UoH, first in the country, adopts online education policy

“The University of Hyderabad (UoH) has adopted Online Educational Policy (OEP), the first Central University in the country. Addressing a joint press conference here today, University Vice chancellor Prof Appa Rao Podile and University Faculty Coordinator Prof J Prabhakar Rao, said as the European Union funded International Collaborative project (EU Project) ending this month, the University has adopted OEP. Under this policy, the University has set up an e-Learning centre where developing studio and multi media and other infrastructure with an estimated cost of About Rs 60 lakhs, will formally launch in couple of months, they informed. The aim of the centre is to promote, implement online courses designed by the teachers of the University, providing training to the teachers on developing e-Content by using enhanced technology of teaching and learning and operation, maintaining E-labs, virtual classroom, video conferencing room, they said. As per the UGS mandatory, 20 per cent of regular courses made on online by the UoH, they said the centre will also develop online courses Swayam platform which is a initiative of HRD Ministry to promote Open Educational Resources (OERs). There are plans to go for National and International collaborations for developing these, however, the centre initially focus on Capacity Buildign courses for both teachers and students, they added. Mr Prabhakar said that the EU project, which started in 2013, implemented by consortium of six university partners (four from India and two from Europe). Funding over one million Euros for the all six universities . The main objective of the project to enhance the quality, access and governance of undergraduate education in India through technology enabled learning with Indo-EU Higher Education partnerships and collaborations, he added.”

WHO | Major research funders and international NGOs to implement WHO standards on reporting clinical trial results

“Some of the world’s largest funders of medical research and international non-governmental organizations today agreed on new standards that will require all clinical trials they fund or support to be registered and the results disclosed publicly.”

Restriction in the use of the RCUK Open Access Block Grant. | Library News

“Due to increased demand for ‘gold’ open access and a significant reduction in the University’s RCUK open access block grant allocation, the Open Access Team has introduced a restriction on the use of the fund for the payment of Article Processing Charges (APCs).

The Open Access Team has ring-fenced the remaining allocation for the following types of costs:

  • APCs for fully Open Access journals (i.e., journals which do not sell subscriptions and in which all articles are Open Access, e.g., BioMed Central, PLOS One, Nature Communications)
  • APCs for journals that do not offer a Green Open Access option that complies with RCUK’s Open Access policy

In most cases it is possible for RCUK funded authors to comply with its Open Access policy by making papers Green Open Access (i.e., uploading your Accepted Manuscript to Pure which will be made freely available after a specified embargo period).

The restriction in use of the block grant will commence from the 1st June 2017 onwards.”

Passing a Campus Open Access Policy – OpenCon

“On March 31, Florida Gulf Coast University’s (FGCU) Faculty Senate passed an Open Access policy! The Open Access Archiving Policy ensures that future scholarly articles authored by FGCU faculty will be made freely available to the public by requiring faculty to deposit copies of their accepted manuscripts in the university’s repository, DigitalFGCU.”

Chemistry in Europe • 2017-2 – EuCheMS Newsletters

“About a year ago, Carlos Moedas, the EU Research Commissioner, established a high-level expert group on Open Science, the Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP), a topic that is of increasing relevance to the Commission and which will have and already has had significant effects on the European science policy, in particular on Horizon 2020.

The OSPP’s main objective is to advise the Commission on the further development and implementation of the open science policy

The OSPP consists of 25 members, representing the various stakeholders: universities, research organisations, academies/learned societies, funding organisations, citizen science organisations, publishers, open science platforms, and libraries. Together with Christophe Rossel, President of the European Physical Society, I represent the European learned societies.  The OSPP’s main objective is to advise the Commission on the further development and implementation of the open science policy, which Commissioner Moedas defined as one of his priorities.”

Going Green: a year of supporting the HEFCE OA Policy | Library Research Plus

“In total there’s a 55% Green OA/45% Gold OA split, and given that Green OA represents more inconvenience than most of our academic colleagues unfamiliar with arXiv have ever been willing to tolerate, it is very unlikely indeed that the University would have achieved such high compliance had the Library not provided a mediated Green OA deposit service. The data confirms our approach helped make Green Open Access an organisational habit practically overnight. 

The approach has come at a cost however; over the past year, supporting the HEFCE OA policy has taken up the majority of the team’s bandwidth with most of our 9am-5pm conversations being in some way related to a paper’s compliance with one or more funder OA policy.

Now that our current processes have bedded in, and in anticipation of the launch of the new UK Scholarly Communications License (UK-SCL) – for more on this read Chris Banks’s article or watch her UKSG presentation – and further developments from Jisc, we hope that over the next 12 months we can tilt the balance away from this reductionist approach to our scholarly output and focus on other elements of the scholarly communication ecosystem. For example, we are already in discussions with Altmetric about incorporating their tools into our OA workflows to help our academics build connections with audiences and are keen to roll this out soon – from early conversations with academics we think this is something they’re really going to like.”

Green Is Not the New Gold: Beware of False Models for Open Access – ASCB

“Green OA would be an easy solution because it sounds like OA and seems to interfere minimally with current publishing mechanisms, but I will argue that it is an expensive halfway house with limited benefit to the scientific community or indeed the public. If we want OA to work in a sustainable manner for papers in high-quality, peer-reviewed journals, it has to be gold and not green. And even if we don’t care about peer review or quality control by journals, there is a better solution than institutional green OA for disseminating articles: the posting of preprints….”

Open Access Policies and Academic Freedom: Understanding and Addressing Conflicts

Abstract:  The adoption of open access (OA) policies that require participation rather than request it is often accompanied by concerns about whether such mandates violate researchers’ academic freedoms. This issue has not been well explored, particularly in the Canadian context. However the recent adoption of an OA policy from Canada’s major funding agencies and the development of the Fair access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR) in the United States has made addressing the issue of academic freedom and OA policies an important issue in academic institutions. This paper will investigate the relationship between OA mandates and academic freedom with the context of the recent OA policy at the University of Windsor as a point of reference. While this investigation concludes that adopting OA policies that require faculty participation at the institutional level should not be an issue of academic freedom, it is important to understand the varied factors that contribute to this tension. This includes misunderstandings about journal based (gold) and repository based (green) OA, growing discontent about increased managerialism in universities and commercialization of research, as well as potential vagueness within collective agreements’ language regarding academic freedom and publication. Despite these potential roadblocks, a case can be made that OA policies are not in conflict with academic freedom given they do not produce the harms that academic freedom is intended to protect.