NIH 3D Print Exchange | A collection of biomedical 3D printable files and 3D printing resources supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“3D printing technology is advancing at a rapid pace, but it is difficult to find or create 3D-printable models that are scientifically accurate or medically applicable. The NIH 3D Print Exchange provides models in formats that are readily compatible with 3D printers, and offers a unique set of tools to create and share 3D-printable models related to biomedical science….

Creative Commons licenses can be applied to models submitted to our database. Read our licensing policy to find find out more information on permission, attribution, and how to choose a license….”

 

APHA unlocks free public access to articles on firearms issues and research

“The American Public Health Association (APHA) is offering free access to peer-reviewed research articles and commentaries on firearms and public health published in the American Journal of Public Health. Available articles cover topics such as firearm storage practices in the United States, public opinion on the issue of carrying guns in public places, and state firearm laws. In a statement, the APHA says it hopes this action will “lead to smarter evidence-based policies that enhance firearm safety and violence prevention.” Going forward, the journal will continue free public access to all research on the topic.”

Gates Foundation Joins Wellcome Trust in Calling for Open Sharing of Research and Data Related to DRC Ebola Outbreak

“The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation strongly supports the Wellcome Trust’s call for the open sharing of all research findings and data relevant to the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We agree that it is imperative that research and data should be shared rapidly and openly during this and all future public health emergencies….”

American Gut: an Open Platform for Citizen Science Microbiome Research | mSystems

“Using standardized protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project and sample contributions from over 10,000 citizen-scientists, together with an open research network, we compare human microbiome specimens primarily from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia to one another and to environmental samples….We also demonstrate the utility of the living data resource and cross-cohort comparison to confirm existing associations between the microbiome and psychiatric illness and to reveal the extent of microbiome change within one individual during surgery, providing a paradigm for open microbiome research and education….

A unique aspect of the AGP is the open community process of assembling the Research Network and analyzing these data, which are released immediately on data generation. Analysis details are shared through a public forum….”

Social-media-enabled learning in emergency medicine: a case study of the growth, engagement and impact of a free open access medical education blog | Postgraduate Medical Journal

Abstract:  Background Clinicians are increasingly using social media for professional development and education. In 2012, we developed the St.Emlyn’s blog, an open access resource dedicated to providing free education in the field of emergency medicine.

Objective To describe the development and growth of this international emergency medicine blog.

Method We present a narrative description of the development of St.Emlyn’s blog. Data on scope, impact and engagement were extracted from WordPress, Twitter and Google Analytics.

Results The St.Emlyn’s blog demonstrates a sustained growth in size and user engagement. Since inception in 2012, the site has been viewed over 1.25?million times with a linear year-on-year growth. We have published over 500 blog posts, each of which attracts a mean of 2466 views (range 382–69?671). The site has been viewed in nearly every country in the world, although the majority (>75%) of visitors come from the USA, UK and Australia.

Summary This case study of an emergency medicine blog quantifies the reach and engagement of social-media-enabled learning in emergency medicine.

[Wellcome Trust consultation on revising its OA policy]

“Wellcome is conducting a review of its open access (OA) policy. The aim of this review is to ensure that knowledge and discoveries which arise from publications stemming from our funding are shared and used to maximise their benefit to health. This open consultation forms part of the review process and responses will be used by our internal working group to inform the outcome….”

Childrens Tumor Foundation Data Portal – syn6135075

“Welcome to the Children’s Tumor Foundation data portal. CTF has partnered with Sage Bionetworks to collate all NF-related research funded by CTF to provide a harmonized, usable resource for the NF scientific community.

This portal contains molecular and clinical data coming from the many projects that CTF is managing. In particular, this platform will be used by the Synodos consortia projects to execute their data analysis and integration, releasing their datasets during the length of the project in a timely fashion. You can navigate the project pages from the Wiki menu on the left and see some basic project information and link to the specific project data site….”

Open Science Policy Statements for AHA Funded Research

” ‘Outbound’ Public Access

The American Heart Association (AHA) requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding (“outbound” research) be made freely available in PubMed Central (PMC) within 12 months of publication. It is the responsibility of the awardee to ensure journal articles are deposited into PMC….

‘Inbound’ Public Access

All original research articles in the 11 subscription-model AHA journals (“inbound” research) are made freely available on each respective journal website 6 months after publication. All non-original research articles are made freely available on each respective journal web site 12 months after publication. Scientific statements and clinical practice guidelines are made freely available immediately on publication.

The Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) is the AHA open access journal. Because it utilizes an author pays model, the author pays for publication costs and retains copyright. The AHA is granted a nonexclusive license of all rights of copyright in and to the article. JAHA articles are deposited in PMC on publication….”

Doris Duke Medical Research Program Guidelines and Policies

See the OA policy at pp. 7-8.

“The foundation requires that any publication based on a DDCF-funded research project must be made freely available and downloadable online in a timely manner and with as few restrictions as possible, in order to ensure that DDCF-funded research can be accessed, read and built upon. Starting with grants made in 2013, DDCF grantees and their institutions must agree to fulfill this requirement by depositing all documents accepted for publication resulting from their DDCF-funded research project into the National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central (“PMC”) in accordance with the following stipulations:

? Documents are defined to include all authors’ final manuscripts accepted for publication, including all modifications from the publishing and peer review process (the “postprints”);

? Documents are to be deposited in PMC upon the grantee’s receipt of notification of acceptance for publication;

? Grantees may impose an embargo on PMC’s public release of the documents that ends no later than 12 months after the official date of publication. 8 Access to PMC is made available to the grantee through DDCF’s membership in the Health Research Alliance (HRA) (a national consortium of non-governmental, nonprofit funders of biomedical research and training) and DDCF’s registration of data about its clinical research grants in the HRA reporter database. DDCF will provide detailed instructions for depositing documents in PMC to grantees upon DDCF’s receipt of a fully executed grant agreement.”