Where Does Open Science Lead Us During a Pandemic? A Public Good Argument to Prioritise Rights in The Open Commons | Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics | Cambridge Core

Abstract:  During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, open science has become central to experimental, public health and clinical responses across the globe. Open science is described as an open commons, in which a right to science avails all possible scientific data for everyone to access and use. In this common space, capitalist platforms now provide many essential services and are taking the lead in public health activities. These neoliberal businesses, however, have a central role in the capture of public goods. This paper argues that the open commons is a community of rights, consisting of people and institutions whose interests mutually support the public good. If OS is a cornerstone of public health, then reaffirming the public good is its overriding purpose, and unethical platforms ought to be excluded from the commons and its benefits.

Libraries Are Updating for Today’s Digital Needs. Congress Needs to Clear the Way. | Public Knowledge : Public Knowledge

“Many libraries have found a solution, at least when it comes to making physical books available digitally. This system is called Controlled Digital Lending (CDL). Libraries have a strong argument that fair use makes it possible to make an electronic copy of a book, and allow someone to “borrow” it, to the extent that such copying simply replicates what would have been possible with physical books under first sale. Under CDL, a digital copy of a physical book can only be read and used by one person at a time. While it is being “lent” electronically, a library engaged in CDL would take the physical book out of circulation, and only one person can “borrow” an electronic book at once. Since any of the copies made under this system necessarily cannot have an effect any different than normal lending could, libraries are on pretty solid ground that these acts of copying are fair uses.

But CDL only gets you so far. While it works with physical books, electronic materials often come with licensing and contract terms, as well as copy-prevention technology, that set highly specific conditions on how the library can lend it out. Certainly, some libraries buy special library editions of books and have various library-specific arrangements with publishers — but they don’t have to. With physical books, libraries are free to buy a book at any bookstore, or take books via donation, and lend them out freely as part of their collection. With electronic materials, libraries generally have to buy licenses for special, restricted library editions, that carry significant usage restrictions and might even expire over time or cause the files to “self-destruct” after a set number of loans.

It’s time for Congress to step in and clarify that libraries should be as free to buy and lend books today as they have been for centuries. We need legislation that ensures that libraries are free to buy ebooks and other electronic materials and lend them out, just as they can with physical media. A library should have the right to simply purchase an ebook at its mass market retail price, and then check it out to patrons one at a time. Licenses for library ebooks shouldn’t expire, and they shouldn’t carry restrictions that prevent libraries from carrying out their educational and archival missions. This legislation should also clarify that existing CDL programs for physical media are lawful, to avoid costly litigation over the fair use arguments….”

Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science – Call to Action – Google Docs

“COVID-19 is the most disruptive phenomenon of our time. The pandemic has profound medical, societal, and economical consequences. 

But one reason we have failed to react on time and prevent what has happened – is the state of science and conditions of how science is conducted.

The lack of transparency is blocking science to function efficiently and preventing many talented people from disadvantaged backgrounds from realizing their potential and making a valuable contribution to society.

Our global society misses out big time, caused by financial greed and prejudice, undermining high-quality research and advances in science to solve the world’s major problems.

The Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science is planning a path of concrete gradual changes, in order to bring more transparency and quality to science.

Please join us to make this change – or else we FAIL! …”

Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science – Call to Action – Google Docs

“COVID-19 is the most disruptive phenomenon of our time. The pandemic has profound medical, societal, and economical consequences. 

But one reason we have failed to react on time and prevent what has happened – is the state of science and conditions of how science is conducted.

The lack of transparency is blocking science to function efficiently and preventing many talented people from disadvantaged backgrounds from realizing their potential and making a valuable contribution to society.

Our global society misses out big time, caused by financial greed and prejudice, undermining high-quality research and advances in science to solve the world’s major problems.

The Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science is planning a path of concrete gradual changes, in order to bring more transparency and quality to science.

Please join us to make this change – or else we FAIL! …”

Open Letter – Our Science is in Danger and we need Your Help! (#133) · Issues · Publishing Reform / discussion · GitLab

“Our Open Letter action is now part of Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science hosted on JOGL – a platform where users can launch their projects and collaborate with others to solve problems using open science, responsible innovation, and continuous learning! They partner with academic labs, companies, startups, foundations, NGOs, and public services to create participatory research programs for understanding and solving health, environmental, social, and humanitarian issues.

And thanks to JOGL we already have our first helpers!

Please help with your feedback and ideas reviewing and improving our JOGL page, so we can make sure all your concerns are addressed….”

Open Letter – Our Science is in Danger and we need Your Help! (#133) · Issues · Publishing Reform / discussion · GitLab

“Our Open Letter action is now part of Campaign for Open & Trustworthy Science hosted on JOGL – a platform where users can launch their projects and collaborate with others to solve problems using open science, responsible innovation, and continuous learning! They partner with academic labs, companies, startups, foundations, NGOs, and public services to create participatory research programs for understanding and solving health, environmental, social, and humanitarian issues.

And thanks to JOGL we already have our first helpers!

Please help with your feedback and ideas reviewing and improving our JOGL page, so we can make sure all your concerns are addressed….”

UK Research and Development Roadmap – GOV.UK

“Research has rapidly improved our understanding of COVID-19. Supported by rapid action by funding bodies, scientists around the world have directed their efforts to this global priority, working collaboratively across countries and disciplines, and sharing findings openly and quickly. Rapid targeted funding has enabled researchers and policy makers to join up to clarify and tackle pressing questions and has enabled businesses to collaborate in new ways to address national needs. For example, the COVID-19 Genomics UK consortium has achieved rapid sequencing of over 50% of all the SARS-CoV-2 genomes in the world. The UK has led the world’s largest randomised control trial for COVID-19, with findings helping the sickest patients not only in the UK but all around the world. We should aspire to this level of openness, connectivity and pace across our whole R&D system….

Crucially, we must embrace the potential of open research practices. First, we will require that research outputs funded by the UK government are freely available to the taxpayer who funds research. Such open publication will also ensure that UK research is cited and built on all over the world. We will mandate open publication and strongly incentivise open data sharing where appropriate, so that reproducibility is enabled, and knowledge is shared and spread collaboratively. Second, we will ensure that more modern research outputs are recognised and rewarded. For example, we will ensure that digital software and datasets are properly recognised as research outputs, so that we can minimise efforts spent translating digital outputs into more traditional formats. Third, we will consider the case for new infrastructure to enable more effective sharing of knowledge between researchers and with industry to accelerate open innovation where possible….”

Covid-19 Shows Scientific Journals Like Elsevier Need to Open Up – Bloomberg

“One big change brought on by Covid-19 is that virtually all the scientific research being produced about it is free to read. Anyone can access the many preliminary findings that scholars are posting on “preprint servers.” Data are shared openly via a multitude of different channels. Scientific journals that normally keep their articles behind formidable paywalls have been making an exception for new research about the virus, as well as much (if not all) older work relevant to it.

This response to a global pandemic is heartening and may well speed that pandemic to its end. But after that, what happens with scientific communication? Will everything go back behind the journal paywalls?

 

 

Well, no. Open-access advocates in academia have been pushing for decades to make more of their work publicly available and paywall-free, and in recent years they’ve been joined by the government agencies and large foundations that fund much scientific research. Covid-19 has accelerated this shift. I’m pretty sure there’s no going back. …”