Web Accessibility in the Institutional Repository: Crafting User-Centered Submission Policies: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  While institutional repositories have long focused on ensuring the availability of research, recent university initiatives have begun to focus on other aspects of open access, such as digital accessibility. Indiana University’s institutional repository (IR), IUScholarWorks, audited the accessibility of its existing content and created policies to encourage accessible submissions. No established workflows considering accessibility existed when this audit took place, and no additional resources were allocated to facilitate this shift in focus. As a result, the Scholarly Communication team altered the repository submission workflow to encourage authors to make their finished documents accessible with limited intervention. This paper shares an overview of the accessibility audit that took place, the changes made to our submission process, and finally provides tips and resources for universities who aim to integrate accessibility more thoroughly into their IR practices.

 

Guest Post – Citing Software in Scholarly Publishing to Improve Reproducibility, Reuse, and Credit – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Software is essential to research, and is regularly an element of the work described in scholarly articles. However, these articles often don’t properly cite the software, leading to problems finding and accessing it, which in turns leads to problems with reproducibility, reuse, and proper credit for the software’s developers. In response, the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group, comprised of scholarly communications researchers, representatives of nineteen major journals, publishers, and scholarly infrastructures (Crossref, DataCite), have proposed a set of customizable guidelines to clearly identify the software and credit its developers and maintainers. This follows the earlier development of a set of Software Citation Principles. To realize their full benefit, we are now urging publishers to adapt and adopt these guidelines to implement the principles and to meet their communities’ particular needs….”

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

Full article: Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire

Abstract:  Department and program evaluation plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire were examined to see if these documents provide evidence that could be used to justify supporting the publication of peer-reviewed open access articles toward tenure and promotion. In an earlier study, the authors reveal that faculty members at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire are more unaware of open access publishing than their counterparts at larger universities. These findings dovetail with other studies that show that faculty members are reluctant to publish in open access journals because of concerns about the quality of those journals. The existing body of scholarship suggests that tenure-line faculty fear publishing in open access journals because it could adversely impact their chances of promotion and tenure. The authors of this current study sought to determine if department and program evaluation plans could influence negative perceptions faculty have of open access journals. The implications of this study for librarians, scholarly communication professionals, tenure-line faculty, departments, and programs are addressed.

 

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

FAIR metrics and certification recommendations for EOSC | EOSCSecretariat

“Two further reports with recommendations have been released by the FAIR Working Group:

Recommendations on FAIR Metrics for EOSC – https://doi.org/10.2777/70791
Recommendations on certifying services required to enable FAIR within EOSC – https://doi.org/10.2777/127253 …”

The Open Research Lifecycle | Center for Open Science – YouTube

“Open science reduces waste and accelerates the discovery of knowledge, solutions, and cures for the world’s most pressing needs. Shifting research culture toward greater openness, transparency, and reproducibility is challenging, but there are incremental steps at every stage of the research lifecycle that can improve rigor and reduce waste. Visit cos.io to learn more.”

Open call for policy enhancement support | FAIRsFAIR

“Based on an initial landscape assessment and the work of related initiatives, FAIRsFAIR has prepared a series of recommendations for policy enhancement (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3686900) to support the realisation of a FAIR ecosystem. We invite expressions of interest from policy makers at all levels to work with us to assess their current policies against these recommendations and to consider how the policies might be adapted to better support the emergence of a FAIR ecosystem.

We are keen to work with policy makers in various settings (national, funding body, publisher, organisational, research infrastructure, repository) and at different levels of policy development and implementation….”