Open Access Data Analyst

“The University of California Libraries and the California Digital Library (CDL) are at the center of a broad strategy to transition UC’s multi-million dollar journal license expenditures to open access publishing through negotiated transformative agreements with scholarly publishers. The development and adoption of new open access publishing models requires CDL to expand its current capacity to include additional focus on strategic planning, workflow development and implementation, and tracking and assessment. CDL is also committed to partnering with other North American academic institutions, offering expertise and direct support in an effort to accelerate the global transition to open access.

The Open Access Data analyst will join a highly team-based environment within CDL’s Collection Development and Management Program, supporting the transition to open access publishing by engaging in complex data analysis projects, gathering data from a variety of sources and synthesizing it into outputs offering insights and predictive models to help guide strategy and inform discussions with publishers. The Open Access Data Analyst will support work both within the UC system and with other partner institutions, creating reports and visualizations which can communicate results to technical and nontechnical stakeholders throughout the library and university administration. A successful candidate will be able to embed data analysis into the transformative agreement negotiation and implementation processes, producing meaningful results to guide strategy and constantly iterating based on feedback and changing priorities to be responsive and sensitive to a dynamic environment.

The California Digital Library is a collaborative effort of the ten campuses of the University of California. As a UC systemwide library, CDL provides services to and on behalf of the UC system in partnership with the UC campus libraries. The CDL is a unit within the UC Office of the President, has a staff of 70+ and is located in downtown Oakland.

This position is a three-year contract appointment and includes the same generous employee benefits afforded UC career employees. Applicants from outside the Bay Area who wish to work remotely will be considered….”

Open Access Publisher Agreements Manager

“The University of California Libraries and the California Digital Library (CDL) are at the center of a broad strategy to transition UC’s multi-million dollar journal license expenditures to open access publishing through negotiated transformative agreements with scholarly publishers. The development and adoption of new open access publishing models requires CDL to expand its current capacity to include additional focus on strategic planning and workflow development, implementation and assessment. CDL is also committed to partnering with other North American academic institutions, offering expertise and direct support in an effort to accelerate the global transition to open access.

Reporting to the CDL Associate Executive Director / Director, Collection & Development Management, the Open Access Publisher Agreements Manager will work in the midst of this exciting and evolving space, supporting the open access publishing activities of the UC academic community, particularly as they relate to evolving transformative agreements with scholarly publishers. Leveraging deep familiarity with academic publishing, the successful candidate will develop new business workflows and mechanisms that implement and operationalize transformative publishing agreements between the University of California Libraries and multiple academic publishers. In this capacity, a priority of the position will be to provide support to UC authors and campus librarians in guiding author interactions and outreach activities across the campuses to ensure a positive author experience, and to coordinate CDL’s responsiveness to their needs and concerns. The incumbent will also work directly with publishers in implementing cost-allocation and payment mechanisms and monitoring compliance with open access terms. This position is a three-year contract appointment and includes the same generous employee benefits afforded UC career employees. Applicants from outside the Bay Area who wish to work remotely will be considered….”

Southeastern Resource Sharing and Scholarly Communication Conference

“Meet colleagues from across the Southeast and discuss ways to strengthen regional resource sharing and scholarly communication in all its aspects and among all types of libraries. We’ll cover interlibrary loan, document delivery, copyright, open access and education, consortial borrowing, regional and institutional repositories, shared collections, digital publishing, and more. Sessions will include presentations, panel discussions, lightning talks, posters, and consortia meetings. Mix and mingle with your neighbors and frequent resource sharing and scholarly communication partners while enjoying our classic southern hospitality.”

Justices debate allowing state law to be “hidden behind a pay wall” | Ars Technica

“The courts have long held that laws can’t be copyrighted. But if the state mixes the text of the law together with supporting information, things get trickier. In Monday oral arguments, the US Supreme Court wrestled with the copyright status of Georgia’s official legal code, which includes annotations written by LexisNexis.

