Crispr pioneer among University of California researchers boycotting Elsevier | News | Chemistry World

“31 members of Cell Press editorial boards at the University of California (UC) have suspended their ‘editorial services’ to Elsevier as part of an on-going dispute between the university and publishing giant over the cost of journal subscriptions and open access. Among the signatories is Jennifer Doudna, one of the original developers of the Crispr gene-editing technique.

The open letter to Elsevier follows the collapse of negotiations to renew a contract between the university and the publishing giant in March, leading to the University of California cancelling its contract across its 10 campuses. The university sought reduced journal subscription costs and for all work published by its researchers in Elsevier’s journals to be open access, but the publisher refused. Last year, the university spent over $10.5 million (£8.3 million) in subscription and open access fees. Elsevier cut off the University of California’s access to newly published articles in July….”

UCCellPressEditorialBoardSuspensionsAlphabetical – Google Docs

“The undersigned University of California scientist members of Cell Press editorial boards are writing to inform you of our position, in light of the current impasse in negotiations between the University and Elsevier. We value our long-standing relationships with Cell and other Cell Press journals, which have helped make and keep these journals at the forefront of scientific publishing. These journals have in turn been of service as standard bearers of excellence to the life sciences community as a whole.

We therefore wish to express our concern at the current lack of a contract between UC and Elsevier, and the decision to deny our UC colleagues access to research published in Cell Press and other Elsevier journals. 

Pending the signing of a new contract with UC, we wish to inform you that we are suspending our editorial services to Cell Press journals. We very much hope to hear of an appropriate resolution and resume our productive relationships with Cell Press….”

UC Faculty Protest Elsevier by Suspending Work for Cell Press | The Scientist Magazine®

“Faculty members at a number University of California schools have stopped serving on the editorial boards of journals published by Cell Press in protest of its parent company, Elsevier, not having reached a dealwith UC for access to its publications. The 31 signatories of a letter to Elsevier, posted yesterday (August 7) online, write that unless Elsevier and UC can agree upon a new contract, they will not serve on the boards of Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Current Biology, and others…..

On Elsevier and the University of California – Don’t publish in these journals if you want us to read it. : labrats

“I’m currently finishing up my PhD at UC Berkeley. Our university is fighting the good fight against Elsevier. They have a partial monopoly on the academic publishing market, and I’m very supportive of the effort to negotiate the contract.

If you’ve got any option to avoid the journals on this list, you should. We can’t see it in the UC system. Additionally, if these journals felt the impact of Elsevier’s reluctance to negotiate, they may put pressure on Elsevier to move towards the UC’s position (open access support).

Here is a list of articles that we can’t read that are on the Science Direct platform:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rkCkDZp2-XUbRUq3hwU31DPtpQ4qxeYqoeYH-KGCJaA/edit?usp=sharing

Also, anything that is not open access on the Cell Press platform is out of view too.While we can go through the inter library loan process to find critical articles, it is much slower than the direct access we’ve become accustomed to….”

On Elsevier and the University of California – Don’t publish in these journals if you want us to read it. : labrats

“I’m currently finishing up my PhD at UC Berkeley. Our university is fighting the good fight against Elsevier. They have a partial monopoly on the academic publishing market, and I’m very supportive of the effort to negotiate the contract.

If you’ve got any option to avoid the journals on this list, you should. We can’t see it in the UC system. Additionally, if these journals felt the impact of Elsevier’s reluctance to negotiate, they may put pressure on Elsevier to move towards the UC’s position (open access support).

Here is a list of articles that we can’t read that are on the Science Direct platform:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rkCkDZp2-XUbRUq3hwU31DPtpQ4qxeYqoeYH-KGCJaA/edit?usp=sharing

Also, anything that is not open access on the Cell Press platform is out of view too.While we can go through the inter library loan process to find critical articles, it is much slower than the direct access we’ve become accustomed to….”

Open-Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“That may soon change. Smaller-scale efforts are mixing with top-down decisions — through universities’ subscription negotiations and a major European plan that mandates open-access publication for certain research — to put unusual pressure on publishers.

Don’t think these battles are confined to the library or an individual discipline. The changes have the potential to alter nearly everything about how research is disseminated — and therefore how departments spend money, researchers collaborate, and faculty careers advance….”

Five Reasons Why Publishing Science for Profit Will Endure

[Access may require registration.]

Big Deals Are Actually a Good Deal….

Prestige Matters….

Boycotts Are Largely Symbolic….

Preprint Archiving Is Not Universal….

Publishing Quality Science Is Difficult and Expensive….

Adopting Plan S as an individual researcher

 I have decided to adopt Plan S as an individual researcher. This means that irrespective of who funds my research, the projects I start from 2020 on will follow all 10 Plan S principles. Note that so far no cap has been decided on the price of Author Publishing Charges for gold open access, so for the time being and for coherence, I will adopt as a cap that of Scientific Reports, the full open access journal to whose editorial board I belong (which on the other hand it is very similar to one of the pioneering journals of Open Access, PLOS ONE). Furthermore, I will not do any work or have any relationship whatsoever with journals where I would not be able to publish myself: no editing, no reviewing, nothing. Why from 2020? Simply for colleagues that may want to work with me on a project to be aware of my publication policy beforehand, before they do any work, and I want to give due notice to other journals I am currently working with. Same goes for prospective Ph D students or postdocs: be aware that your career may be hampered by coming to work with me….”

In Talks With Elsevier, UCLA Reaches for a Novel Bargaining Chip: Its Faculty – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“The University of California at Los Angeles turned to an unusual bit of leverage as its system negotiates with Elsevier, the academic-publishing giant: its own faculty’s research.

In a letter on Tuesday, campus officials asked faculty members to consider declining to review articles for Elsevier journals until negotiations “are clearly moving in a productive direction.” The letter also asked professors to consider publishing research elsewhere, including in prestigious open-access journals.

The university system has said it wants to reach an agreement that would be less expensive and simplify open-access publishing. But time for negotiations is running out: The contract expires on December 31….”

La difficile transizione all’Open Access | Scienza in Rete

From Google’s English: “[A]mong the signatories of Plan S there is only one Italian institution, the INFN. The other research centers, such as the CNR or the Universities, have not yet taken a position on this matter. But how much do Italian universities spend to get access to scientific journals and what is the status of Open Access in our country? We asked the CARE Group (Coordination for Access to Electronic Resources), the organ within the Conference of Rectors of Italian Universities (CRUI) that deals, on the mandate of the universities, negotiations with scientific publishers. The level of total expenditure for subscription fee paymentsit is not known, since in addition to the centrally managed contracts by CARE, on which a confidentiality clause however, individual universities acquire autonomously a part of the resources. Regarding the penetration of OA in Italian research, CARE replies: “At the moment there are no quantitative studies on this”, adding that there are no contracts of the type read and publish  with no publisher.”