Laura and John Arnold Foundation contributes funding to launch Vivli, the Center for Global Clinical Research Data – Vivli

“Vivli, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit, has received $2 million from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation to build a first-of-its-kind data sharing platform for clinical trial research. The innovative platform will include a data repository, analysis tools and a dynamic search engine. It will provide transparency and access to clinical research data from around the globe, break data out of existing silos, and accelerate scientific discovery to improve human health.”

FFAR awards $1 million grant to create open source technology for gene discovery in plants | Crops | hpj.com

“The starting point will be approximately 1,000 human kinase inhibitors carefully selected from a library of chemical compounds donated to the partnership from eight pharmaceutical companies. The set will be distributed without restriction to scientists studying other plants and traits, thus serving as a broadly useful platform. The team has agreed to operate under open access principles —specifically prohibiting filing for IP on any of the results and will communicate the results widely….”

“Patent-Based Open Science” by Lee Petherbridge

Abstract:  The contemporary approach to innovation in the life sciences relies on a patent-based proprietary model. Limitations on patent rights and business concerns often focus innovation to markets where the near-term monetary rewards are highest. This is “efficient” under an austere understanding of the term, but the proprietary model can be problematic from a practical perspective because it may not focus innovation to certain deserving markets. This Article contends that the property rights conferred by patent law may still serve as a positive base for innovation directed to underserved markets. The comparatively strong rights conferred by patent law provide upstream or pioneering innovators the power to establish some of the environmental conditions in which subsequent innovation takes place. This includes a power to create an environment of relatively open access to rights, which in appropriate cases may foster efficiency gains, reduce innovation suppressive costs, and achieve production for ultimate consumers at closer to marginal cost. In several parts, this paper discusses the topography of law and innovation in the life sciences, the characteristics of innovation in the life sciences that may support the use of patents to impose an “open science” framework, a legal means of imposing such a framework using servitudes, and some of the legal and economic implications of using patents in this manner. This Article concludes that there are reasons why universities and research-oriented medical schools should sometimes favor this approach and that limited testing should be performed to determine the efficacy of the approach.

Q&A: An open-data evangelist preaches creative cooperation to speed drug development

“When Dr. Atul Butte thinks data, the word “big” can’t do it justice. He was honored by President Barack Obama’s administration as an “open science champion of change” in 2013 for his work at Stanford University to sift 400 trillion molecular, clinical, and epidemiological data points to find new medicines and disease-fighting insights — and to speed the process by making the data as public as possible.”

Global Access in Action

“Global Access in Action, a project of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, seeks to expand access to lifesaving medicines and combat the communicable disease burden that disproportionately harms the world’s most vulnerable populations. We accomplish this by conducting action-oriented research, supporting breakthrough initiatives, facilitating stakeholder dialogue, and providing policy advice to pharmaceutical firms on best practices to increase impact.  GAIA uses its pragmatic and neutral viewpoint to enable dialogue across traditional boundaries between government, industry, nonprofits, and academia, and to promote new, innovative solutions amongst these parties to create better outcomes.”

An artificial future | Research Information

“One of the most exciting data projects we [Elsevier] are working on at the moment is with a UK based charity, Findacure. We are helping the charity to find alternative treatment options for rare diseases such as Congenital Hyperinsulinism by offering our informatics expertise, and giving them access to published literature and curated data through our online tools, at no charge.

We are also supporting The Pistoia Alliance, a not-for-profit group that aims to lower barriers to collaboration within the pharmaceutical and life science industry. We have been working with its members to collaborate and develop approaches that can bring benefits to the entire industry. We recently donated our Unified Data Model to the Alliance; with the aim of publishing an open and freely available format for the storage and exchange of drug discovery data. I am still proud of the work I did with them back in 2009 on the SESL project (Semantic Enrichment of Scientific Literature), and my involvement continues as part of the special interest group in AI….”

Therapoid, from Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates and enables collaboration among life science researchers around the world!

 

There are highly qualified scientists everywhere. They want to collaborate. However, there is no comprehensive platform for them to do so – until now!

 

The Open Therapeutics’ Therapoid™ scientific ecosystem enables much more than just collaboration.

 

As a web platform for scientific collaboration Therapoid includes:

 

Open biotechnologies for advancing research and gaining publications,

Funding to further develop open biotechnologies,

An asset exchange that hosts freely available equipment and supplies,

A manuscript development process,

A preprint server for hosting manuscripts.

Goals of Open Therapeutics’ include lowering biotechnology and pharmaceutical costs, reducing the risks and time to develop life-saving therapies, and broadening markets for therapeutics, particularly for underserved populations around the world.”

Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates biopharma developments by enabling capable and responsible researchers around the world to collaborate. Open Therapeutics has two components: (i) an open web platform for scientific collaboration known as Therapoid™, and (ii) open biotechnologies for rapid prototyping of therapeutics.

Open Therapeutics™ enables open access, open collaboration, rapid prototyping, meritocracy, and community. The goal is to lower costs, reduce risks and time, and broaden markets for therapeutics.

The Therapoid™ web portal enables international scientists to share research easily, while it also opens a path to develop dormant technologies. Simple to use tools enable more effective collaboration. The combination of collaboration and biotechnologies will lead to better therapeutics for patients in every country….”

Open Insulin Project

“We’re a team of Bay Area biology nerds who believe that insulin should be freely available to anybody who needs it. So, we’re developing the first freely available, open protocol for insulin production. We hope our research will be the basis for generic production of this life-saving drug. Additionally, we hope our work inspires other biohackers to band together and create things nobody has ever thought of before!…”