The advantages of UK Biobank’s open access strategy for health research – Conroy – – Journal of Internal Medicine – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Ready access to health research studies is becoming more important as researchers, and their funders, seek to maximise the opportunities for scientific innovation and health improvements. Large?scale population?based prospective studies are particularly useful for multidisciplinary research into the causes, treatment and prevention of many different diseases. UK Biobank has been established as an open?access resource for public health research, with the intention of making the data as widely available as possible in an equitable and transparent manner. Access to UK Biobank’s unique breadth of phenotypic and genetic data has attracted researchers worldwide from across academia and industry. As a consequence, it has enabled scientists to perform world?leading collaborative research. Moreover, open access to an already deeply characterized cohort has encouraged both public and private sector investment in further enhancements to make UK Biobank an unparalleled resource for public health research and an exemplar for the development of open access approaches for other studies.

New CMAJ and CMAJ Open policy permitting preprints | CMAJ

The launch of the latest preprint server, MEDRxiv, specifically targeted at the clinical research community, is a sign of growing interest in preprints among health researchers. Preprints are scholarly papers that are posted by authors in an openly accessible platform, usually before submission to a journal for formal publication.1 There are now about 45 preprint servers in operation across academic disciplines, and the number of articles being posted is growing rapidly. In response to this trend, we have developed a policy on preprints that permits papers deposited in a preprint server to be considered for publication in CMAJ and CMAJ Open.

For researchers, preprints facilitate early and rapid dissemination of their work among the research community, which provides an opportunity for them to receive feedback from a wide audience that may improve the draft paper before journal submission. Preprints may help authors to establish precedence for a research finding or find potential collaborators for future work.1,2

More broadly, preprints may help reduce research waste and publication bias.2 Even good studies may have difficulty getting published at times because of negative results or limited generalizability. Preprint servers can facilitate dissemination of these study findings among the research community. And researchers can check whether there is recent research in an area they are considering exploring, which could reduce the likelihood of duplicative studies….”

Reproducibility and Transparency by Design | Molecular & Cellular Proteomics

Abstract:  To truly achieve reproducible research, having reproducible analytics must be a principal research goal. Biological discovery is not the only deliverable; reproducibility is an essential part of our research.

[From the body of the paper:] “As mandated data sharing resolves a portion of the overall transparency/reproducibility challenge, the unaddressed issue remains the sharing of analyses….” 

The complex nature of research dissemination practices among public health faculty researchers | Hanneke | Journal of the Medical Library Association

Abstract:  Objective: This study explores the variety of information formats used and audiences targeted by public health faculty in the process of disseminating research.

Methods: The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with twelve faculty members in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, asking them about their research practices, habits, and preferences.

Results: Faculty scholars disseminate their research findings in a variety of formats intended for multiple audiences, including not only their peers in academia, but also public health practitioners, policymakers, government and other agencies, and community partners.

Conclusion: Librarians who serve public health faculty should bear in mind the diversity of faculty’s information needs when designing and improving library services and resources, particularly those related to research dissemination and knowledge translation. Promising areas for growth in health sciences libraries include supporting data visualization, measuring the impact of non-scholarly publications, and promoting institutional repositories for dissemination of research.

Implementing the FAIR Data Principles in precision oncology: review of supporting initiatives | Briefings in Bioinformatics | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  Compelling research has recently shown that cancer is so heterogeneous that single research centres cannot produce enough data to fit prognostic and predictive models of sufficient accuracy. Data sharing in precision oncology is therefore of utmost importance. The Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR) Data Principles have been developed to define good practices in data sharing. Motivated by the ambition of applying the FAIR Data Principles to our own clinical precision oncology implementations and research, we have performed a systematic literature review of potentially relevant initiatives. For clinical data, we suggest using the Genomic Data Commons model as a reference as it provides a field-tested and well-documented solution. Regarding classification of diagnosis, morphology and topography and drugs, we chose to follow the World Health Organization standards, i.e. ICD10, ICD-O-3 and Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classifications, respectively. For the bioinformatics pipeline, the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practices using Docker containers offer a coherent solution and have therefore been selected. Regarding the naming of variants, we follow the Human Genome Variation Society’s standard. For the IT infrastructure, we have built a centralized solution to participate in data sharing through federated solutions such as the Beacon Networks.

Emerging technologies towards enhancing privacy in genomic data sharing | Genome Biology | Full Text

Abstract:  As the scale of genomic and health-related data explodes and our understanding of these data matures, the privacy of the individuals behind the data is increasingly at stake. Traditional approaches to protect privacy have fundamental limitations. Here we discuss emerging privacy-enhancing technologies that can enable broader data sharing and collaboration in genomics research.

Share or perish: Social media and the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing – McNamara – – International Journal of Mental Health Nursing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  The impact of published research is sometimes measured by the number of citations an individual article accumulates. However, the time from publication to citation can be extensive. Years may pass before authors are able to measure the impact of their publication. Social media provides individuals and organizations a powerful medium with which to share information. The power of social media is sometimes harnessed to share scholarly works, especially journal article citations and quotes. A non?traditional bibliometric is required to understand the impact social media has on disseminating scholarly works/research. The International Journal of Mental Health Nursing (IJMHN) appointed a social media editor as of 1 January 2017 to implement a strategy to increase the impact and reach of the journal’s articles. To measure the impact of the IJMHN social media strategy, quantitative data for the eighteen months prior to the social media editor start date, and the eighteen months after that date (i.e.: from 01 July 2015 to 30 June 2018) were acquired and analysed. Quantitative evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of one journal’s social media strategy in increasing the reach and readership of the articles it publishes. This information may be of interest to those considering where to publish their research, those wanting to amplify the reach of their research, those who fund research, and journal editors and boards.

To cure brain diseases, neuroscientists must collaborate: That’s why I’m giving my data away

L-DOPA remains the most effective therapy for Parkinson’s. But it was discovered back in the 1960s and no other disease-modifying therapy has emerged since then.

This is partly due to the complexity of the disease, but also because we haven’t done a good enough job sharing our protocols and data in an open and accessible manner, so others can take the next step forward and avoid making the same mistakes or repeating the same experiments over and over again.

That’s why I’m giving my lab’s standard methods away over the next year — making them available to anyone who would like to access them….”

Genetics Research turns a new [open access] leaf… | Genetics Research | Cambridge Core

“[W]e are delighted to announce that from January 2019, Genetics Research will convert to the open access model of publication. Genetics is an area where both authors and funders are showing substantial support for Open Access, with increasing author uptake of OA. It is our belief that converting Genetics Research to open access is the right solution for the journal and for the community. From January 2019, Genetics Research will publish all articles under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), which permits use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Subsequently, an Article Processing Charge (APC) will be payable by authors or their funder on acceptance of their primary research article. In the majority of cases, these costs are paid by the author, his or her institution, or a funder….”