OpenAIRE – OpenAIRE

“OpenAIRE aims to support the implementation of Open Access in Europe. It provides the means to promote  and realize the widespread adoption of the Open Access Policy, as set out by the ERC Scientific Council Guidelines for Open Access and the Open Access pilot launched by the European Commission.

OpenAIRE, a three-year project, will establish the infrastructure for researchers to support them in complying with the EC OA pilot and the ERC Guidelines on Open Access. It will provide an extensive  European Helpdesk System, based on a distributed network of national and regional liaison offices in 27 countries, to ensure localized help to researchers within their own context. It will build an OpenAIRE portal and e-Infrastructure for the repository networks and explore scientific data management services together with 5 disciplinary communities. It will also provide a repository facility for researchers who do not have access to an institutional or discipline-specific repository….”

Early career researchers want Open Science | Genome Biology | Full Text

“Open Science is encouraged by the European Union and many other political and scientific institutions. However, scientific practice is proving slow to change. We propose, as early career researchers, that it is our task to change scientific research into open scientific research and commit to Open Science principles.”

Peter Suber, Half a dozen reasons why I support the Jussieu Call for Open Science and Bibl…

“1. I support its call to move beyond PDFs. This is necessary to bypass publisher locks and facilitate reuse, text mining, access by the visually impaired, and access in bandwidth-poor parts of the world. 

2. I applaud its recognition of no-fee or no-APC open-access journals, their existence, their value, and the fact that a significant number of authors will always depend on them. 

3. I join its call for redirecting funds now spent on subscription journals to support OA alternatives. 

4. I endorse its call to reform methods of research evaluation. If we want to assess quality, we must stop assuming that impact and prestige are good proxies for quality. If we want to assess impact, we must stop using metrics that measure it badly and create perverse incentives to put prestige ahead of both quality and access.

5. I support its call for infrastructures that are proof against privatization. No matter how good proprietary and closed-source platforms may initially be, they are subject to acquisition and harmful mutation beyond the control of the non-profit academic world. Even without acquisition, their commitment to OA is contingent on the market, and they carry a permanent risk of trapping rather than liberating knowledge. The research community cannot afford to entrust its research to platforms carrying that risk. 

6. Finally I support what it terms bibliodiversity. While we must steer clear of closed-source infrastructure, subject to privatization and enclosure, we must also steer clear of platform monocultures, subject to rigidity, stagnation, and breakage. Again, no matter how good a monoculture platform may initially be, in the long run it cannot be better than an ecosystem of free and open-source, interoperable components, compliant with open standards, offering robustness, modularity, flexibility, freedom to create better modules without rewriting the whole system, freedom to pick modules that best meet local needs, and freedom to scale up to meet global needs without first overcoming centralized constraints or unresponsive decision-makers. …”

Open Folklore

“A partnership of the American Folklore Society and the Indiana University Libraries, Open Folklore is a scholarly resource devoted to increasing the number and variety of open access resources, published and unpublished, that are available for the field of folklore studies and the communities with whom folklore scholars partner….”

Open Access Books: Open Access in order to…? – SpringerOpen blog

“This week is Open Access Week, a global event that encourages the discussion of open access (OA) amongst researchers and the scholarly community. This year’s theme for OA Week asks the question, ‘Open access in order to…?’ Whilst OA is more established for journal publishing, it is still relatively new for academic books. So, from a publisher’s perspective, why does Springer Nature offer an OA option for book authors? We have been publishing OA books and chapters under our SpringerOpen and Palgrave Macmillan imprints since 2011 and just this week published our 400th OA book. We asked some of our OA books team and editors about what OA means to them.”

Radical Open Access – Building Horizontal Alliances

“ABOUT THE COLLECTIVE

Formed in 2015, the Radical Open Access Collective is a community of scholar-led, not-for-profit presses, journals and other open access projects. Now consisting of over twenty members, we promote a progressive vision for open publishing in the humanities and social sciences. What we have in common is an understanding of open access as being characterised by a spirit of ongoing creative experimentation. We also share a willingness to subject some of our most established scholarly communication practices to creative critique, together with the institutions that sustain them (the university, the library, the publishing house and so on). The collective thus offers a radical ‘alternative’ to the conservative versions of open access that are currently being put forward by commercially-oriented presses, funders and policy makers….”

The Open Access Tracking Project: an Intro with Peter Suber | Eventbrite

“Join ASIS&T for an introduction to the Open Access Tracking Project by Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Open Access Project and the Harvard Office of Scholarly Communication. Suber will be presenting his Open Access Tracking project and looking for students to provide future assistance. Come hangout with other LIS students and learn about an exciting new opportunity. Light refreshments will be provided.”