Pruitt Pushes For Transparency In Science | The Daily Caller

“Pruitt will reverse long-standing EPA policy allowing regulators to rely on non-public scientific data in crafting rules….EPA regulators would only be allowed to consider scientific studies that make their data available for public scrutiny under Pruitt’s new policy. Also, EPA-funded studies would need to make all their data public.”

Green digitization: Botanical collections data answer real-world questions | EurekAlert! Science News

“Special issue of Applications in Plant Sciences explores new developments and applications of digital plant data

Even as botany has moved firmly into the era of “big data,” some of the most valuable botanical information remains inaccessible for computational analysis, locked in physical form in the orderly stacks of herbaria and museums. Herbarium specimens are plant samples collected from the field that are dried and stored with labels describing species, date and location of collection, along with various other information including habitat descriptions. The detailed historical record these specimens keep of species occurrence, morphology, and even DNA provides an unparalleled data source to address a variety of morphological, ecological, phenological, and taxonomic questions. Now efforts are underway to digitize these data, and make them easily accessible for analysis. Two symposia were convened to discuss the possibilities and promise of digitizing these data–at the Botanical Society of America’s 2017 annual meeting in Fort Worth, Texas, and again at the XIX International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China. The proceedings of those symposia have been published as a special issue of Applications in Plant Sciences; the articles discuss a range of methods and remaining challenges for extracting data from botanical collections, as well as applications for collections data once digitized. Many of the authors contributing to the issue are involved in iDigBio (Integrated Digitized Biocollections), a new “national coordinating center for the facilitation and mobilization of biodiversity specimen data,” as described by Dr. Gil Nelson, a botanist at Florida State University and coeditor of this issue….”

Mellon Foundation Grant to Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library Will Catalyze New Scholarship on American Women’s Suffrage and the Still-Unrealized Promise of Female Citizenship | Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University

“The Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study has received a grant of $870,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will support fellowships and public programming centered on the 2020 centennial of the 19th Amendment at the Schlesinger Library and the broader Radcliffe Institute….

The Project will also create an open-access digital portal to facilitate interdisciplinary, transnational scholarship and innovative teaching on newly digitized Schlesinger Library collections along with historical databases tracking voting patterns….”

Poynder On Point: Ten Years After

“The open access (OA) movement has had some big wins this year: In July [2004], a cross-party group of British politicians called on the U.K. government to make all publicly funded research accessible to everyone “free of charge, online.” That same month, the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations recommended that all NIH-funded research be made freely available 6 months after publication. But where did the OA movement come from, and where is it taking us? …”

SUNY Board of Trustees Open Access Resolution | University Libraries

“On March 22, 2018, the SUNY Board of Trustees passed an Open Access Policy and System Repository Resolution put forward by Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson.

The resolution instructs all SUNY campuses to adopt “an open access policy that recognizes each campus’s unique mission and culture by no later than March 31, 2020”.

On February 6, 2017, Stony Brook University became the first SUNY campus to adopt an open access policy. The SBU Open Access Policy leverages Green Open Access, allowing SBU authors to retain their copyright, publish in the journals of their choice, and share their final peer-reviewed article drafts in an open access repository….”

The Quiet Revolution | University of Delaware Research | Trevor A. Dawes, the May Morris Librarian and vice provost for libraries and museums at the University of Delaware

“Trevor A. Dawes learned how libraries can change people’s lives when he was a college student. Now, he’s leading the charge to make the UD Library, Museums and Press an even greater force for good.  

Q. What led you to a career at the library? A. I never considered librarianship as a profession until I got a job working in the library as a work-study student at Columbia University. I had great mentors there who recognized my passion. James Neal, president of the American Library Association, is one of those mentors I still have today. David Roselle, president emeritus of UD and a former member of the OCLC board, also has been a great friend and supporter….”

Trends, challenges and opportunities for LIS education: an interview with Carol Tenopir | Library Connect

“[Q] How will open science influence LIS education?

 
[A] LIS education needs to address how open science issues, including open access and open data, affect scholarship, scholars and, ultimately, science and society. For example, there is the human side that involves helping researchers learn about and participate in the process, while recognizing their concerns. Librarians also need the technical skills to provide metadata services, manage institutional repositories and assist with research data management to further the open science practices at their institutions. Researchers are faced with funding and governmental regulations requiring deposition of data and articles in repositories. Information science professionals can help this happen by providing either repositories or links to repositories and helping researchers with the processes needed to deposit. Preservation is an important part of this as well. And the need for education about high-quality sources never goes away.”

 

OA policy from US Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) (April 2014)

“Wide dissemination of the results of IMLS-funded projects advances the body of knowledge and professional practice in museum, library, and information services. For this reason, IMLS encourages creators of works resulting from IMLS funding to share their work whenever possible through forums such as institutional or disciplinary repositories, open-access journals, or other media. All work products resulting from IMLS funding should be distributed for free or at cost unless IMLS has given you written approval for another arrangement. IMLS expects you to ensure that final peer-reviewed manuscripts resulting from research conducted under an award are made available in a manner that permits the public to access, read, download, and analyze the work without charge…. If you collect and analyze data as part of an IMLS funded project, IMLS expects you to deposit data resulting from IMLS-funded research in a broadly accessible repository that allows the public to use the data without charge no later than the date upon which you submit your final 13 report to IMLS. You should deposit the data in a machine-readable, non-proprietary digital format to maximize search, retrieval, and analysis….”

ImmPort Home

“ImmPort is funded by the NIH, NIAID and DAIT in support of the NIH mission to share data with the public. Data shared through ImmPort has been provided by NIH-funded programs, other research organizations and individual scientists ensuring these discoveries will be the foundation of future research….

The Immunology Database and Analysis Portal (ImmPort) has been developed under the ImmPort Contract by the Northrop Grumman Information Technology Health Solutions team for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation (DAIT).

ImmPort is a partnership between researchers at the University of California-San Francisco, Stanford University, the University of Buffalo, the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and Northrop Grumman.

The goals of the ImmPort project are to:

  • Provide an open access platform for research data sharing
  • Create an integrated environment that broadens the usefulness of scientific data and advances hypothesis-driven and hypothesis-generating research
  • Accelerate scientific discovery while extending the value of scientific data in all areas of immunological research
  • Promote rapid availability of important findings, making new discoveries available to the research community for further analysis and interpretation
  • Provide analysis tools to advance research in basic and clinical immunology…

Private data and pre-release data are stored in private workspaces of investigators at the ImmPort site located at NIAID….”

The New Government Omnibus Spending Bill Shows That Science Advocacy Matters

“Congress will now be required to post Congressional Research Service reports (reports on policy issues that are completed by Congress’s research arm) on the Internet. This will mean better public access to nonpartisan, taxpayer-funded research and ensure transparency, something UCS has long been advocating for….”