Coherent Digital Announces Policy Commons to Launch in June 2020

“Toby Green, former Head of Publishing, OECD and now co-founder, Coherent Digital: “It took 60 years for scientific consensus on the dangers of asbestos to change public health policy. It’s been 120 years since researchers gave early warning about the climate, yet policy makers are only just beginning to take action. One of the reasons for the long delay between expert consensus and policy action is because most content from experts in IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers is published informally. This makes discovery hard, cataloguing impossible and preservation a nightmare. Students struggle to learn, too. In reading lists and syllabi, we’ve found that 25% of links to documents are broken. We intend to fix these problems with Policy Commons.”

Policy Commons will be an open platform that makes it easy to find, catalog and preserve reports, working papers, policy briefs and data from a directory of over 5,000 IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers. It will be a comprehensive service that covers born-digital and archival material from IGOs like the OECD, the UN, the World Bank, IMF, FAO and EU, as well as leading NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and smaller influential think tanks.

Anyone will be able to use Policy Commons to find the content they need – full text access will be offered via the original website, if still available. Subscribing institutions will be able to access preservation copies, exclusive content, and benefit from a full range of support services, including catalog data and usage tracking….”

Coherent Digital Announces Policy Commons to Launch in June 2020

“Toby Green, former Head of Publishing, OECD and now co-founder, Coherent Digital: “It took 60 years for scientific consensus on the dangers of asbestos to change public health policy. It’s been 120 years since researchers gave early warning about the climate, yet policy makers are only just beginning to take action. One of the reasons for the long delay between expert consensus and policy action is because most content from experts in IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers is published informally. This makes discovery hard, cataloguing impossible and preservation a nightmare. Students struggle to learn, too. In reading lists and syllabi, we’ve found that 25% of links to documents are broken. We intend to fix these problems with Policy Commons.”

Policy Commons will be an open platform that makes it easy to find, catalog and preserve reports, working papers, policy briefs and data from a directory of over 5,000 IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers. It will be a comprehensive service that covers born-digital and archival material from IGOs like the OECD, the UN, the World Bank, IMF, FAO and EU, as well as leading NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and smaller influential think tanks.

Anyone will be able to use Policy Commons to find the content they need – full text access will be offered via the original website, if still available. Subscribing institutions will be able to access preservation copies, exclusive content, and benefit from a full range of support services, including catalog data and usage tracking….”

v31#5 Optimizing Library Services — Institutional Repositories and Knowledge Curation: Revisiting Knowledge Conversion in the Academic Environment – Against the Grain

“Institutional repositories are vital to knowledge curation in the digital environment, and the discussion of knowledge conversion has presented a systematic view of the roles IRs have in creating and sharing knowledge through digital technology.  Knowledge conversion is a knowledge curation process allowing researchers, teaching faculty, administrators, staff, donors (of special collections and archival records), interviewees (in oral histories), cultural informants (in ethnography and folklore) to share data, information, and knowledge with a wider audience in a variety of ways known to academics and practitioners in the business community and various industries.  There is, however, a vast epistemological ground in the social sciences (e.g., anthropology, ethnography) and the humanities (e.g., philosophy, history) where knowledge creation does not rely on curation technologies (such as IRs). In fact, authors may decide to curate their own works in their institutional repositories well after publishing in a formal venue such as a journal, conference proceeding, or book chapter. The use of the IR represents interests related to historical reflection and preservation, which is where finalized reports and data are available for viewing and further study.  Knowledge curation through the IR further supports collaboration across organizational units that have relied for very long on data silos and departmental databases.”

From Meow to ROAR: Expanding Open Access Repository Services at the University of Houston Libraries

Abstract. INTRODUCTION The rapidly changing scholarly communication ecosystem is placing a growing premium on research data and scholarship that is openly available. It also places a growing pressure on universities and research organizations to expand their publishing infrastructures and related services. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM To embrace the change and meet local demands, University of Houston (UH) Libraries formed a cross-departmental open access implementation team in 2017 to expand our open access repository services to accommodate a broad range of research products beyond electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The result of this effort was the Cougar Research Open Access Repositories (Cougar ROAR), a rebranded and expanded portal to the UH Institutional Repository, and the UH Dataverse, which disseminates the full range of scholarly outputs generated at the University of Houston. This article describes the team’s phased activities, including internal preparation, a campus pilot, rebranding, and a robust outreach program. It also details the team’s specific tasks, such as building the Cougar ROAR portal, developing ROAR policies and guidelines, enhancing institutional repository functionality, conducting campus promotional activities, and piloting and scaling a campus-wide open access program. NEXT STEPS Based on the pilot project findings and the resulting recommendations, the team outlined key next steps for sustainability of the UH Libraries’ open access services: continuation of the campus CV service, establishment of campus-wide OA policy, further promotion of Cougar ROAR and assessment of OA programs and services, and investment in long-term storage and preservation of scholarly output in Cougar ROAR.

