How to update the information that we have about your journal – DOAJ News Service

“When Plan S’ Journal Checker Tool (JCT) launches, some publishers might want to make sure that their journals’ entries in DOAJ include the most up-to-date information and, if not, submit updates to us. If you think that Plan S affects your journals, then here is how to submit an update.

For publishers with twenty or more journals in DOAJ

Over the next few days, we will email a CSV file to you. This file will contain a copy of your journal records, as they are in DOAJ today. You must check each field in the file and make updates where appropriate. For its first iteration, the JCT is using DOAJ to check for licensing information so you should check that the licensing information is correct, at the very least.

Once we receive the file back from you, we will check it against your journals’ websites, correct it if necessary and then load it into the database. The live journals records will be updated immediately….”

CLOCKSS is Collaborating to Improve the Preservation of Open Access Journals – CLOCKSS

“DOAJ, CLOCKSS Archive, Internet Archive, Keepers Registry/ISSN International Centre and Public Knowledge Project (PKP) have agreed to partner to provide an alternative pathway for the preservation of small-scale, APC-free, Open Access journals.

The recent study authored by M.Laakso, L.Matthias, and N.Jahn has revived academia’s concern over the disappearance of the scholarly record disseminated in Open Access (OA) journals.

Their research focuses on OA journals as at risk of vanishing, and “especially small-scale and APC-free journals […] with limited financial resources” that often “opt for lightweight technical solutions” and “cannot afford to enroll in preservation schemes.” The authors have used data available in the Directory of Open Access Journals to come up with the conclusion that just under half of the journals indexed in DOAJ participate in preservation schemes. Their findings “suggest that current approaches to digital preservation are successful in archiving content from larger journals and established publishing houses but leave behind those that are more at risk.” They call for new preservation initiatives “to develop alternative pathways […] better suited for smaller journals that operate without the support of large, professional publishers.” …”

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

SCOSS meets major milestones: DOAJ reaches funding goal – SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services

“SCOSS has met a major milestone. The Directory of Open Access Journals, one of two Open infrastructure services recommended during our pilot funding cycle, has met its funding goal of 1,370 000 Euros. The drive kicked off in late 2018; over the course of the past two years, more than 216 institutions from 19 countries contributed to DOAJ….”

SCOSS meets major milestones: DOAJ reaches funding goal – SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services

“SCOSS has met a major milestone. The Directory of Open Access Journals, one of two Open infrastructure services recommended during our pilot funding cycle, has met its funding goal of 1,370 000 Euros. The drive kicked off in late 2018; over the course of the past two years, more than 216 institutions from 19 countries contributed to DOAJ….”

Designing for better accessibility in open access scholarly publishing – DOAJ News Service

“Accessibility has always been a top priority in doaj.org’s redesign project, along with improving:

user experience,
navigation, and
responsiveness on various devices, browsers, and operating systems.

We approached the project with the idea that accessibility, as opposed to branding and visual design, is foundational to all of these elements….”

Comment on “Open is not forever: a study of vanished open access journals”

Abstract:  We comment on a recent article by Laakso et al. (arXiv:2008.11933 [cs.DL]), in which the disappearance of 176 open access journals from the Internet is noted. We argue that one reason these journals may have vanished is that they were predatory journals. The de-listing of predators from the Directory of Open Access Journals in 2014 and the abundance of predatory journals and awareness thereof in North America parsimoniously explain the temporal and geographic patterns Laakso et al. observed.