Taylor & Francis input to UKRI Open Access Review – Taylor & Francis Newsroom

“We urge UKRI to focus on requiring immediate access only to the final published research output or version of record, with the certainty this OA route provides of research being trusted, validated, discoverable, curated and preserved in perpetuity. We believe that a permissive policy approach is the best way to achieve UKRI’s aims. Encouraging a diverse ecology will help support the development of innovative models and diversification of existing models, will accelerate the growth in OA and will allow new entrants to join the research communication ecosystem, encouraging competition. As we have outlined in our response, the zero embargo Green OA route is an unsustainable mechanism that implies creation of content that is not paid for. This actually runs counter to UKRI’s long term aspirations around opening up research outputs….

We encourage future OA policy in the UK to support a variety of publication venues, including those most preferred by their communities, irrespective of their open access model, as they are the vehicles that drive research, being used and trusted by their communities. We are exploring options for hybrid journals other than the APC-OA model that will allow them to make their publications more widely available. We are keen to explore with UKRI, other funders, and researchers how we can best support these journals as they move to OA, and how we can offer sustainable publication venues across disciplines….”

Taylor & Francis input to UKRI Open Access Review – Taylor & Francis Newsroom

“We urge UKRI to focus on requiring immediate access only to the final published research output or version of record, with the certainty this OA route provides of research being trusted, validated, discoverable, curated and preserved in perpetuity. We believe that a permissive policy approach is the best way to achieve UKRI’s aims. Encouraging a diverse ecology will help support the development of innovative models and diversification of existing models, will accelerate the growth in OA and will allow new entrants to join the research communication ecosystem, encouraging competition. As we have outlined in our response, the zero embargo Green OA route is an unsustainable mechanism that implies creation of content that is not paid for. This actually runs counter to UKRI’s long term aspirations around opening up research outputs….

We encourage future OA policy in the UK to support a variety of publication venues, including those most preferred by their communities, irrespective of their open access model, as they are the vehicles that drive research, being used and trusted by their communities. We are exploring options for hybrid journals other than the APC-OA model that will allow them to make their publications more widely available. We are keen to explore with UKRI, other funders, and researchers how we can best support these journals as they move to OA, and how we can offer sustainable publication venues across disciplines….”

How can we understand the different effects of UKRI’s open access policy on small learned societies in the humanities? | Samuel Moore

The UKRI open access consultation deadline is this Friday and we’re likely to see a flurry of responses leading up to it. One response to the consultation caught my eye today from the Friends of Coleridge, a society that ‘exists to foster interest in the life and works of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his circle’. I wanted to jot down a couple of thoughts on this because I think it represents something quite interesting about the way that open access is playing out within UK humanities organisations.
 

[…]

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Elsevier announce new publishing partnership

“The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and Elsevier, a global information analytics business specializing in science and health, are delighted to announce a new partnership to publish the ASBMB’s Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (MCP) and Journal of Lipid Research (JLR). As part of this agreement, all three titles will move to a gold open access (OA) publishing model, making articles immediately and permanently available for everyone to read, download, copy and distribute. The journals will be hosted on Elsevier’s leading online platform, ScienceDirect, beginning January 1, 2021….

Elsevier’s experience transitioning journals to gold open access was a key factor in their selection….”

PubMed Central archiving: a major milestone for a scholarly journal

“There are concerns that authors in developing countries and those lacking research funds are disadvantaged by Plan S and cut out of quality gold open-access journals.3 The latter, however, is largely compensated by the availability of platinum open-access journals, such as the MJR, where publishing and archiving charges are covered by professional societies, easing the authors’ and readers’ financial burden.4…”

ASBMB journals move to open access

“The ASBMB [American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology] is pleased to announce that the society’s three highly regarded journals — Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics and Journal of Lipid Research — will be fully open access beginning in January 2021….”

Biochemical Society and Portland Press suspend paywalls on all published content – Biochemistry

“We are all facing extraordinary times with the current Covid-19 pandemic and, in support of the community, Portland Press is suspending paywalls on all content published across the Biochemical Society’s seven journals until further notice. This means access to articles will be freely available to all, whether working remotely or in a laboratory, across the globe.

Making all of our content freely available means that we are able to support the community in ensuring that everyone has access to the best research and review content, whether they are researching the pandemic itself, related conditions, underlying pathways and therapeutics, or continuing research in other fields. We want to ensure that all researchers are unhindered in their work given the current circumstances.

As the wholly-owned publishing arm of the Biochemical Society, Portland Press has been able to respond quickly to researchers’ needs, ensuring that paywalls have been suspended as soon as possible.  …”

The purpose of publications in a pandemic and beyond | Wonkhe

“The virus is reminding us that the purpose of scholarly communication is not to allocate credit for career advancement, and neither is it to keep publishers afloat. Scholarly communication is about, well, scholars communicating with each other, to share insights for the benefit of humanity. And whilst we’ve heard all this before, in a time of crisis we realise afresh that this isn’t just rhetoric, this is reality….”