Cambridge University signs San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | University of Cambridge

“The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press today announce that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are “measured accurately and evaluated wisely”. …”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

UKRI signs San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment – UK Research and Innovation

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has signed an international declaration aimed at strengthening and promoting best practice in the way research is assessed.

The San Francisco Declaration of Research Assessment (DORA) recognises the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of research are evaluated with regards to appropriate use of metrics and makes high-level recommendations for how this can be achieved. DORA includes specific recommendations for funders and organisations that undertake evaluation.

The seven Research Councils* are current signatories, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England was a signatory. Research Councils UK (RCUK), the umbrella organisation for the seven Research Councils before the formation of UKRI, signed DORA in February 2018.

UKRI is a member of the Plan S coalition, an international initiative launched to make full and immediate open access to research publications a reality. Plan S recognises DORA and that research needs to be assessed on its own merits rather than on the venue of publication….”

DORA 6 years out: A global community 14,000 strong – DORA

DORA turns 6 years old this week. Or, as we like to say, this year DORA reached 14,000—that’s how many people have signed DORA, and they come from more than 100 countries! Each signature represents an individual committed to improving research assessment in their community, in their corner of the world. And 1,300 organizations in more than 75 countries, in signing DORA, have publicly committed to improving their practices in research evaluation and to encouraging positive change in research culture….”

Supporters | Invest in Open Infrastructure

Our organizations support this global effort to sustain open scholarly infrastructure. We believe that a network of shared open systems and tools governed by and managed for the benefit of those who use them is an essential step towards creating a healthy scholarly ecosystem. By investing in, integrating, building on, and/or expanding current and emerging open infrastructure initiatives, we can ensure that the services and software that the scholarly community relies upon to share its work with all who need access is high-quality, reliable, persistently available, and operated in a manner consistent with our community’s values.

Sign now to add yourself and/or your organization as a supporter of Invest in Open Infrastructure….”

Invest in Open Infrastructure

We imagine a world in which communities of researchers, scholars, and knowledge workers across the globe are fully enabled to share, discover, and work together. It is clear that the needs of today’s diverse scholarly communities are not being met by the existing largely uncoordinated scholarly infrastructure, which is dominated by vendor products that take ownership of the scholarly process and data. We intend to create a new open infrastructure system that will enable us to work in a more integrated, collaborative and strategic way. It will support global connections and consistency where it is appropriate, and local and contextual requirements where that is needed….

See who’s supporting IOI and add yourself and/or your organization as a supporter….

The Census of Scholarly Communication Infrastructure is now open. We invite projects and programs, for profit and nonprofit corporations, and hosted initiatives of all kinds to contribute to this growing body of information….”

Lawyers and law students’ signatures needed for Supreme Court amicus brief in favor of publishing the law / Boing Boing

“Attentive reader will note that rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously) published the laws of Georgia — including the paywalled annotations to the state laws — in 2015, prompting the state to sue him and literally call him a terrorist; Malamud countersued in 2015 and won a huge victory in 2018, when the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled that the law could not be copyrighted.

Now, the State of Georgia wants to go to the Supreme Court to argue for its right to charge the people of Georgia to know which laws they are supposed to be following. There’s a lot at stake: Malamud has been threatened by Idaho, Oregon, Mississippi, and the District of Columbia for posting state laws and is being sued by six plaintiffs in DC for posting public safety laws, and has received a dozen more takedowns from Standards Development Organizations whose standards have been incorporated into state law.

Malamud and his counsel (Elizabeth Rader and Tom Goldstein and Eric Citron of Goldstein & Russell),are responding to Georgia’s petition and they are seeking amici: if you are a law student or practicioner they would like you to sign onto this amicus brief prepared by Jeff Pearlman by filling in this form….”

Lawyers and law students’ signatures needed for Supreme Court amicus brief in favor of publishing the law / Boing Boing

“Attentive reader will note that rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously) published the laws of Georgia — including the paywalled annotations to the state laws — in 2015, prompting the state to sue him and literally call him a terrorist; Malamud countersued in 2015 and won a huge victory in 2018, when the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled that the law could not be copyrighted.

Now, the State of Georgia wants to go to the Supreme Court to argue for its right to charge the people of Georgia to know which laws they are supposed to be following. There’s a lot at stake: Malamud has been threatened by Idaho, Oregon, Mississippi, and the District of Columbia for posting state laws and is being sued by six plaintiffs in DC for posting public safety laws, and has received a dozen more takedowns from Standards Development Organizations whose standards have been incorporated into state law.

Malamud and his counsel (Elizabeth Rader and Tom Goldstein and Eric Citron of Goldstein & Russell),are responding to Georgia’s petition and they are seeking amici: if you are a law student or practicioner they would like you to sign onto this amicus brief prepared by Jeff Pearlman by filling in this form….”

MoveOn Petitions – Support the UC’s “publish & read” proposal to Elsevier

“If you edit, review, or author articles in an Elsevier journal and support the principle that all academic research should be openly accessible to academics, PhDs in industry, policy makers, and the general public who funds research, you’re invited to sign this petition in support of an Open Letter to Elsevier, co-authored by members of Elsevier editorial boards. 

 

This letter, pasted below and available with links to sources here (https://goo.gl/6vH5zp) supports a recent proposal by the University of California to renegotiate its terms of subscription with Elsevier, in a deal that would have retained existing journals, editorial teams, and even Elsevier profits, but would have funded Open Access publishing charges for UC authors, making their work openly accessible. Unfortunately, Elsevier rejected this proposal, leaving the UC without an active subscription. We urge Elsevier to reconsider the UC proposal, and we support the University of California’s effort to transform our current academic publishing system to one in which journal subscriptions include fees to fund Open Access for all research….”

Open Letter in Support of Funder Open Publishing Mandates

We, the undersigned, believe that the world’s scholarly literature is a public resource that only achieves its full value when it is freely available to all. For too long we have tolerated a pay-for-access business model for scholarly journals that is inequitable, impedes progress in our fields, and denies the public the full benefit of our work. We therefore welcome efforts on the part of public and private research funders to require that publications based on work they fund be made immediately freely and openly available without restrictions on access or use.

Funders are uniquely positioned to transform scholarly publishing by changing the explicit and implicit rules under which we all operate. We recognize that funder mandates may superficially limit our publishing options in the short term, but believe they will lead to a system that optimizes what we really care about: maximizing the reach of our scholarship and its value to the research community and public.

We understand that effective scholarly communication costs money, and support substantial investment in this endeavor, but only if it allows everyone to freely access and use the scholarly literature. We acknowledge that challenges remain, especially ensuring that all scholars everywhere have the unfettered ability to freely share their work and have their contributions recognized. And we therefore commit to continue working with funders, universities, research institutions and other stakeholders until we have created a stable, fair, effective and open system of scholarly communication….”