Politicians and R&D funders ‘finally pushing in same direction’ on science publishing | Science|Business

“A major push by science funding agencies in Europe to make the research they back freely available at the point of publication is the world’s best chance of fundamentally altering scientific publishing, says the new coordinator of Plan S, Johan Rooryck.

Last month the Plan S consortium of funders named Rooryck, professor of French linguistics at Leiden University in the Netherlands, as its new champion, with a brief to promote and develop the plan worldwide.

Currently there are 19 – mostly European – funders involved in Plan S. The initiative represents, “the first time we see policymakers and the main funders pushing in the same direction,” said Rooryck.

“We’ve been talking about open access for 25 years but it never accelerated in the way people wanted,” he said.

In common with other backers of open access, Rooryck argues commercial publishers have made excessive profits from scientific research that has been paid for from public money. Most commercial publishers have paywalls erected around the journals they publish, which in effect means public and charitable bodies have to buy access to the outputs of research projects that would not have gone ahead without their grant money….”

Society Publishers Accelerating Open Access and Plan S – Final Project Report

The final project report from the Society Publishers Accelerating Open access and Plan S (SPA-OPS) project. The report presents the results of work to identify and assess a range of potential models through which learned societies could successfully transition to the requirements of Plans S. Based on the research undertaken, the report sets out recommendations for learned society publishers and other stakeholders committed to supporting them in making this transition. This work was conducted by Alicia Wise and Lorraine Estelle of Information Power. The SPA-OPS project was commissioned by Wellcome, UKRI, and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP).

Plan S, Core Open Access Publishing Standards & Scholastica

Scholastica has released a Product Roadmap detailing new features to help journals comply with Plan S and sustainably meet core publishing standards. The roadmap page also includes answers to Plan S FAQs and a resources section to help publishers stay caught up on Plan S developments and work through the implementation guidelines.

Horizon 2020 and UK Research and Innovation Requirements for H2020 Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

“Twice a year, Jisc contacts Horizon2020-funded projects in the UK on behalf of OpenAIRE (www.openaire.eu) which supports the EC’s Open Access policies.  Jisc is the National Open Access Desk for OpenAIRE in the UK, and we contact project coordinators because there are particular Open Access obligations within most of the Horizon2020 projects for the EC:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions.
Open Research Data Pilot: Projects in designated areas of H2020 will participate in a pilot project to make the underlying data related to project outputs openly available and accessible for use by other researchers, innovative industries and citizens.  If you have signed up to the pilot, you will need to make your research data openly available, as well.

How many OA publications does your project have? Take a look at your project page at: https://explore.openaire.eu/search/find/projects. You can use this page to help you with reporting!…”

Que faut-il faire pour que la science soit plus ouverte? (What needs to be done to make science more open?)

From Google’s English: 

“Open science is the practice of making research publications and data freely available. It takes advantage of the digital transition to develop open access to publications and, to the fullest extent possible, to research data.”

World Health Organization Backs Open-Access Plan S | The Scientist Magazine®

“The World Health Organization is joining cOAlition S, a growing group of agencies and charities that fund scientific research and that require their grantees to share their work in open-access journals or repositories. The coalition’s so-called Plan S aims to implement the open-access requirement for all of their funded research beginning January 1, 2021….”

World Health Organization Backs Open-Access Plan S | The Scientist Magazine®

“The World Health Organization is joining cOAlition S, a growing group of agencies and charities that fund scientific research and that require their grantees to share their work in open-access journals or repositories. The coalition’s so-called Plan S aims to implement the open-access requirement for all of their funded research beginning January 1, 2021….”

An Analysis of Open Science Policies in Europe v4 | Zenodo

“This document presents an updated review of Open Data and Open Science policies in Europe as of July 2019. It does not include Open Access to publications policy. This analysis goes more into depth on the types of policy in place in Europe, their processes of creation, and some of their specifics. This updated version of the deeper analysis reflects changes that have been identified between November 2018 and July 2019. We concentrate on the twenty-eight EU member states, but we also consider relevant countries from the European Research Area, namely Iceland, Norway, Serbia and Switzerland.

This report is the the fourth version of a report which was originally published in 2017….”