The defendant in the case is Public.Resource.Org (PRO), a non-profit organization that publishes public-domain legal materials. The group obtained Georgia’s official version of state law, known as the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, and published the code on its website. The state of Georgia sued, arguing that while the law itself is in the public domain, the accompanying annotations are copyrighted works that can’t be published by anyone except LexisNexis.

Georgia won at the trial court level, but PRO won at the appeals court level. On Monday, the case reached the US Supreme Court.

During Monday’s oral argument, some justices seemed skeptical of Georgia’s position.

“Why would we allow the official law to be hidden behind a pay wall?” asked Justice Neil Gorsuch.

Georgia’s lawyer countered that the law wasn’t hidden behind a paywall—at least not the legally binding parts. LexisNexis offers a free version of Georgia’s code, sans annotations, on its website.

But that version isn’t the official code. LexisNexis’ terms of service explicitly warns users that it might be inaccurate. The company also prohibits users from scraping the site’s content. If you want to own the latest official version of the state code, you have to pay LexisNexis hundreds of dollars. And if you want to publish your own copy of Georgia’s official code, you’re out of luck….”

Publishing Systems Developer

“The California Digital Library (CDL) is a collaborative effort of the ten campuses of the University of California. As a UC systemwide library, CDL provides services to and on behalf of the UC system in partnership with the UC campus libraries. As a globally-connected digital library, CDL occupies a unique position between the local UC campuses and the global digital library infrastructure. The primary user base for CDL services and programs includes UC faculty, students, and library staff. The CDL is a unit within the UC Office of the President, has a staff of 70+ and is located in downtown Oakland.

The CDL’s Publishing & Special Collections group develops and maintains production services that enable robust access to unique digital assets from the University of California (UC) and beyond. Through the development of advanced technologies and creative partnerships, we provide the UC scholarly community with innovative open access publication and distribution opportunities and aggregate world-class digital collections from libraries, archives, and museums throughout the State of California, serving an array of end users including researchers, scholars, students, and the general public.

Reporting to the senior Product Manager, Publishing, the Publishing Systems Developer will work collaboratively with senior developers as well as product and service managers to build and maintain innovative open access (and mostly open source) scholarly publishing infrastructure. Key among these platforms are eScholarship (UC’s open access publishing and institutional repository platform) and integrated submission management systems used by researchers and editors to produce and publish original academic journals and to make previously published works available to the world. The incumbent will contribute to all of these platforms and projects by developing new features, responding to bug reports, and managing regular maintenance. This position will also work collaboratively on new iterations of existing platforms, as well as evaluation and implementation of new open source solutions. The Publishing Systems Developer will also have ample opportunity to build connections between platforms and to participate in both intra- and cross-team pair programming projects.

CDL welcomes and encourages diversity and seeks applications and nominations from individuals from underrepresented groups. CDL seeks to recruit and retain a diverse workforce as a reflection of our commitment to serve the people of California, to maintain the excellence of the University of California, and to offer our students richly varied disciplines, perspectives, and ways of knowing and learning.  …”

Georgia v. PublicResource.Org: Copyright Case Before the Supreme Court | Authors Alliance

“The Code Revision Commission (the “Commission”), an arm of the State of Georgia’s General Assembly, is mandated to ensure publication of the statutes adopted by the General Assembly. It does so by contracting with the LexisNexis Group (“Lexis”) to maintain, publish, and distribute the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (“OCGA”), an annotated compilation of Georgia’s statutes. Following guidelines provided by the Commission, Lexis prepares and sells OCGA, which includes the statutory text of Georgia’s laws and annotations (such as summaries of judicial decisions interpreting or applying particular statutes). Lexis also makes unannotated versions of the statutes available online.

Public.Resource.Org (“PRO”) is a non-profit organization that promotes access to government records and primary legal materials. PRO makes government documents available online, including the official codes and other rules, regulations, and standards legally adopted by federal, state, and local authorities, giving the public free access to these documents. PRO purchased printed copies of the OCGA, digitized its content, and posted copies online through its own website.

