In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free | Science | AAAS

“The long-standing debate over open access to research results has been marked by a geographic divide. In Europe, some public funders have launched a high-profile open-access initiative, dubbed Plan S, that would ultimately require grantees to publish only in journals that immediately make papers free to all. But in the United States, federal agencies have stuck to a decade-old policy that allows grantees to publish in journals that keep papers behind a paywall for up to 1 year. Now, the divide is starting to blur, with one prominent U.S. research program starting to require immediate open access to the peer-reviewed publications it funds.

The policy is part of the Cancer Moonshot program at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, the 7-year, $1.8 billion research initiative spearheaded in 2016 by then–Vice President Joe Biden after his son Beau died of brain cancer. Biden felt that broader data sharing would speed cancer research, and after hearing from open-access advocates he backed the concept for all cancer research papers. In a 2016 speech, Biden told the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR): “Imagine if… we said we will no longer conceal cancer’s secrets in… paywalled journals with restricted databases, and instead make all that we know open to everyone so that the world can join the global campaign to end cancer in our lifetimes?”

NCI officials embraced that idea, and drafted rules that require moonshot grantees to submit a plan for making their publications “immediately and broadly available to the public.”…

That is a big change from the current policy at the National Institutes of Health, NCI’s parent agency. NIH requires only that final papers be available through NIH’s full-text PubMedCentral site within 12 months of publication—a delay that publishers cherish, saying that it safeguards subscription revenues and keeps journals viable….

Singer says that, for now, NCI won’t expand the moonshot’s open-access requirement to other programs run by the $5.7 billion institute. “We consider this a pilot program and depending on [its] success … we’ll determine the next steps,” she says. But Heather Joseph, executive director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition in Washington, D.C., hopes the agency will go further….”

Collections Strategist for Repository Services – Cambridge MA 02139

“REPOSITORY SERVICES STRATEGIST, MIT Libraries, to develop and plan services and lead outreach related to digital repositories-based collections in order to   meet the needs of MIT researchers; leverage repository services to enable and support a robust, sustainable, equitable, and open scholarly communications ecosystem; and advance computational modes of access to repository-based collections.  Responsibilities include developing repository services strategies (70%), repository services support (20%), data analysis (5%), and committee/project work (5%). …”

Computational Support for Statutory Interpretation with Caselaw Access Project Data | Library Innovation Lab

“This post is about a research paper (preprint) on sentence retrieval for statutory interpretation that we presented at the International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2019) held in June at Montreal, Canada. The paper describes some of our recent work on computational methods for statutory interpretation carried out at the University of Pittsburgh. The idea is to focus on vague statutory concepts and enable a program to retrieve sentences that explain the meaning of such concepts. The Library Innovation Lab’s Caselaw Access Project (CAP) provides an ideal corpus of case law that is needed for such work….”

Publisher Liaison, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine

“Responsibilities

Serve as a Technical Information Specialist responsible to coordinate the review and selection of materials, develop and maintain related processes, and contribute to policy formulation for a premier biomedical citation database and journal archive.
Interpret and communicate NLM policies to high level publishers’ representatives, organizations, and information centers in the U.S. and worldwide.
Provide technical consultation and support to facilitate the provision of biomedical information through NLM services.
Serves as a technical expert on journal publishing trends and scholarly communication issues .
Independently prepare written correspondence, reports, and news announcements to explain or publicize NLM’s policies for the review, selection, indexing and archiving of biomedical literature.
Coordinate and actively contribute to the meetings of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a U.S. government federal advisory committee responsible for reviewing and recommending journals for inclusion in MEDLINE….”

Equity and Open Access Librarian

“Working collegially with the Library Faculty, the Equity and Open Access Librarian [at California State University, East Bay (CSUEB)] will create new opportunities for the Libraries to: engage with diverse learner communities, especially first generation, transfer, and commuter students, and design equity-informed library programming and services to meet their needs; coordinate with the outreach librarian and the scholarly communications librarian to improve campus awareness of critical open education/access issues; support faculty awareness, discovery, and use of open textbooks and open education resources to enhance student access to affordable materials; coordinate with the assessment librarian to design effective assessment strategies of the Libraries’ equity and open access initiatives; keep current with trends and developments in equity-oriented and non-traditional student services; and, serve as a liaison for open education initiatives at a local institutional level and at a CSU system-wide level….”

