Chance discovery of forgotten 1960s ‘preprint’ experiment

“For years, scientists have complained that it can take months or even years for a scientific discovery to be published, because of the slowness of peer review. To cut through this problem, researchers in physics and mathematics have long used “preprints” – preliminary versions of their scientific findings published on internet servers for anyone to read. In 2013, similar services were launched for biology, and many scientists now use them. This is traditionally viewed as an example of biology finally catching up with physics, but following a chance discovery in the archives of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Matthew Cobb, a scientist and historian at the University of Manchester, has unearthed a long-forgotten experiment in biology preprints that took place in the 1960s, and has written about them in a study publishing 16 November in the open access journal PLOS Biology.”

US Court Grants ISPs and Search Engine Blockade of Sci-Hub – TorrentFreak

“Sci-Hub, often referred to as the “Pirate Bay of Science,” has suffered another blow in a US federal court. The American Chemical Society has won a default judgment of $4.8 million for alleged copyright infringement against the site. In addition, the publisher was granted an unprecedented injunction which requires search engines and ISPs to block the platform.”

MedPix

“MedPix® is a free open-access online database of medical images, teaching cases, and clinical topics, integrating images and textual metadata including over 12,000 patient case scenarios, 9,000 topics, and nearly 59,000 images. Our primary target audience includes physicians and nurses, allied health professionals, medical students, nursing students and others interested in medical knowledge….We are actively seeking new case contributions – which become a digital publication of MedPix® at the National Library of Medicine. Please join us in supporting one of the world’s largest open-access teaching files….”

Digital Public Library of America » Blog Archive » John S. Bracken to head Digital Public Library of America

“The Digital Public Library of America is pleased to announce that John S. Bracken has been selected to be the next Executive Director of DPLA, beginning December 4, 2017. A demonstrated leader in the field of digital innovation with nearly two decades of experience at philanthropic foundations, Bracken will lead DPLA in its next chapter of development, as the organization embarks upon its fifth year of operation….Bracken joins DPLA from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where he is vice president, technology innovation. He previously directed Knight’s journalism and media innovation program, before becoming vice president, media innovation. In these roles, he oversaw $100 million of technology funding, facilitated initiatives to enhance museum technology and library innovation, and supported projects to improve the creation, sharing, and use of information. Bracken also supervised the Knight News Challenge and the Knight Prototype Fund and helped to create a $27 million fund on artificial intelligence and ethics….”

G-8 Leaders Communique (June 18, 2013)

“Open government data are an essential resource of the information age. Moving data into the public sphere can improve the lives of citizens, and increasing access to these data can drive innovation, economic growth and the creation of good jobs. Making government data publicly available by default and reusable free of charge in machine-readable, readily-accessible, open formats, and describing these data clearly so that the public can readily understand their contents and meanings, generates new fuel for innovation by private sector innovators, entrepreneurs, and non-governmental organisations. Open data also increase awareness about how countries’ natural resources are used, how extractives revenues are spent, and how land is transacted and managed.

47. We have today agreed and published an Open Data Charter (annexed) with the following principles:

Open Data by Default – foster expectations that government data be published openly while continuing to safeguard privacy;

Quality and Quantity – release quality, timely and well described open data;

Useable by All – release as much data in as many open formats as possible;

Releasing Data for Improved Governance – share expertise and be transparent about data collection, standards and publishing processes;

Releasing Data for Innovation – consult with users and empower future generations of innovators….

We will publish individual action plans detailing how we will implement the Open Data Charter according to our national frameworks (October 2013)…[for example] Genome data, research and educational activity, experiment results….”

University System of Maryland Encourages Researchers to Consider Benefits of Open Access to Their Works – USM

“The University System of Maryland (USM) institutions have released a “Statement Supporting Open Access Dissemination of Scholarship,” a joint statement created by the university libraries of all 12 USM campuses. Councils representing the faculty, students, and the presidents of USM’s universities have collectively endorsed the statement. The statement explains the potential benefits to researchers who choose to make their works “freely available online either immediately upon completion, or within specified limited periods.”…”

Open access: A global movement – Open Access Week

“The open access (OA) movement is gaining worldwide consensus as more and more countries are joining the effort to make research freely available.  China has recently joined the ranks of the nations that are making a shift to OA. On May 15, 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), a major basic-science funding agency, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), one of China’s most prestigious research institutions, announced that researchers associated with these institutions would need to give u…. Interestingly, more research-funding agencies in China are expected to follow a similar policy. While OA has been gradually gaining support in China in the past few years, this move might bring a major change to academia in China. The research output of China has multiplied over the years—the country’s contribution to the total global articles has increased from 5.6% in 2003 to 13.9% in 2012, according to the data calculated using the Science Citation Index (…—and thus, the most significant upshot of this move to OA is that a wealth of scientific knowledge would become available to the world. However, a downside is that while studies in the natural sciences will gain public access, the humanities will not benefit from this newly declared policy. Nevertheless, in the wake of the OA movement, China is making new forays, one of which is a growing interest in partnerships to start new OA journals as reported in BioMed Central.”