Guide to PHARMACOLOGY

This website, originally created in a collaboration between The British Pharmacological Society (BPS) and the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and now developed jointly with funding from the Wellcome Trust, is intended to become a “one-stop shop” portal to pharmacological information. One of the main aims is to provide a searchable database with quantitative information on drug targets and the prescription medicines and experimental drugs that act on them….The Guide to PHARMACOLOGY database is licensed under the Open Data Commons Open Database License (ODbL). Its contents are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license….”

Nebula Genomics: Blockchain-enabled genomic data sharing and analysis platform

“The first human genome was sequenced in 2001 at a cost of $3 billion. Today, human genome sequencing costs less than $1000, and in a few years the price will drop below $100. Thus, personal genome sequencing will soon be widely adopted as it enables better diagnosis, disease prevention, and personalized therapies. Furthermore, if genomic data is shared with researchers, the causes of many diseases will be identified and new drugs developed. These opportunities are creating a genomic data market worth billions of dollars….The Nebula peer-to-peer network will enable data buyers to acquire genomic data directly from data owners without middlemen. This will enable data owners to receive sequencing subsidies from data buyers and profit from sharing their data….”

Harvard Geneticist Launches DNA-Fueled Blockchain Startup

“Nebula Genomics will have its own coin and go head to head with Ancestry.com and Google-backed 23andMe. George Church, a professor at Harvard and MIT, is taking a different tack than his genetics testing rivals. He’s developed a token-fueled system on the blockchain that monetizes DNA to incentivize members to participate in genome sequencing. It keeps personal DNA data in the hands of the individual — not big pharma — letting them choose if they want to share and monetize that data for research purposes….Based on Professor Church’s research, no other human genomics company even comes close to delivering on what Nebula Genomics can do….Professor Chruch points to open protocol that gives scientists the ability to “aggregate standardized data” across people and databases. It’s unclear whether he plans on launching an upcoming ICO.”

Interview: ‘Everyone, Whether a Historian or a Geologist, Should Learn Mathematics’

“SR [Sandhya Ramesh]: What do you think about open science and open data?

SB [Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay]: That’s where the world is heading. All research done with taxpayer funds are open, and this is essentially how biology works already. A lot of biological data is available online free of cost, which helps researchers from countries like ours who cannot buy data. Same with software, too. The open source movement is prevalent, important and will continue. Healthcare especially can’t grow unless it’s global and open. But I’m curious to see how businesses will work around this….”

Expanded access to images in the Biodiversity Literature Repository

“The Biodiversity Literature Repository at Zenodo is holding now over 160,000 figures originally included in scientific publications and is daily updated. Each image is open access. It has a link to the original source – also included in the image metadata – and to related items, such as the taxonomic treatment that cites the image. Originally, Zenodo has been created as a repository for the deposition of single documents, research data, files, but with an option to automate the upload (and download) automatically using its API….”

Open Science, Open Data, Open Source: 21st century research skills for the life sciences by Pedro L. Fernandes and Rutger A. Vos | 2017 · GitBook

“Who is this for? The goal of these resources is to give a bird’s eye view of the developments in open scientific research. That is, we cover both social developments (e.g. the culture in various communities) as well as technological ones. As such, no part of the contents are especially in-depth or geared towards advanced users of specific practices or tools. Nevertheless, certain sections are more relevant to some people than to others. Specifically: The most interesting sections for Graduate students will be about navigating the literature, managing evolving projects, and publishing and reviewing. Lab technicians may derive the most benefit from the sections about capturing data, working with reproducibility in mind and sharing data. For data scientists, the sections on organizing computational projects as workflows, managing versions of data and source code, open source software development, and data representation will be most relevant. Principal investigators may be most interested in the sections on data management, data sharing, and coping with evolving projects. Scientific publishers may be interested to know how scientists navigate the literature, what the expectations are for enhanced publications, and the needs for data publishing. Science funders and policy makers may easily find value in the capturing data, data management, data sharing and navigating the literature. Science communicators may be more interested in exploring the content by starting with navigating the literature, working with reproducibility in mind and sharing data….”

The Human Protein Atlas

“The Human Protein Atlas is a Swedish-based program initiated in 2003 with the aim to map all the human proteins in cells, tissues and organs using integration of various omics technologies, including antibody-based imaging, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, transcriptomics and systems biology. All the data in the knowledge resource is open access to allow scientists both in academia and industry to freely access the data for exploration of the human proteome….The Human Protein Atlas program has already contributed to several thousands of publications in the field of human biology and disease and it is selected by the organization ELIXIR (www.elixir-europe.org) as a European core resource due to its fundamental importance for a wider life science community. The Human Protein Atlas consortium is funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation….”

The Human Protein Atlas

“The Human Protein Atlas is a Swedish-based program initiated in 2003 with the aim to map all the human proteins in cells, tissues and organs using integration of various omics technologies, including antibody-based imaging, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, transcriptomics and systems biology. All the data in the knowledge resource is open access to allow scientists both in academia and industry to freely access the data for exploration of the human proteome….The Human Protein Atlas program has already contributed to several thousands of publications in the field of human biology and disease and it is selected by the organization ELIXIR (www.elixir-europe.org) as a European core resource due to its fundamental importance for a wider life science community. The Human Protein Atlas consortium is funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation….”

PCI Evol Biol

“Peer Community in Evolutionary Biology (PCI Evol Biol) has been launched in January 2017. It is a community of 339 recommenders playing the role of editors who recommend unpublished preprints based on peer-reviews to make them complete, reliable and citable articles, without the need for publication in ‘traditional’ journals. Evaluation and recommendation by PCI Evol Biol are free of charge. When a recommender decides to recommend a preprint, he/she writes a recommendation text that is published along with all the editorial correspondence (reviews, recommender’s decisions, authors’ replies) by PCI Evol Biol. The preprint itself is not published by PCI Evol Biol; it remains in the preprint server where it has been posted by the authors. PCI Evol Biol recommenders can also recommend, but to a lesser extent, postprints….”

FAIRDOM

“Do you want to get the most impact from your research?   Are you tired of searching through old computer files to find the methods and data that link together?   Do you want to showcase your research from your best publications?  

FAIRDOM helps you to be in control of collecting, managing, storing, and publishing your data, models, and operating procedures. 

Join the hundreds of researchers who have improved research management practices in their lab, and for themselves using our software and expertise. …”