Principles for disseminating scientific innovations | Broad Institute

“As an academic non-profit research institute [associated with Harvard and MIT], Broad recognizes the unique role that such institutions play in propelling the biomedical ecosystem by exploring fundamental questions and working on risky, early-stage projects that often lack clear economic return.

To maximize its impact, our work (including discoveries, data, tools, technologies, knowledge, and intellectual property) should be made readily available for use, at no cost, by other academic and non-profit research institutions….

With respect to commercial licensing, our most important consideration is maximizing public benefit.

  • In most cases, we believe that this goal is best accomplished through non-exclusive licensing, which allows many companies to use innovations and thus compete to bring to market products incorporating them.
  • In some cases, we recognize that an exclusive license to an innovation may be necessary to justify the level of private investment required to develop a product and bring it to market. (An example is the composition-of-matter of drug. Without an exclusive license, a company would be reluctant to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in a clinical trial to demonstrate safety and efficacy, because competitors could subsequently ‘free-ride’ on their results to bring the same product to market.)

In each case, we evaluate the justification for exclusivity and seek to limit the scope of exclusivity….”

ImmPort Home

“ImmPort is funded by the NIH, NIAID and DAIT in support of the NIH mission to share data with the public. Data shared through ImmPort has been provided by NIH-funded programs, other research organizations and individual scientists ensuring these discoveries will be the foundation of future research….

The Immunology Database and Analysis Portal (ImmPort) has been developed under the ImmPort Contract by the Northrop Grumman Information Technology Health Solutions team for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation (DAIT).

ImmPort is a partnership between researchers at the University of California-San Francisco, Stanford University, the University of Buffalo, the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and Northrop Grumman.

The goals of the ImmPort project are to:

  • Provide an open access platform for research data sharing
  • Create an integrated environment that broadens the usefulness of scientific data and advances hypothesis-driven and hypothesis-generating research
  • Accelerate scientific discovery while extending the value of scientific data in all areas of immunological research
  • Promote rapid availability of important findings, making new discoveries available to the research community for further analysis and interpretation
  • Provide analysis tools to advance research in basic and clinical immunology…

Private data and pre-release data are stored in private workspaces of investigators at the ImmPort site located at NIAID….”

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Data Management for Biomedical Big Data

The Countway Library of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School has received funding from the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative for Research Education, to develop a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Data Management for Biomedical Big Data. This MOOC is is built upon and expands the training materials of the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC), developed by several libraries in the New England region. 

The Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management course is hosted by the Canvas Network and provides training to librarians, biomedical researchers, undergraduate and graduate biomedical students, and other individuals interested on best practices for discoverability, access, integrity, reuse value, privacy, security, and long term preservation of biomedical research data. The course is free and self-paced….”

Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management – Canvas Network | Free online courses | MOOCs

“Biomedical research today is not only rigorous, innovative and insightful, it also has to be organized and reproducible. With more capacity to create and store data, there is the challenge of making data discoverable, understandable, and reusable. Many funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring publication of relevant data to promote open science and reproducibility of research.

In order to meet to these requirements and evolving trends, researchers and information professionals will need the data management and curation knowledge and skills to support the access, reuse and preservation of data.

This course is designed to address present and future data management needs….”

Open Access in Biomedical Research (September 2012)

“In recognition of the importance of open access to the biomedical sciences, the European Medical Research Councils (EMRC) of the European Science Foundation (ESF), at the instigation of its Core Group member Professor Josef Syka of the Czech Science Foundation and the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (GA?R and AV?R), launched an activity to investigate what, if any, steps EMRC could usefully take to improve the open access landscape in the biomedical field across Europe…. The many valuable inputs from participants made it clear that the current model for accessing biomedical research is far from ideal and that all research stakeholders (funding agencies, publishers, research performing institutions, research libraries and learned societies) need to work together to shift to an open access model in the field. However, a number of potential hurdles, discussed in this briefing, remain to be overcome…. [T]his briefing makes a number of recommendations: 1. There is a moral imperative for open access: research papers should be made freely available to all to read, use and re-use, with appropriate acknowledgement, in order to maximise the value of biomedical research, build on the body of knowledge, accelerate the process of discovery and improve human health. 2. Individual agencies must work together to raise awareness of the moral imperative for open access: agencies and organisations that fund and perform research, libraries, publishers and researchers must work in concert to raise awareness of the moral imperative for open access publishing. National, European and international partnerships are the basis for the successful achievement of open access to research outputs. Specific actions that different agencies need to undertake in order to move towards this goal are outlined in this briefing. 3. All research stakeholders should work together to support the extension of Europe PubMed Central into a Europe-wide PubMed Central: in order to facilitate discoveries and innovation in biomedical research, research stakeholders should collaborate to establish a Europe-wide repository in biomedicine as a partner site to the US equivalent PubMed Central. The recently rebranded Europe PubMed Central represents a valuable means to achieving this goal, provided that the diversity of European partner mandates and policies can be integrated….”

Which domains do open-access journals do best in? A 5-year longitudinal study – Yan – 2018 – Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Although researchers have begun to investigate the difference in scientific impact between closed-access and open-access journals, studies that focus specifically on dynamic and disciplinary differences remain scarce. This study serves to fill this gap by using a large longitudinal dataset to examine these differences. Using CiteScore as a proxy for journal scientific impact, we employ a series of statistical tests to identify the quartile categories and disciplinary areas in which impact trends differ notably between closed- and open-access journals. We find that closed-access journals have a noticeable advantage in social sciences (for example, business and economics), whereas open-access journals perform well in medical and healthcare domains (for example, health profession and nursing). Moreover, we find that after controlling for a journal’s rank and disciplinary differences, there are statistically more closed-access journals in the top 10%, Quartile 1, and Quartile 2 categories as measured by CiteScore; in contrast, more open-access journals in Quartile 4 gained scientific impact from 2011 to 2015. Considering dynamic and disciplinary trends in tandem, we find that more closed-access journals in Social Sciences gained in impact, whereas in biochemistry and medicine, more open-access journals experienced such gains.

Shire says all its studies will publish in open access journals – PMLiVE

“In a drive towards greater transparency, Shire has said that in future its peer review articles will only be submitted to journals that provide open access to the full text of papers.”

“It believes it is the first biopharma company to implement this open access policy, and also reckons it is the “only company to report the results from all of its clinical studies posted on clinicaltrials.gov”, the US trials registry.”

Harvard researchers to help develop cloud-based NIH Data Commons platform – Harvard Gazette

“The National Institute of Health has announced that Harvard co-Principal Investigators Dr. Mercè Crosas and Dr. Timothy Clark are NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Awardees.

The awards are part of the National Institutes of Health’s new Data Commons program, which will be implemented in a 4-year pilot phase to explore the feasibility and best practices for making digital objects including very large-scale genomics resources, available and computable through collaborative platforms. This will be done on public clouds, virtual spaces where service providers make resources, such as applications and storage, available over the internet. The goal of the NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase is to accelerate biomedical discoveries by making biomedical research data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) for more researchers….”

Human genome data ‘should be open to all’

“A leading genomic scientist has called on people who have their DNA analysed to make the full results openly available “for the greater public good”. …While conceding that “open access to genome sequences is not for everyone”, he hoped that many people would donate their genomes openly to science once they understood the risks and benefits….”