access, annotation, real-time curation, sharing, quality assessment, content transfer, analytics, provenance tracing, etc.
  • To help transform the scholarly communication system by emphasizing the benefits of collective, open and distributed management, open content, uniform behaviours, real-time dissemination, and collective innovation. “

Digitising archives, sharing knowledge | Interview | Nepali Times

“The South Asia Materials Project is now digitising as the means of preservation, and many of the resources are being made available online. Further, the newly formed South Asia Open Archives initiative is laying plans for massive efforts to digitise and make available important cultural resources for open access.”

Archives in space: Humanity’s cold storage Big Data backup | CIO Dive

“For the near-term, increasing data storage in space is “necessary and useful” in light of the modern space race, the evolution of the internet into space and the ability to work with Big Data and higher bandwidths of data in space.

So as a moon colony and regular trips to Mars become a reality, increased data storage will prove critical. 

But there is a more important reason the Arch Mission is working to establish a Big Data record in space: “This is a backup and recovery project for our civilization and it’s solar system scale,” said Spivack….

While the first launch with SpaceX was largely symbolic, the Arch Mission is working with various groups to send large amounts of open data into space, from the Wikipedia archives to Archive.org. Placing open data sets in different locations in space will create redundancy and ensure humanity’s records will not be lost….”

The Keepers Registry

“Supporting long-term access to journal content….Discover who is looking after your e-journals….[In addition to searching for journal titles, you can browse a list of journal-preservation organizations.] The following organisations are the Keepers of digital content, working on your behalf to ensure long-term access to the scholarly and cultural record. They provide the registry with information on their archival holdings, ordered by most recent update (date of which is shown)….”

Practical guide to building future proof Open Data Portals – European Data Portal

“The EU Member States are making visible progress with regard to their Open Data transformation journey, with many Open Data initiatives as well as portals being launched each year. However in order to ensure such data infrastructures remain relevant over time, a series of aspects should be considered and embedded in the design stages of any Open Data portal.”

Preserving Harvard’s Early Data and Research in Astronomy

“Material originally produced during the mid-to-late 19th century and early 20th century by researchers at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) was recently re-discovered in the HCO Astronomical Plate Stacks collection. This material helps represent the history of the HCO and acts as an irreplaceable primary source on the evolution of observation methods and astronomy as a science. The material is also relevant to the history of women in science as the collection contains log books and notebooks produced by the Harvard Computers, women who have come back into the spotlight due to the recent release of a book by author Dava Sobel titled “The Glass Universe”.  Wolbach Library anticipates that this material, once preserved and made searchable, will enable research into early astronomy for future generations….”

Digits receives $60,000 grant to help scholars publish work – The Tartan

“The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pittsburgh an 18-month-long $60,000 grant to support a project known as “Digits.” …The aim of Digits is to optimize the software containers used in publishing scholarly research in order to make it easier and cheaper for scholars to publish their work and maintain it….“Hosting costs, maintenance, peer review, and preservation for non-traditional publications almost always fall upon the original authors; the equivalent duties for print scholarship, instead, are taken up by publishers, libraries, or scholarly organizations,” said the leaders of the project in a co-interview over email with The Tartan….The current digital publication system can lead to issues such as link rot, which happens when scholars change web hosts or let subscriptions expire, making the publications no longer available. “The responsibility of digital preservation needs to be shifted from individual researchers to journal publishers or university archives,” said Lavin in a university press release. Another feature of the project will allow scholars to update their work more easily. “It is often considered double-dipping or even cheating to publish nearly identical research as more data becomes available,” Weingart said in the press release. Thus, the leaders plan to incorporate an update feature into the software infrastructure they develop….”

CMU, Pitt Receive Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant To Plan Platform for Digital Scholarship

“The Andrew. W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh an 18-month, $60,000 grant to research the development of a standardized platform for digital scholarship. The award will support “Digits,” a project that will explore how new technologies that make it increasingly easy to publish, share, reproduce and archive complex digital materials can be sustained in a unified and flexible way….Researchers currently invest countless time and resources creating interactive pieces and self-publishing them online. “But scholars might change web hosts or let subscriptions expire,” Lavin said. “This leads to something called link rot. The responsibility of digital preservation needs to be shifted from individual researchers to journal publishers or university archives.” Digits also will allow digital projects and small-scale work to be preserved and updated. “It is often considered double-dipping or even cheating to publish nearly identical research as more data becomes available,” Weingart said. “Digits would provide infrastructure for regularly updating publications, as with an article that relays perpetually current popular opinions about romance fiction based on a large-scale analysis of online reviews.” …”

#NEWPALMYRA

“Collecting data from international partners, analyzing it, creating a reconstruction of Palmyra in virtual space, and sharing the models and data in the public domain. We are using digital tools to preserve heritage sites.

Cultural Development

Hosting live workshops and building a network of artists, technologists, archaeologists, architects, and others to research, construct models, and create artistic works. We create exhibitions and experiences in museums and institutions globally, celebrating the cultural heritage of Syria and the world through the lens of architecture embodying culture and power.

Open Data

Helping to advance open data policies in museums and institutions through advocacy, education, and consultation.

Together with our international affiliates, #NEWPALMYRA sources archaeological and historical data, shares it with the community, and outputs art exhibitions, salons, and creative works using this data to carry the rich history of Palmyra forward to new generations….”