EU open-access envoy urges foundations to join Plan S

“Organisations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust should join Plan S to continue their “moral leadership” on open research, Plan S founder and European Commission open-access envoy Robert-Jan Smits told Research Europe. He was speaking on his return from a weeklong tour of federal agencies, universities and learned societies in the United States, where he was attempting to boost international support for the plan….

Smits claimed that the feedback on Plan S he received in the US was mostly that independent foundations need to join….

Smits has said that Plan S is based on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s policies. These include that papers reporting research it has funded must be made openly available immediately and with a licence that permits unrestricted reuse. The foundation has forced some of the world’s most prestigious journals to change their policies so that they comply.

During the trip, Smits sought to quell fears that Plan S would undermine the so-called green open-access model, in which papers are placed in repositories, usually after a publisher-imposed embargo period. Plan S will not accept embargo periods, causing some concern that it will only support the gold open-access model in which papers are made openly available immediately, usually by paying publishers an article-processing charge.

Smits said that Plan S leaves “ample room” for repositories, article preprints and self-archiving. He also admitted that organisations in the US flagged the plan’s lack of recognition for publishers using the so-called diamond and platinum open-access models, which do not charge authors publication fees….

According to Smits, those he met who were most enthusiastic about Plan S were librarians and researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.

More cautiously interested parties, he said, were the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Smits said this was because the OSTP is awaiting a new director who will set the agenda for open access at the federal level. Research Europe has approached these organisations for comment.

Those who were most sceptical of the plan were the learned societies, Smits said. These organisations rely on income from journal subscription charges and fear that the loss of revenue caused by a switch to open access would affect activities such as the organisation of conferences, he said….”

PUBLIC OLOA Project Plan – Google Docs

“It is well known that one major obstacle to achieving Open Access is the lack of understanding; some say it is the biggest problem of all.  Throughout the supply-chain of producing and consuming scholarly literature, many participants understand the broader objectives of Open Access but not the practical steps they can take to help increase the accessibility of scholarly works.  This is especially true of authors themselves.  The purpose of this project is to provide some examples, of what we hope will become many, of open communications that will illustrate specific steps people can take to improve and sustain the accessibility of an article or other work. …”

The ambassadors for open access standards in the global South – SciDev.Net

“Indian OA journals have submitted 2578 requests since 2014 to be included in the DOAJ; Brazil clocked in at 2,048 requests, while Indonesia ranks first with 3,662 requests.

But roughly half of the submissions get rejected, usually because of their low quality, Tom Olijhoek, editor-in-chief of the DOAJ, tells SciDev.Net….

A journal may be genuine but ill-informed about standards, or ill-equipped to meet them.

Another, more sinister explanation is that India is home to a growing number of predatory journals …”

White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation

“To respond to a changing world, policy approaches are introduced to ensure an open, responsive and diverse knowledge system. These include adopting an open science paradigm, supporting a diversity of knowledge fields, a greater focus on inter- and transdisciplinary research and the contribution of the humanities and social sciences to addressing complex societal problems….

Increasing access to public science has the potential to make the entire research system more effective, participative and productive by reducing duplication and the costs of creating, transferring and re-using data….

As part of its commitment to African STI cooperation, South Africa will also work to advance the open science agenda elsewhere on the continent and within regional frameworks. …”

UUK Open Access Coordination Group

“The UUK Open Access Coordination Group works to ensure that the activities to support the transition towards open access in the UK can be effectively coordinated, have an ongoing focus and that progress can be monitored.

The group has no formal powers, but brings funders, institutions, publishers and other stakeholders together to recognise and explore challenges, and to build and maintain a close and constructive dialogue. The Coordination Group has five core objectives: 

  • Developing and interpreting the data and evidence base on the implementation of open access in priority areas 
  • Coordinating related research and activity being undertaken by stakeholders 
  • Commissioning research to fill gaps in the evidence
  • Providing advice on policy and the direction of implementation of open access 
  • Providing advice on the coordination and development of open access infrastructure …”

African Open Science Platform

“The African Open Science Platform initiative (AOSP), funded by the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) through the National Research Foundation (NRF), and implemented and managed by the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf), is a pan-African project for Africa by Africa. Direction is provided by CODATA (ISC).

The 3-year project was launched by the then Minister of Science and Technology, Ms Naledi Pandor, in December 2016 during the Science Forum South Africa. …”

Open Pedagogy | Open Pedagogy Notebook

“In this brief introduction, we offer a pathway for engaging with the current conversations around Open Pedagogy, some ideas about its philosophical foundation, investments, and its utility, and some concrete ways that students and teachers—all of us learners—can “open” education. We hope that this chapter will inspire those of us in education to focus our critical and aspirational lenses on larger questions about the ideology embedded within our educational systems and the ways in which pedagogy impacts these systems. At the same time we hope to provide some tools and techniques to those who want to build a more empowering, collaborative, and just architecture for learning….”

We’re still failing to deliver open access and solve the serials crisis: to succeed we need a digital transformation of scholarly communication using internet-era principles. | Zenodo

“A year ago, I concluded that we had failed in our quest to make scholarship open access (OA): the race had been won by pirates like SciHub (Green, 2017). Twelve months on, how do things look?

Key points:

  • We’re still failing to deliver open access (OA): around a fifth of new articles will be born free in 2018, roughly the same as in 2017.
  • Librarians, funders and negotiators are getting tougher with publishers but offsetting, ‘Publish and Read’, deals based on APCs won’t deliver OA for all or solve the serials crisis.
  • The authors of Budapest, Bethesda and Berlin OA declarations foresaw three changes with the coming of the internet. Flipping to a barrier to publish (APCs) from a barrier to read (subscriptions) wasn’t one of them.
  • By itself, OA won’t reduce costs to solve the serials crisis: a digital transformation of scholarly communications based on internet-era principles is needed. 
  • Following the internet-era principle of ‘fail-fast’, what if papers are first posted as preprints and only if they succeed in gaining attention will editors invite submission to their journalIn clinging onto traditional journals to advance the careers of the few (authors), OA is delayed for the many (readers): rebuilding the reputation economy to accept preprints could be the catalyst to deliver OA, solve the serials crisis and drive out predatory journals

Author’s Note In keeping with the proposition in this paper, and following the advice of Pippa Smart, Editor of Learned Publishing who saw an early draft, I’m releasing it first as a preprint to test if it ‘fails fast’ or not. I will do my best to promote it so that it gains an audience and I invite readers to comment, propose improvements and point out where I’ve gone wrong. I also invite journal editors to consider whether it has ‘succeeded’ and if in their opinion it has I look forward to being asked to submit it for peer review and formal publication in due course.

Forum for Open Access in South Asia – Taking forward Open Access movement in South Asia

“Forum for Open Access in South Asia is formed by the advocates of Open Access, Open Data and Open Education in South Asian countries to take forward the Open Access movement in South Asia. Those who have interests in the Open Access movement may join the Facebook group to get involved in the discussions or follow the Facebook page to get updates….”