Expanding Access to U.S. Law: Harvard’s Caselaw Access Project

“For more than six years a team at Harvard University Law School’s Library Innovation Lab has been busy working on the Caselaw Access Project (CAP), an initiative to digitize a collection of 360 years worth of United States court cases dating from 1658 to 2018. The project was initiated in an effort to make case law freely and easily available to legal scholars and the public. Last month, the fruits of the team’s labors were realized with the official launch of CAP. The published CAP corpus comprises 6.4 million unique cases and over 40 million pages of U.S. federal, state, and territorial case law documents from the Law School library.

CAP was funded and made possible by Harvard Law School and, in part, through a partnership with legal research and analytics startup Ravel. The new digital repository will help lower the cost of accessing historical court cases and it opens up new opportunities for legal scholars and programmers to process large sets of legal data via the CAP API and bulk data service. The CAP API enables users to browse and download cases using a few short commands and through its “bulk data” feature users can download whole zip files of content.

In the interview below, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Research Associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, discusses how CAP got started and the goals of the project….”

Expanding Access to U.S. Law: Harvard’s Caselaw Access Project

“For more than six years a team at Harvard University Law School’s Library Innovation Lab has been busy working on the Caselaw Access Project (CAP), an initiative to digitize a collection of 360 years worth of United States court cases dating from 1658 to 2018. The project was initiated in an effort to make case law freely and easily available to legal scholars and the public. Last month, the fruits of the team’s labors were realized with the official launch of CAP. The published CAP corpus comprises 6.4 million unique cases and over 40 million pages of U.S. federal, state, and territorial case law documents from the Law School library.

CAP was funded and made possible by Harvard Law School and, in part, through a partnership with legal research and analytics startup Ravel. The new digital repository will help lower the cost of accessing historical court cases and it opens up new opportunities for legal scholars and programmers to process large sets of legal data via the CAP API and bulk data service. The CAP API enables users to browse and download cases using a few short commands and through its “bulk data” feature users can download whole zip files of content.

In the interview below, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Research Associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, discusses how CAP got started and the goals of the project….”

Center for Open Data Enterprise (CODE)

“Open government data is a powerful tool for economic growth, social benefit, and scientific research. This global resource must be developed and managed in ways that meet the needs of the people and organizations that use it.

CODE brings together data providers and data users to develop better strategies that serve stakeholders and their common goals. 

CODE, founded as the Center for Open Data Enterprise, is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to maximize the value of open government data as a resource for economic growth, social good, and scientific research….”

Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science

“In order to increase the contribution of open science to producing better science, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science convenes critical stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting open science practices, current barriers of all types, and ways to move forward in order to align reward structures and institutional values. The Roundtable convenes two times per year and creates a venue for the exchange of ideas and joint strategic planning among key stakeholders. Each Roundtable meeting has a theme. The diverse themes target slightly different audiences but the core audience will consist of universities, government agencies, foundations, and other groups doing work related to open science. The Roundtable aims to improve coordination among stakeholders and increase awareness of current and future efforts in the broader open science community. The Roundtable will also convene one symposium per year, which may produce National Academies proceedings in brief….”

Meta-Research: Use of the Journal Impact Factor in academic review, promotion, and tenure evaluations | eLife

Abstract:  We analyzed how often and in what ways the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is currently used in review, promotion, and tenure (RPT) documents of a representative sample of universities from the United States and Canada. 40% of research-intensive institutions and 18% of master’s institutions mentioned the JIF, or closely related terms. Of the institutions that mentioned the JIF, 87% supported its use in at least one of their RPT documents, 13% expressed caution about its use, and none heavily criticized it or prohibited its use. Furthermore, 63% of institutions that mentioned the JIF associated the metric with quality, 40% with impact, importance, or significance, and 20% with prestige, reputation, or status. We conclude that use of the JIF is encouraged in RPT evaluations, especially at research-intensive universities, and that there is work to be done to avoid the potential misuse of metrics like the JIF.