MIT Press to develop a sustainable framework for open access monographs

The MIT Press has received a three-year $850,000 grant from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, to perform a broad-based monograph publishing cost analysis and to develop and openly disseminate a durable financial framework and business plan for open-access (OA) monographs. The press, a leader in OA publishing for almost 25 years, will also undertake a pilot program to implement the resulting framework for scholarly front- and backlist titles.

The Executive Branch Must Stop Suppressing Science – Scientific American Blog Network

“For much of my time in public service, there were some things government officials did just because they were the right things to do—and that included respecting the research done by government scientists. That respect has faded over recent presidencies. Sharpie-gate may have been its death knell. …

Earlier this year, General Robert Neller, then commandant of the Marine Corps, wrote to the Secretary of the Navy about the damage from storms: “The combat readiness of II Marine Expeditionary Force—1/3 the combat power of the Marine Corps—is degraded and will continue to degrade,” he asserted. We have to be better prepared for the impacts of climate change. But that goal will be impossible if political officials act in bad faith by distorting or suppressing government research on climate science….

 

To help rebuild ethics, integrity and trust in government—including trust in its research and data—I joined a nonpartisan task force of former government officials concerned about the executive branch’s growing disregard for norms and unwritten rules that had formerly kept its power in check. Recently,our group, the National Task Force on Rule of Law & Democracy—a project of the Brennan Center for Justice—published a report proposing legislation that would effectively respond to the numerous instances we catalogued of federal officials censoring scientific information, changing scientific findings to suit political agendas and retaliating against government scientists because their research was politically inconvenient….”

Scholarly Communications and Copyright Librarian (K-State Libraries)

“Kansas State University Libraries invite applications and nominations for a creative, collaborative, and service-minded individual to join our Center for the Advancement of Digital Scholarship (CADS) as Scholarly Communication and Copyright Librarian. The individual in this position will have a primary focus of leading, educating, and providing outreach for copyright services, open access, and K-State’s Open/Alternative Textbook Initiative, and will help support the Center’s other services. This position reports to the CADS team lead in the Academic Services Department.

Following a May 22, 2018 fire in Hale Library, the university’s main library, the administration, faculty and staff, who had been looking forward to the creation of a first-floor learning commons, have instead reimagined the entire library from the ground up. Vital to the future of K-State Libraries will be strengthened scholarly communication and copyright services.

This is a full-time tenure-track academic appointment carrying full faculty status and responsibilities.  The candidate must have a commitment to scholarly/creative activities and professional service necessary for pursuing tenure at Kansas State University Libraries….”

New NIH-funded translational research centers to speed, diversify Alzheimer’s drug discovery | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“The Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer’s Disease (AMP-AD) program’s open-science enterprise, which has provided more than 500 new candidate targets for Alzheimer’s disease, served as the foundation for the new centers.

“Through these centers, NIH will expand the use of open-science and open-source principles to de-risk novel drug targets with the goal of facilitating the development of new treatments for Alzheimer’s,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D….”

New NIH-funded translational research centers to speed, diversify Alzheimer’s drug discovery | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“The Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer’s Disease (AMP-AD) program’s open-science enterprise, which has provided more than 500 new candidate targets for Alzheimer’s disease, served as the foundation for the new centers.

“Through these centers, NIH will expand the use of open-science and open-source principles to de-risk novel drug targets with the goal of facilitating the development of new treatments for Alzheimer’s,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D….”

Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data | Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress announced today that it has been awarded a $1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) project, which will pilot ways to combine cutting edge technology and the collections of the largest library in the world, to support digital research at scale….

Since 1993, the Library of Congress has invested heavily in digitizing collections and making them available online for everyone to use.  Today, the Library’s digital collections comprise a treasure trove of data whose research potential is only beginning to be realized. LC Labs — the Library’s digital innovation team — is now looking forward to how the Library, and other cultural heritage institutions, can free huge digital collections for modern computational research. …”

 

Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data | Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress announced today that it has been awarded a $1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) project, which will pilot ways to combine cutting edge technology and the collections of the largest library in the world, to support digital research at scale….

Since 1993, the Library of Congress has invested heavily in digitizing collections and making them available online for everyone to use.  Today, the Library’s digital collections comprise a treasure trove of data whose research potential is only beginning to be realized. LC Labs — the Library’s digital innovation team — is now looking forward to how the Library, and other cultural heritage institutions, can free huge digital collections for modern computational research. …”

 

SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to release our 2018-2019 Connect OER Annual Report, which offers insights about OER activities across North America. This year’s report examines the current state of OER activities featuring data from 132 institutions in the U.S. and Canada. Our intent is that these insights will help inform SPARC members, open education advocates, and the library community about current trends, best practices, and the collective impact being achieved through OER at participating institutions….”

Free the Law – Amicus Brief in Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org

“In 2013, Public.Resource.Org (PRO), a non-profit corporation based in California, purchased, scanned, and posted the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA).  The OCGA is the one and only official law of the State of Georgia, but the state objected strongly, maintaining that the only party who could make the OCGA available was their single, designated commercial vendor.  According to the State of Georgia, any other use–including PRO’s public dissemination of the law–is a copyright violation.

The State of Georgia sued Public Resource in the U.S. District Court and received judgement in their favor including a federal injunction prohibiting any and all dissemination of the code.  PRO appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and won a 3-0 victory, reversing the decision of the court below.

The State of Georgia appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Public Resource responded, maintaining that the State of Georgia has the law and the facts wrong, but nevertheless, the matter should be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court.

We prepared a amicus brief on behalf of 119 law students, 54 solo and small-firm practitioners of aw, and 21 legal educators in support of Public.Resource.Org, arguing that the Supreme Court should take the case to ensure that we have free access to all of the law nationwide, and not just to Georgia’s law.

The Supreme Court has since agreed to take the case….”