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

CARL Releases Report on Preservation Functionality in Repositories – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) is pleased to announce the publication of the second report in a series by its Open Repositories Working Group (ORWG) – this report focuses on preservation functionality in repositories.

Digital Preservation Functionality in Canadian Repositories was written by Tomasz Neugebauer (Concordia University), Pierre Lasou (Université Laval), Andrea Kosavic (York University), and Tim Walsh (Concordia University), on behalf of the CARL ORWG’s Task Group on Next Generation Repositories.

Inspired by the inclusion of digital preservation functionality as one of the recommendations in the Behaviours and Technical Recommendations of the COAR Next Generation Repositories Working Group (2017), this task group set out to make progress on the building of a common understanding of basic digital preservation requirements and functionality necessary to achieve this vision of a sustainable digital preservation network (a suggestion within the Portage Network’s 2018 white paper Research Data Preservation in Canada). This report focuses on technical functional requirements, and as such, it is intended for scholarly communication librarians and repository administrators assessing or looking to enhance the digital preservation support in their repositories. …”

Archivists Are Trying to Make Sure a ‘Pirate Bay of Science’ Never Goes Down – VICE

“It’s hard to find free and open access to scientific material online. The latest studies and current research huddle behind paywalls unread by those who could benefit. But over the last few years, two sites—Library Genesis and Sci-Hub—have become high-profile, widely used resources for pirating scientific papers.

The problem is that these sites have had a lot of difficulty actually staying online. They have faced both legal challenges and logistical hosting problems that has knocked them offline for long periods of time. But a new project by data hoarders and freedom of information activists hopes to bring some stability to one of the two “Pirate Bays of Science.” …”

 

OKFN Open Science Mailing List will close on 31 Jan 2020 – where to next?

“Open Knowledge Foundation will be closing down their mailman lists by January 31st, 2020….Instead they will focus on offering a Discourse forum (https://discuss.okfn.org) which already has an open science category: https://discuss.okfn.org/c/working-groups/open-science

There are two things for members of this list to think about: 1 – where are the important conversations on open science happening now? What new lists should we join as this one closes and are there gaps that need to be filled? 2 – where to preserve the list archives? Open Knowledge Foundation do not plan to do so publicly and there is value (I think) in preserving conversations dating back 12 years to a time when open science was at a completely different level of development. If anyone has ideas or could help with archiving that would be great – I have asked for a copy to be kept but I don’t know in what form it will arrive!

As a very early member of this list I think it played an important role in developing an open science community that has spun into many active and exciting communities around the world. Moving on is not a bad thing and there are so many more communication channels to connect on open science topics than back in 2008 – I’d love to hear your recommendations! …

The decision has come about for three reasons:

 1. Managing the mailing lists and keeping the infrastructure up to date represents an effort in terms of resources and administration time that Open Knowledge Foundation is unable to meet going forward.

2. GDPR: EU legislation now requires us to have an active and current knowledge of the data held on our websites, as well as the consent of the subscribers regarding the use of their personal data, to ensure GDPR compliance. Unfortunately, Mailman mailing lists don’t comply with this Directive, which means we can’t use this tool any more.

3. We are currently implementing a new strategy within Open Knowledge Foundation which will focus the organisation on several key themes, namely Education, Health and Work. We want to keep fostering conversations but let groups choose what the best platform is for that.”

For the Love of Literacy–Better World Books and the Internet Archive Unite to Preserve Millions of Books | Internet Archive Blogs

“Announced today, Better World Books, the world’s leading socially conscious online bookseller, is now owned by Better World Libraries, a mission-aligned, not-for-profit organization that is affiliated with longtime partner, the Internet Archive.  This groundbreaking partnership will allow both organizations to pursue their collective mission of making knowledge universally accessible to readers everywhere. This new relationship will provide additional resources and newfound synergies backed by a shared enthusiasm for advancing global literacy. Together, the two organizations are expanding the digital frontier of book preservation to ensure books are accessible to all for generations to come.

This new relationship will allow Better World Books to provide a steady stream of books to be digitized by the Internet Archive, thereby growing its digital holdings to millions of books. Libraries that work alongside Better World Books will now make a bigger impact than ever. Any book that does not yet exist in digital form will go into a pipeline for future digitization, preservation and access.  …”

South Asia Open Archives (SAOA) on JSTOR

“The South Asia Open Archives (SAOA), a subset of the South Asia Materials Project (SAMP), creates and maintains a collection of open access materials for the study of South Asia. This major collaborative initiative is aimed at addressing the current scarcity of digital resources pertinent to South Asia studies and at making collections more widely accessible both to North American scholars and to researchers worldwide….”