Georgia filed suit against PRO claiming copyright infringement. Before the lower courts, PRO invoked the judicially-created “government edicts” doctrine. As a matter of public policy, courts have held that government edicts having the force of law, such as statutes and judicial decisions, are not eligible for copyright protection. While the court of first instance agreed with the State of Georgia and the OCGA was found to be copyrightable, on appeal the Eleventh Circuit held that under the government edicts doctrine, OCGA is not copyrightable and rejected Georgia’s infringement claim against PRO. Now, the issue before the Supreme Court is whether Georgia can claim copyrights over the OCGA annotations or if it is prevented from doing so because the annotations are an edict of government….”

Georgia v. PublicResource.Org: Copyright Case Before the Supreme Court | Authors Alliance

“The Code Revision Commission (the “Commission”), an arm of the State of Georgia’s General Assembly, is mandated to ensure publication of the statutes adopted by the General Assembly. It does so by contracting with the LexisNexis Group (“Lexis”) to maintain, publish, and distribute the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (“OCGA”), an annotated compilation of Georgia’s statutes. Following guidelines provided by the Commission, Lexis prepares and sells OCGA, which includes the statutory text of Georgia’s laws and annotations (such as summaries of judicial decisions interpreting or applying particular statutes). Lexis also makes unannotated versions of the statutes available online.

Public.Resource.Org (“PRO”) is a non-profit organization that promotes access to government records and primary legal materials. PRO makes government documents available online, including the official codes and other rules, regulations, and standards legally adopted by federal, state, and local authorities, giving the public free access to these documents. PRO purchased printed copies of the OCGA, digitized its content, and posted copies online through its own website.

Georgia filed suit against PRO claiming copyright infringement. Before the lower courts, PRO invoked the judicially-created “government edicts” doctrine. As a matter of public policy, courts have held that government edicts having the force of law, such as statutes and judicial decisions, are not eligible for copyright protection. While the court of first instance agreed with the State of Georgia and the OCGA was found to be copyrightable, on appeal the Eleventh Circuit held that under the government edicts doctrine, OCGA is not copyrightable and rejected Georgia’s infringement claim against PRO. Now, the issue before the Supreme Court is whether Georgia can claim copyrights over the OCGA annotations or if it is prevented from doing so because the annotations are an edict of government….”

Supreme Court to decide if Georgia code is free to the public

“On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court will take up that question as the justices consider whether the annotated version of Georgia code is protected under copyright law or should be made available to the public free of charge.

The hotly disputed case, pitting the state against an open records proponent, has caught the attention of the Trump administration, whose lawyers say Georgia’s code should be protected. At the same time, news media and civil rights organizations are also weighing in, contending the public should have unhindered access to the state code….”

US GAO Recommends Actions to Improve Public Access to Research Results – Association of Research Libraries

“The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released its study, Additional Actions Needed to Improve Public Access to Research Results. The report examines the extent of US agencies’ progress implementing plans to increase public access to federally funded research results (both publications and data), per the 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memo directing the development of such plans. The report contains a review of progress across 16 agencies, and issues 37 recommendations for executive action at both the individual agency and interagency level, in such areas as repository development or guidance, requirements for data management plans (DMPs), and compliance checking.

Next month, at the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) “Implementing Effective Data Practices” conference, participants—research officers, librarians, tool-builders, and others in the research community—will hear from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Energy (DOE), and private funding agencies on these issues, including data management plans, repositories, and compliance. ARL is committed to working with the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) on recommendations for intra-institutional workflows and guidelines, and to partnering with the agencies to make publicly funded research outputs findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable….”

Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data | Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress has been awarded a $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) project, which will pilot ways to combine cutting edge technology and the collections of the largest library in the world, to support digital research at scale. …”