OSF | Public Access Submission System (PASS)

“The Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, the Center for Open Science, MIT Libraries and the Harvard University Office for Scholarly Communication are building the Public Access Submission System (PASS), an open platform that would support researchers’ workflows related to compliance with funding agencies’ public access policies. The main ideas for this project arose based on discussions between Harvard, MIT and COS over the last two years….

While many federal agencies require research results to be made publicly accessible, the processes and requirements to do so vary greatly from one agency to another. The heterogeneous processes and requirements have become burdensome for researchers and their institutions, resulting in lower rates of compliances or compliance efficacies. Federal agencies, however, are not in a position to develop and commit to a solution, which would harmonize these workflows.

On the university side, many researchers are subject to more than one OA policy, for example, a university policy and a funder policy. Similarly, in the case of researches with multiple funding sources, researchers are subjects to public access policies from different funders. Universities would face an implementation nightmare, if the only paths to compliance were the different submission interfaces at different funders and institutions,. A unified submission interface would lighten the load on universities, and improve compliance, even if the unified submission interface were not exclusive….”

AI experts call for support of STEM education, research and open data policies at House hearing | CIO Dive

“The industry and government have spent many years collecting data, and now there is finally a tool [AI] to derive insight from it. The panel [at a House Oversight and Government Reform committee hearing Wednesday] agreed that open data policies are needed so the industry can begin making use of it, but it won’t be an easy process. Most of the government’s data is still unstructured and needs to be organized in a meaningful way.”

Hard truths behind the fight to run government like a business – Inkstick

“Beyond program performance, the Obama Administration also embraced the non-government benefits offered by the data at the government’s disposal as a service to American citizens and the commercial sector. Through powerful policy statements like the Open Data Executive Order and Open Data Policy, the creation of data.gov, the ongoing open-source efforts of Project Open Data, and its eventual embrace of the DATA Act, the previous Administration demonstrated its belief in the emergent saying, “data is the new oil.” The Administration offered publicly available data to improve the public’s oversight of the government and to be harnessed by businesses and individuals who could find an innovative purpose for it. The Evidence-Based Policymaking Act would build on that by including the main components of the OPEN Government Data Act, which seeks to cement the government’s ongoing open data efforts into law while providing much-needed technology and training for the federal workforce to grow these efforts – investing in the government’s human capital the way businesses have for decades….Evidence-based policymaking that relies on facts and data is critical to oversight and effectiveness – but policy based on emotions and politics all too often drives this generation of political leaders, to the detriment of our governance and our shared security.”

Position Available: Right to Research Coalition Advocacy Fellow – SPARC

“The Right to Research Coalition (R2RC) is seeking a Fellow who is ready and willing to contribute to its advocacy and policy work. The R2RC is a coalition of organizations representing millions of students around the world focused on the belief that no student should be denied access to articles they need because their institution cannot afford the cost of access. The R2RC is project of SPARC.

This is an opportunity for an early career academic professional to expand their repertoire of skills while contributing to important advocacy efforts on issues you care deeply about. This Fellow will receive regular, thorough briefings on the latest open access policy developments, and will be trained and supported by SPARC’s experienced advocacy team members.

Responsibilities

• Ensure that current coalition members are kept up-to-date on all relevant policy action.

• Engage with policymakers on behalf of the R2RC in an effort to educate them on the issue of open access and why this issue is of great importance to the research community.

• Update resources, materials, and website to reflect ongoing policy changes.

• Work with SPARC’s advocacy team on social media and other communication efforts.”

Digitising archives, sharing knowledge | Interview | Nepali Times

“The South Asia Materials Project is now digitising as the means of preservation, and many of the resources are being made available online. Further, the newly formed South Asia Open Archives initiative is laying plans for massive efforts to digitise and make available important cultural resources for open access.”

Caselaw Access Project | Library Innovation Lab

“The Caselaw Access Project is making all U.S. case law freely accessible online.

Our common law – the written decisions issued by our state and federal courts – is not freely accessible online. This lack of access harms justice and equality and stifles innovation in legal services.

The Harvard Law School Library has one of the world’s largest, most comprehensive collections of court decisions in print form. Our collection totals over 42,000 volumes and roughly 40 million pages. Caselaw Access Project aims to transform the official print versions of these court decisions into digital files made freely accessible online….”

Unlock public access to research on software safety through DMCA and CFAA reform | We the People: Your Voice in Our Government

“Software now runs consumer products and critical systems that we trust with our safety and security. For example, cars, medical devices, voting machines, power grids, weapons systems, and stock markets all rely on code. While responsible companies cooperate with the technical community and the public to improve the safety of code, others do not. They instead try to prevent researchers and others from sharing safety research, threatening criminal and civil actions under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Chilling research puts us all at risk. Protect the public from unsafe code and help us to protect ourselves. Reform the DMCA and CFAA to unlock and encourage research about potentially dangerous safety and security weaknesses in software….”

PubMed Commons to be Discontinued | NCBI Insights

PubMed Commons has been a valuable experiment in supporting discussion of published scientific literature. The service was first introduced as a pilot project in the fall of 2013 and was reviewed in 2015. Despite low levels of use at that time, NIH decided to extend the effort for another year or two in hopes that participation would increase. Unfortunately, usage has remained minimal, with comments submitted on only 6,000 of the 28 million articles indexed in PubMed. While many worthwhile comments were made through the service during its 4 years of operation, NIH has decided that the low level of participation does not warrant continued investment in the project, particularly given the availability of other commenting venues.

UConnPIRG works toward affordable textbooks and access codes — The Daily Campus

“Student activist group UConnPIRG will increase their efforts this semester in their “Action Plan for Affordable Textbooks” campaign, which advocates for affordable class materials like open educational resources, by engaging with professors and the greater University of Connecticut community.”

RFP: Review OER in Your Discipline –CUNY Teaching and Learning Center

“The Teaching and Learning Center and the Graduate Center Library invite individual or group proposals from CUNY Graduate Center students for literature reviews of OER in specific disciplines. We will pay $1000 per discipline, and can fund up to five distinct projects in the Spring 2018 semester.

Each project will result in a report of 1000-2000 words that evaluates Open Educational Resources in a specific discipline with attention to breadth and depth of coverage, inclusiveness of emergent voices and arguments, and appropriateness for deployment in an undergraduate classroom. Funded projects will be developed with support from staff at the Teaching and Learning Center and Graduate Center Library, and grantees will be expected to attend up to three meetings during the Spring semester to report on their progress. Final reports will be due June 1, 2018, and will be published in Summer 2018 on Visible Pedagogy.  

To apply, submit a single PDF by email to tlc@gc.cuny.edu by midnight on February 12, 2018….”