Transformation from subscription model toward OA publishing model: JUSTICE OA2020 Roadmap

“JUSTICE has seen that there is no other way to overcome the situation except to consider new models, and has been gathering information about worldwide trends. As part of information gathering, we endorsed the OA2020 Expression of Interest in August 2016, and we have analyzed Japanese financial and publication data to confirm the feasibility of transformation. Creating the JUSTICE OA2020 Roadmap is following this work. Our goal is to clarify the way to go through the transition period until a fully OA publishing model can be realized. Academic institutions, including Japanese ones, have already paid APCs(4) in addition to subscription fees as the cost of scholarly communication, and total amount of these costs have been increasing. If we leave the cost increases unchecked, we will not be able to keep the subscription model (cannot read) or pay for APCs (cannot publish). We need to shift our axis from read to publish to avoid this future, and at the same time, we have to find a model which is able to manage the total cost of publication (subscription fees plus APCs)….”

JUSTICE (Japan Alliance of University Library Consortia for E-Resources)

Japan Alliance of University Library Consortia for E-Resources ?JUSTICE?is a consortium created to promote many activities for providing stably and continuously academic information, including e-journal that is essential for education and research activities of the university in Japan. The mission assigned to JUSTICE is to contribute to the enhancement of the nation’s academic information infrastructure by contracting, managing, providing, and preserving e-resources and by training personnel with necessary skills.

JUSTICE was established in April 2011 with the support of the National Institute of Informatics(NII). At present, JUSTICE is comprised of over 500 participating libraries and is the nation’s largest organization of library consortia. “

100 days post cancellation of Elsevier – OpenAccess.se

“One hundred days have now passed since the contract with Elsevier was terminated. The cancellation has received a lot of attention, both from within Sweden and abroad. Questions and comments from researchers to libraries have been much fewer than expected, something which can partly be explained by the summer vacation period, but most probably due to the fact that users have not been greatly affected since they still have uninterrupted access to all material published until the first of July 2018.

Comments from researchers have been both positive and negative. The support for open access is strong and many also regard the high profit margins of the publisher as unreasonable. Those with negative comments mostly concern problems accessing the articles they need for their research. All comments receive a reply with a description of the current situation, and underline the fact that all Swedish Vice-Chancellors collectively stand behind the recommendation to terminate the contract.

Some higher education institutions (HEIs) have used the money saved post-cancellation to pay for their researchers’ article processing charges in pure open access journals. Part of the money has also been used to pay for the extra costs involved when important articles have to be ordered via on-demand document delivery services….”

ARL Joins Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services | Association of Research Libraries® | ARL®

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has become a member of the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS), an initiative aimed at stabilizing a vital infrastructure of freely available open science (OS) services. In joining SCOSS, the Association is becoming part of an international effort to strategically and systematically focus on sustaining open access (OA) and OS services….”

Accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access to scientific publications: LERU’s reaction to Plan S

The League of European Research Universities (LERU)reaction to the announcement of ‘Plan S’

“Plan S represents a bold plan fundamentally to change the pattern of academic publishing, moving decisively away from subscription journals to full and immediate Open Access (OA). From 1 January 2020 academic publications, where the research has been funded by public grants provided by national and European Research Councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access platforms. The vision is ambitious and represents a further step in the unstoppable move to immediate Open Access. The researchers will retain their copyright and will not be able to assign it to publishers as a condition of being published. Article Processing Charges (APCs) will be capped at a certain level and, crucially, payment of hybrid APCs will no longer be possible via this funding mechanism.”

TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem)

“TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem) advances the wide dissemination of scholarship by humanities and humanistic social sciences faculty members through open access editions of peer-reviewed and professionally edited monographs.

Scholars face growing difficulty in finding publishers for their monographs as academic library budgets shrink and demand for monographs falls. To collaboratively address this problem, the Association of American Universities (AAU), Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and Association of University Presses (AUPresses) launched this initiative in spring 2017. 

In each of the first five years, colleges and universities participating in TOME are providing at least three baseline publishing grants of $15,000 to support the publication of open access monographs. Publishers accepting these grants—for eligible books that have been approved through the usual editorial and peer-review processes—are making high-quality, platform-agnostic, digital editions freely available. These TOME-supported monographs will make new research freely available online, increasing the presence of humanities and social science scholarship on the web and opening up knowledge to more readers….”

Open Scholarship | Association of Research Libraries® | ARL®

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared. For research libraries, open scholarship offers opportunities for campus collaborations and new service roles.

SHARE is a higher education initiative whose mission is to maximize research impact by making research widely accessible, discoverable, and reusable. To fulfill this mission SHARE is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle.

Below are links to information and resources on other key topics in open scholarship….”

Open Library Environment (OLE)

“OLE is a global library community that empowers libraries to collaborate on innovative and open solutions by pooling resources and insights….OLE empowers the library community to re-examine business operations and develop new workflows that reflect the changing nature of scholarship; OLE liberates libraries from outdated models and proprietary technologies through creative collaboration and open source development; OLE collaborates on open source initiatives that strengthen libraries’ capacity to innovate and meet the needs of their users; OLE builds inclusive partnerships focused on financial support, collaborative functional and technical design, software development, and support for OLE partners.

LIBER Launches Open Science Roadmap – LIBER

“Its implementation is, however, not yet universal. A revolution is required: one which opens up research processes and changes mindsets in favour of a world where policies, tools and infrastructures universally support the growth and sharing of knowledge. Research libraries are well placed to make that revolution happen and LIBER, as Europe’s largest network of research libraries, wants to support them in that endeavour. That’s why LIBER has written an Open Science Roadmap outlining the specific actions libraries can take to champion Open Science, both within and beyond their own institutions.”