PLOS Joins Other Publishers and Societies in Support of the Proposed White House Policy Regarding Federally Funded Research

Note: PLOS and other prominent organizations delivered the following letter to the Trump Administration on January 17, 2020. We encourage all publishing organizations and scholarly societies who would like to join us in support of OA in the USA to reach out to us at community@plos.org — we can prepare an expanded letter with more signatories as necessary. Please also consider voicing your support on social media with the hashtag #OAintheUSA.

[Open letter to Donald Trump]

“On behalf of the undersigned national and regional library, research, publishing, and advocacy organizations, we are writing to express our commitment to ensuring that American taxpayers are guaranteed immediate, free, and unfettered access to the results of scientific research that their tax dollars support, and to encourage the Administration to support continued progress towards this shared goal. We strongly endorse updating existing U.S. policy to eliminate the current 12-month embargo period on articles reporting on publicly funded research, and to ensure that they are made immediately available under terms and conditions that allow their full reuse. To unlock the full value of our collective investment in science, the underlying data needed to validate an article’s conclusions, along with any corresponding software or code, should also be made immediately available….”

PeerJ Preprints Succumbs

“The number and range of preprint initiatives has been expanding for a few years now, with bioRxiv, medRxiv, chemRxiv, and socRxiv among a much longer list, some quite obscure.

The recent announcement that PeerJ Preprints won’t be posting any more preprints after the end of this month may represent the beginning of “preprint deflation,” the first obvious retreat in the preprint realm, a world that has been haunted by questions of financial viability since Day 1.

Even long-standing preprint servers like arXiv have wrestled with the expense and work involved in posting free drafts of papers. The systems, people, and bandwidth needed to support technology platforms longterm aren’t cheap. Preprint platforms are no exception. This year, arXiv moved from one part of Cornell to another, in what looked like an attempt to shuffle overheads out of budgetary approval scrutiny for a time — after all, as I’ve calculated, if you include these, arXiv is hemorrhaging money every year, and nobody seems to want to confront that possibility.

Other indications of preprint deflation are observable in the analyses I’ve done around bioRxiv and socRxiv. The goals of these platforms — to encourage collaboration and pre-publication review — aren’t shared by most users, with authors increasingly using the platforms as marketing adjuncts or to meet Green OA requirements after successful submission to a journal….”

PeerJ Preprints to stop accepting new preprints Sep 30th 2019

“PeerJ to offer only peer-reviewed open access journal publishing going forward.

PeerJ Preprints is a free service that launched in April 2013, just two months after publishing began in our more traditional peer-reviewed journal,…

With a sad heart, the time has come to stop accepting new submissions at PeerJ Preprints, secure in the knowledge that having helped lead this approach there are many good venues for authors to use instead. We will continue working with other preprint services and partners to support researchers in sharing their work in new innovative ways….”

PeerJ Preprints to stop accepting new preprints Sep 30th 2019

“PeerJ to offer only peer-reviewed open access journal publishing going forward.

PeerJ Preprints is a free service that launched in April 2013, just two months after publishing began in our more traditional peer-reviewed journal,…

With a sad heart, the time has come to stop accepting new submissions at PeerJ Preprints, secure in the knowledge that having helped lead this approach there are many good venues for authors to use instead. We will continue working with other preprint services and partners to support researchers in sharing their work in new innovative ways….”

PeerJ Preprints to stop accepting new preprints Sep 30th 2019

“PeerJ to offer only peer-reviewed open access journal publishing going forward.

PeerJ Preprints is a free service that launched in April 2013, just two months after publishing began in our more traditional peer-reviewed journal,…

With a sad heart, the time has come to stop accepting new submissions at PeerJ Preprints, secure in the knowledge that having helped lead this approach there are many good venues for authors to use instead. We will continue working with other preprint services and partners to support researchers in sharing their work in new innovative ways….”

Scientists who share data publicly receive more citations | Science Codex

“A new study finds that papers with data shared in public gene expression archives received increased numbers of citations for at least five years. The large size of the study allowed the researchers to exclude confounding factors that have plagued prior studies of the effect and to spot a trend of increasing dataset reuse over time. The findings will be important in persuading scientists that they can benefit directly from publicly sharing their data.

The study, which adds to growing evidence for an open data citation benefit across different scientific fields, is entitled “Data reuse and the open citation advantage”. It was conducted by Dr. Heather Piwowar of Duke University and Dr. Todd Vision of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and published today in PeerJ, a peer reviewed open access journal in which all articles are freely available to everyone….”

Scientists who share data publicly receive more citations | Science Codex

“A new study finds that papers with data shared in public gene expression archives received increased numbers of citations for at least five years. The large size of the study allowed the researchers to exclude confounding factors that have plagued prior studies of the effect and to spot a trend of increasing dataset reuse over time. The findings will be important in persuading scientists that they can benefit directly from publicly sharing their data.

The study, which adds to growing evidence for an open data citation benefit across different scientific fields, is entitled “Data reuse and the open citation advantage”. It was conducted by Dr. Heather Piwowar of Duke University and Dr. Todd Vision of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and published today in PeerJ, a peer reviewed open access journal in which all articles are freely available to everyone….”

Celebrating community growth and Open Science – PeerJ’s 2018 in review – PeerJ Blog

As 2018 comes to an end, we would like to take a moment and recognize the significant efforts of our staff, authors, editors, reviewers, and many collaborators over this past year. And what a year it has been at PeerJ! We are proud to share it has been another landmark year publishing excellent science and contributing to the development of Open Science worldwide.

Over the next few days, we will be highlighting the notable achievements and standout articles from the last year across our platforms. And a quick reminder that we are expanding in 2019 to launch five new peer-reviewed Open Access Chemistry journals….”