Inria – Simplifying OA Policy Compliance for Authors Through a Publisher- Repository Partnership

Abstract:  In April of 2015, Canadian Science Publishing (CSP) in partnership with the University of Toronto Libraries launched an automated manuscript deposit service. Upon author’s opt-in, an automated workflow transfers their accepted manuscript from the publisher system into the University of Toronto research repository, TSpace, where it is made openly available with a reference to the final version on the journal website. This free service is available to authors publishing their work in CSP’s NRC Research Press journals and is of particular interest to grant recipients looking to comply with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications that came into effect in 2015. This paper provides an overview of the partnership and the workflow that makes over 1,200 manuscripts openly available annually. It also shares the script that can be adopted by other libraries and publishers looking to provide automated deposit service to authors for the purpose of funder mandate compliance, green OA, or preservation.

How EIFL’s support helped open up East African research to the world | EIFL

“When EIFL organized the first-ever workshop on open access in Kenya in 2010, there were just seven institutional open access repositories in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Awareness about OA was limited, and very few universities had open access policies.

Seven years later, in 2017, over 50 new repositories had been set up and 33 institutions had adopted open access policies. There were almost 200,000 documents available in the repositories, and download numbers had run into the millions.

This two-page case study tells how EIFL, in collaboration with our partner library consortia, the Kenya Libraries and Information Services Consortium (KLISC), the Consortium of Tanzania Universities and Research Libraries (COTUL) and the Consortium of Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), helped open up East African research to the world….”

Compliance is not the whole story | Unlocking Research

“Today, Research England released Monitoring sector progress towards compliance with funder open access policies the results of a survey they ran in August last year in conjunction with RCUK, Wellcome Trust and Jisc.

Cambridge University was one of the 113 institutions that answered a significant number of questions about how we were managing compliance with various open access policies, what systems we were using and our decision making processes.”

EU set to snub hybrid open-access journals

“The EU’s 2021-27 R&D programme will not pay for articles to be published in hybrid open-access journals under proposals published by the European Commission.

Horizon Europe will pay article processing charges only “for purely open-access publishing venues (i.e. not ‘hybrid’ journals)” under Commission proposals published on 7 June. The current programme Horizon 2020 does support hybrid journals. The change would be controversial as it could prevent researchers from publishing in their first-choice locations….

A Commission source told Research Europe that the Commission is dropping its support for hybrid journals in part because they “do not currently appear to support a transition towards full open-access publishing models”. The source added that national funders are better placed to negotiate with publishers on the offsetting of subscription fees in hybrid models….

The Commission’s move will force researchers funded by Horizon Europe to publish either in fully open-access journals or through the green model if they want the programme to foot the bill.

Steven Inchcoombe, chief publishing officer at Springer Nature, said the decision was “likely to decrease open-access publication overall and risk a significant regression in open-access uptake” because hybrid journals “play an important role in aiding the transition to open access”. Springer Nature reported last month that it published about 3,900 articles with UK-based corresponding authors in its hybrid journals in 2017, compared with about 4,450 articles in its fully open-access journals….”

 

Openness and Sharing of Agricultural Research Outputs In India – Google Docs

“You are invited to join us in writing this crowd-sourced article. The side-headings are only suggestive and you may add to the list. You may also share this document <https://bit.ly/2JyuAjc> with your colleagues and friends whom you may think can contribute substantially.  Contact: Sridhar Gutam <gutam2000@gmail.com>….”

Help us improving the indicators!

“The Open Science Monitor tracks the development of open science trends in Europe.

Initially launched in 2017 to support the EU policies, the OSM has been revamped in May 2018 with updated data and visual identity. But open science is continuously developing, and over the next months, new trends, indicators, and data will be added. 

We need the input of the open science community to improve the indicators and identify new data sources, as illustrated in the methodological note (pdf). Below, you can comment on the individual indicators of the OSM. Your comments will help improve the Open Science Monitor….

This consultation will remain open for the full duration of the project, but in order to actually improve the methodology, the deadline for contribution is August 31st, 2018….”

Open science monitor | European Commission

“The Open Science Monitor aims to

  • provide data and insight to understand the development of open science in Europe
  • gather the most relevant and timely indicators on the development of open science in Europe and other global partner countries

The Open Science Monitor will also support European Commission initiatives such as the Open Science Policy Platform and the Open Science Cloud….

The Open Science Monitor will be updated on a regular basis in the course of the project, until the end of 2019. Over the next months, new indicators and data will be uploaded….

The Open Science Monitor is a collaborative effort and welcomes the contribution of the community. You can read the methodological note below, and provide your comments online on how to improve the specific indicators….

Sign of an unexpected way in which #Brexit could help #openaccess?

“…This doesn’t have to be read as a sign that Brexit could help OA. But here’s how to read it that way. Non-EU nations who clear certain hurdles can already benefit from EU research funds, and those funds are subject to an #openaccess mandate. If the UK leaves the EU, then the EC may lower those hurdles. This wouldn’t increase the amount of money with an OA string on it. (Horizon 2020 is what it is.) But it would spread the European OA mandate to more countries, making OA closer to the default in more places.”

Open Access Policy Adopted by IU Bloomington Faculty | Indiana University Libraries

“In 2017, the Bloomington Faculty Council unanimously approved an Open Access policy that ensures that faculty scholarship will be accessible and available to the public for future generations. Adopting such a policy reduces barriers to research and learning by making research available on the public internet to be downloaded and shared freely, making it possible for scholarship to be more widely read and cited than literature that appears in closed-access, licensed journal databases. The policy can be found at IUB’s VPFAA site and an FAQ has been posted to our website. The Scholarly Communication staff will be available to help authors deposit their work in IUScholarWorks Open, our repository for the Open Access policy.. Faculty members may also contact us to opt-out of the policy or opt-out themselves using the same repository. Resources are available for faculty who are interested in learning more about the impact and implementation of the policy. Please direct questions to iusw@indiana.edu or the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs.”