ArSciHub — A Sci-Hub Mirror on Arweave – 12Bits – Medium

“Everytime a scholar retrieves a research paper from Sci-Hub, or from elsewhere, they can elect to archive the paper on ArSciHub. A paper archived on ArSciHub is stored permanently on Arweave’s decentralised blockweave, and added to the ArSciHub index for future access by the archiver and the general public.”

Preserving endangered wonders of the world, for generations to come

“When Ben Kacyra watched on TV as the Taliban destroyed 1,500 year-old Buddhist statues in Bamiyan, Afghanistan in 2001, he felt compelled to do something. Mr. Kacyra, who happens to be one of the creators of the world’s first three-dimensional laser scanning system, realized that his technology could be used to record monuments at risk of damage due to natural disasters, war, or tourism, so that they could be preserved for future generations.

He founded CyArk, a non-profit that has created the world’s largest and most detailed 3D digital archive of endangered wonders of the world—a lasting record of monuments at risk of disappearing. Now, Google Arts & Culture has partnered with CyArk to open up access to their virtual wonders and share their stories with everyone. …”

Pathfinders: Documenting the Experience of Early Digital Literature

“Pathfinders begins the necessary process of documenting early digital literature, specifically pre-web hypertext fiction and poetry, from 1986-1995. These literary works were produced with programming languages like BASIC or authoring systems like Storyspace and HyperCard and require a degree of interactivity between the reader and the work. They were also among the first computer-based works of literature to be sold commercially in the U.S. and, because of their availability through commercial distribution, were influential in shaping literary theory and criticism that, today, are used to discuss born digital writing. They are also literary works in danger of becoming inaccessible to the public because they were produced on and for computer platforms that today are obsolete….”

What Happens When Science Just Disappears? | WIRED

“KAY DICKERSIN KNEW she was leaping to the front lines of scholarly publication when she joined The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials. Scientific print-publishing was—and still is—slow and cumbersome, and reading its results sometimes required researchers to go to the library. But as associate editor at this electronic peer-reviewed journal—one of the very first, launched in the summer of 1992—Dickersin was poised to help bring scientists into the new digital age. Dickersin, an epidemiologist, acted as an associate editor, helping researchers publish their work. But the OJCCT was a bit ahead of its time. The journal was sold in 1994 to a publisher that eventually became part of Taylor & Francis, and which stopped the e-presses just a couple years later. And after that happened, its papers—reports, reviews, and meta-analysis of clinical trials—all disappeared. Dickersin wasn’t just sad to lose her editing gig: She was dismayed that the scientific community was losing those archives. “One of my important studies was in there,” she says, “and no one could get it.” Couldn’t, that is, until Dickersin decided to go spelunking for science. For more than a decade, Dickersin’s paper was missing along with about 80 others. Sometimes, the ex-editors would try to find out who had the rights to the articles, whether they could just take copies and put them on their own website. “We don’t want to do that,” they’d always conclude. “We don’t want to get in trouble.” Finally, Dickersin went to the librarians at Johns Hopkins University, where she is a professor, for help—and that’s how she found Portico. Portico is like a Wayback Machine for scholarly publications. The digital preservation service ingests, meta-tags, preserves, manages, and updates content for publishers and libraries, and then provides access to those archives. The company soon signed on to the project and got permission from Taylor & Francis to make the future archives open-access….”

Call for tenders: Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

“Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

The present call for tender concerns the setting up of a publishing platform for scientific articles as a service for Horizon 2020 beneficiaries. The Platform will provide an open access publishing venue without cost to the beneficiaries of Horizon 2020. The platform will manage the entire publication process, from submission to publication, post-publication curation and preservation, of original articles stemming from Horizon 2020 funding and will implement an open peer-review system. It will also host pre-prints. Published articles and hosted pre-prints will be openly available to all researchers and citizens. Tenderers are called to customize an existing publishing infrastructure solution to the requirements of the European Commission, to develop processes and policies to run the platform as a service, to engage in communication activities for the Platform and to run the service and publish articles in the Platform. The tender is for a Framework Contract with a duration of 4 years….”

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Data Management for Biomedical Big Data

The Countway Library of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School has received funding from the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative for Research Education, to develop a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Data Management for Biomedical Big Data. This MOOC is is built upon and expands the training materials of the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC), developed by several libraries in the New England region. 

The Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management course is hosted by the Canvas Network and provides training to librarians, biomedical researchers, undergraduate and graduate biomedical students, and other individuals interested on best practices for discoverability, access, integrity, reuse value, privacy, security, and long term preservation of biomedical research data. The course is free and self-paced….”

Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management – Canvas Network | Free online courses | MOOCs

“Biomedical research today is not only rigorous, innovative and insightful, it also has to be organized and reproducible. With more capacity to create and store data, there is the challenge of making data discoverable, understandable, and reusable. Many funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring publication of relevant data to promote open science and reproducibility of research.

In order to meet to these requirements and evolving trends, researchers and information professionals will need the data management and curation knowledge and skills to support the access, reuse and preservation of data.

This course is designed to address present and future data management needs….”

COAR Next Generation Repositories: Vision and Objectives

“Vision

To position repositories as the foundation for a distributed, globally networked infrastructure for scholarly communication, on top of which layers of value added services will be deployed, thereby transforming the system, making it more research-centric, open to and supportive of innovation, while also collectively managed by the scholarly community.

Technical Vision

Our vision rests on making the resource, rather than the repository, the focus of services and infrastructure. Rather than relying on imprecise descriptive metadata to identify entities and the relationships between them, our vision relies on the idea inherent in the Web Architecture, where entities (known as “resources”) are accessible and identified unambiguously by URLs. In this architecture, it is the references which are copied between systems, rather than (as at present) the metadata records. Furthermore we encourage repository developers to automatize the metadata extraction from the actual resources as much as possible to simplify and lower the barrier to the deposit process.

Objectives

  • To achieve a level of cross-repository interoperability by exposing uniform behaviours across repositories that leverage web-friendly technologies and architectures, and by integrating with existing global scholarly infrastructures specifically those aimed at identification of e.g. contributions, research data, contributors, institutions, funders, projects.
  • To encourage the emergence of value added services that use these uniform behaviours to support discovery, access, annotation, real-time curation, sharing, quality assessment, content transfer, analytics, provenance tracing, etc.
  • To help transform the scholarly communication system by emphasizing the benefits of collective, open and distributed management, open content, uniform behaviours, real-time dissemination, and collective innovation. “

Digitising archives, sharing knowledge | Interview | Nepali Times

“The South Asia Materials Project is now digitising as the means of preservation, and many of the resources are being made available online. Further, the newly formed South Asia Open Archives initiative is laying plans for massive efforts to digitise and make available important cultural resources for open access.”