Green Open Access Pledge

“Preprints are a fast and cost-effective way to make findings openly available (‘Green Open Access’). Some publishers discourage preprints by delaying their sharing (’embargoes’) or forbidding their updating after peer-review (‘post-print’ or ‘author accepted manuscript’). If a critical mass of researchers were to unanimously declare their intention to share pre- and post-prints, however, publishers would be compelled to endorse these practices or lose the value donated to them by the research community.

Criteria

Every time you publish, deposit the final peer-reviewed preprint (i.e., ‘post-print’) in an indexed repository without embargo
Every time you review, only review for journals that allow post-prints to be shared without embargo (i.e., ‘Green’ journals on Sherpa/Romeo)…”

E-books at local libraries: Inside the fight between publishers and librarians over buying and lending policy.

“In July, Macmillan announced that come November, the company will only allow libraries to purchase a single copy of its new titles for the first eight weeks of their release—and that’s one copy whether it’s the New York Public Library or a small-town operation that’s barely moved on from its card catalog. This has sparked an appropriately quiet revolt. Librarians and their allies quickly denounced the decision when it came down, and now the American Library Association is escalating the protest by enlisting the public to stand with libraries by signing an online petition with a populist call against such restrictive practices. (The association announced the petition Wednesday at Digital Book World, an industry conference in Nashville, Tennessee.) What’s unclear is whether the association can get the public to understand a byzantine-seeming dispute over electronic files and the right to download them….”

Cambridge University signs San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | University of Cambridge

“The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press today announce that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are “measured accurately and evaluated wisely”. …”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

DORA 6 years out: A global community 14,000 strong – DORA

DORA turns 6 years old this week. Or, as we like to say, this year DORA reached 14,000—that’s how many people have signed DORA, and they come from more than 100 countries! Each signature represents an individual committed to improving research assessment in their community, in their corner of the world. And 1,300 organizations in more than 75 countries, in signing DORA, have publicly committed to improving their practices in research evaluation and to encouraging positive change in research culture….”

Supporters | Invest in Open Infrastructure

Our organizations support this global effort to sustain open scholarly infrastructure. We believe that a network of shared open systems and tools governed by and managed for the benefit of those who use them is an essential step towards creating a healthy scholarly ecosystem. By investing in, integrating, building on, and/or expanding current and emerging open infrastructure initiatives, we can ensure that the services and software that the scholarly community relies upon to share its work with all who need access is high-quality, reliable, persistently available, and operated in a manner consistent with our community’s values.

Sign now to add yourself and/or your organization as a supporter of Invest in Open Infrastructure….”

Invest in Open Infrastructure

We imagine a world in which communities of researchers, scholars, and knowledge workers across the globe are fully enabled to share, discover, and work together. It is clear that the needs of today’s diverse scholarly communities are not being met by the existing largely uncoordinated scholarly infrastructure, which is dominated by vendor products that take ownership of the scholarly process and data. We intend to create a new open infrastructure system that will enable us to work in a more integrated, collaborative and strategic way. It will support global connections and consistency where it is appropriate, and local and contextual requirements where that is needed….

See who’s supporting IOI and add yourself and/or your organization as a supporter….

The Census of Scholarly Communication Infrastructure is now open. We invite projects and programs, for profit and nonprofit corporations, and hosted initiatives of all kinds to contribute to this growing body of information….”

Lawyers and law students’ signatures needed for Supreme Court amicus brief in favor of publishing the law / Boing Boing

“Attentive reader will note that rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously) published the laws of Georgia — including the paywalled annotations to the state laws — in 2015, prompting the state to sue him and literally call him a terrorist; Malamud countersued in 2015 and won a huge victory in 2018, when the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled that the law could not be copyrighted.

Now, the State of Georgia wants to go to the Supreme Court to argue for its right to charge the people of Georgia to know which laws they are supposed to be following. There’s a lot at stake: Malamud has been threatened by Idaho, Oregon, Mississippi, and the District of Columbia for posting state laws and is being sued by six plaintiffs in DC for posting public safety laws, and has received a dozen more takedowns from Standards Development Organizations whose standards have been incorporated into state law.

Malamud and his counsel (Elizabeth Rader and Tom Goldstein and Eric Citron of Goldstein & Russell),are responding to Georgia’s petition and they are seeking amici: if you are a law student or practicioner they would like you to sign onto this amicus brief prepared by Jeff Pearlman by filling in this form….”

Lawyers and law students’ signatures needed for Supreme Court amicus brief in favor of publishing the law / Boing Boing

“Attentive reader will note that rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously) published the laws of Georgia — including the paywalled annotations to the state laws — in 2015, prompting the state to sue him and literally call him a terrorist; Malamud countersued in 2015 and won a huge victory in 2018, when the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled that the law could not be copyrighted.

Now, the State of Georgia wants to go to the Supreme Court to argue for its right to charge the people of Georgia to know which laws they are supposed to be following. There’s a lot at stake: Malamud has been threatened by Idaho, Oregon, Mississippi, and the District of Columbia for posting state laws and is being sued by six plaintiffs in DC for posting public safety laws, and has received a dozen more takedowns from Standards Development Organizations whose standards have been incorporated into state law.

Malamud and his counsel (Elizabeth Rader and Tom Goldstein and Eric Citron of Goldstein & Russell),are responding to Georgia’s petition and they are seeking amici: if you are a law student or practicioner they would like you to sign onto this amicus brief prepared by Jeff Pearlman by filling in this form….”