The IJOEM , DOAJ Seal, and Plan S | Habibzadeh | Int J Occup Environ Med (The IJOEM)

“Many OA journals are published in the world, but for the time being, only a few have implemented Plan S.8 I am pleased to inform you that The IJOEM, a platinum OA journal, is the only medical journal in the rejoin that has implemented Plan S. This implementation is, indeed, in line with our primary mission to provide free access to quality scientific materials for all people throughout the world….”

The IJOEM , DOAJ Seal, and Plan S | Habibzadeh | Int J Occup Environ Med (The IJOEM)

“Many OA journals are published in the world, but for the time being, only a few have implemented Plan S.8 I am pleased to inform you that The IJOEM, a platinum OA journal, is the only medical journal in the rejoin that has implemented Plan S. This implementation is, indeed, in line with our primary mission to provide free access to quality scientific materials for all people throughout the world….”

Guest post: a technical update from our development team – News Service

“Here are some major bits of work that we have carried out:

Enhancements to our historical data management system. We track all changes to the body of publicly available objects (Journals and Articles) and we have a better process for handling that.
Introduced a more advanced testing framework for the source code. As DOAJ gains more features, the code becomes larger and more complex. To ensure that it is properly tested for before going into production, we have started to use parameterised testing on the core components. This allows us to carry out broader and deeper testing to ensure the system is defect free.
A weekly data dump of the entire public dataset (Journals and Articles) which is freely downloadable.
A major data cleanup on articles: a few tens of thousands of duplicates, from historical data or sneaking in through validation loopholes, were identified and removed. We closed the loopholes and cleaned up the data.
A complete new hardware infrastructure, using Cloudflare. This resulted in the significant increase in stability mentioned above and allows us to cope with our growing data set (increasing at a rate of around 750,000 records per year at this point).

And here are some projects we have been working on which you will see come into effect over the next few weeks:

A completely new search front-end. It looks very similar to the old one, but with some major improvements under-the-hood (more powerful, more responsive, more accessible), and gives us the capability to build better, cooler interfaces in the future.
Support for Crossref XML as an article upload format. In the future this may also be extended to the API and we may also integrate directly with Crossref to harvest articles for you. We support the current Crossref schema (4.7) and we will be supporting new versions as they come along….”

New Pilot to encourage Finnish Open Access Journals to apply to DOAJ – News Service

“DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)and the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies (TSV) are collaborating on a pilot project to encourage and help peer-reviewed open access (OA) journals published in Finland to be indexed in DOAJ. The Pilot runs from May 2019 to May 2020….”

View of Discovering Open Access Engineering Journals | Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

Abstract:  This study examines the indexing of open access journals in the engineering disciplines. The sample used in this study was generated from a title listing pulled from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in late 2013. Indexing data from four prominent commercial databases in the discipline, Compendex, Web of Science, Inspec, and Scopus, were gathered in late 2017. The four-year interval was a critical component to the methodology, in that it provided sufficient time for these open journals to establish themselves in the research marketplace and earn the attention of leading indexers. The study found that while no single database provided excellent coverage of the open access content, in aggregate, the four databases indexed journals currently listed by the DOAJ reasonably well. The study also found that the four commercial databases indexed current DOAJ content at a much higher rate than content that was no longer listed in the DOAJ.

Where Can I Publish? Part 2: Is there a definitive list? – Delta Think

“We set out to examine whether there is a definitive, curated list of journals that researchers can use when deciding on their publication venue. While some offer very good coverage, the short answer appears to be that no one index offers a definitive list.

Across all journals, there seems to be overlap of significant proportions of the mainstream indexes. However, fully OA journals present a more varied landscape. You need to combine multiple lists to round up a comprehensive list of curated fully OA journals.

Our analysis has combined over 100,000 ISSNs across over 65,000 titles and, we think it represents one of the most comprehensive round ups of the coverage of curated lists available….”

Myth-busting: Journals must meet the DOAJ Seal criteria to be indexed in DOAJ – News Service

“There is a common misunderstanding that for a journal to have its application accepted and be indexed in DOAJ it must meet all the criteria for the DOAJ Seal. There is an assumption, born out of that misunderstanding, that journals in DOAJ without the Seal are of inferior quality. This is also a myth….”

Myth-busting: DOAJ takes too long to reach a decision – News Service

“From about 2012 until 2017, DOAJ was struggling to keep on top of the amount of applications being received.

Implementing new acceptance criteria and making 9900+ journals reapply exacerbated the problem and suddenly we had many reapplications and new applications coming in at the same time.

All applications go through an initial review to filter out incomplete or substandard applications. We call this process Triage. (From March 2015 to November 2017, Triage rejected 3112 sub-quality, incomplete or duplicate applications.)  Today, the average turnaround on an application from submission to initial review is a few days at the most….”

DOAJ: handmaiden to despots? or, OA, we need to talk | Sustaining the Knowledge Commons / Soutenir les savoirs communs

“As any movement grows and flourishes, decisions made will turn out to have unforeseen consequences. Achieving the goals of the movement requires critical reflection and occasional changes in policy and procedure.The purpose of this post is to point out that the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) appears to be inadvertently acting as a handmaiden to at least one despotic government, facilitating dissemination of works subject to censorship and rejecting open access journals that would be suitable venues for critics of the despotic government. There is no blame and no immediately obvious remedy, but solving a problem begins with acknowledging that a problem exists and inviting discussion of how to avoid and solve the problem. OA friends, please consider this such an invitation….”