SCOSS

“While such [OA] policy directives are essential to advancing open access, so too is an infrastructure that can support a publishing landscape steadily migrating to a state where “Open” is the default.

Many key services that now comprise the existing infrastructure, which has evolved over time, are non-commercial and far from financially secure. Some could even be described as “at risk”.

Being that many of these services are now fundamental to implementing Open Access and Open Science policies and supporting these workflows, securing them has become a growing concern of the broader OA and OS community.

The formation of the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) represents a community-led effort to help maintain, and ultimately secure, vital infrastructure….

The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) is a network of influential organisations committed to helping secure OA and OS infrastructure well into the future. Officially formed in early 2017, SCOSS’ purpose is to provide a new co-ordinated cost-sharing framework that will ultimately enable the broader OA and OS community to support the non-commercial services on which it depends.

SCOSS will function primarily to help identify and track, via a registry, non-commercial services essential to Open Science, and to make qualified recommendations on which of these services should be considered for funding support….”

Early career researchers want Open Science | Genome Biology | Full Text

“Open Science is encouraged by the European Union and many other political and scientific institutions. However, scientific practice is proving slow to change. We propose, as early career researchers, that it is our task to change scientific research into open scientific research and commit to Open Science principles.”

The future of Open Access should not be left to the legacy publishers

“It is unreasonable and unrealistic to expect the legacy publisher’s shareholders to voluntarily forgo their projected profits. The interests of the legacy publishers cannot co?exist with the ideals of many of us in the Open Access movement.

The way forward for Open Access, therefore, can not be guided by the legacy publishers.”

Developing Open Data policies | FOSTER

Describes what an Open Data policy covers; discusses the content of a model Open Data policy; gives a practical checklist for developing an Open Data policy; discusses what makes an Open Data policy effective; and analyses existing policies of funders and links to examples.

Research Libraries Powering Sustainable Knowledge in the Digital Age: LIBER Europe Strategy 2018-2022

“The 2018-2022 LIBER Strategy, which will steer LIBER’s development over the next five years, will support LIBER libraries in facing coming changes in the European working environment such as the various initiatives in advancing Open Science. It will also enable research in LIBER organisations to be world class. The leading role of LIBER brings added value to the implementation of the Strategy at a European level. …The term Open Science is not mentioned specifically in the Strategy. Instead, we emphasise innovative scholarly communication and digital skills and services, as well as research infrastructures to enable sustainable knowledge in the digital age…. Our Vision for the research landscape in 2022 is that the role of research libraries will lie in Powering Sustainable Knowledge in the Digital Age:

• Open Access is the predominant form of publishing;

• Research Data is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR);

• Digital Skills underpin a more open and transparent research life cycle;

• Research Infrastructure is participatory, tailored and scaled to the needs of the diverse disciplines;

• The cultural heritage of tomorrow is built on today’s digital information….

Open Access of Research Publications: this theme will encompass developing innovative services on top of the repository network, developments regarding Open Access business models for journals and the role of libraries therein, and the possibilities for libraries as Open Access publishers and innovative publishing…Semantic Interoperability; Open and Linked Data: research libraries are experts in metadata and ontologies and need to take a leadership role and engage with other stakeholders to ensure interoperability and accessibility of content….”

Practical guide to building future proof Open Data Portals – European Data Portal

“The EU Member States are making visible progress with regard to their Open Data transformation journey, with many Open Data initiatives as well as portals being launched each year. However in order to ensure such data infrastructures remain relevant over time, a series of aspects should be considered and embedded in the design stages of any Open Data portal.”

What is the Paris OER Declaration? | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

“The World OER Congress held at UNESCO, Paris on 20-22 June 2012,…Recommends that States, within their capacities and authority: …Promote and use OER to widen access to education at all levels, both formal and non-formal….Promote the development of specific policies for the production and use of OER within wider strategies for advancing education….Facilitate the re-use, revision, remixing and redistribution of educational materials across the world through open licensing….”

Jussieu Call for Open Science and Bibliodiversity

“This Call was drafted on the campus Jussieu in Paris by a French group comprising researchers and scientific publishing professionals working together in Open Access and Public Scientific Publishing task forces of BSN (Bibliothèque scientifique numérique, or Digital Scientific Library).

This Call is aimed at scientific communities, professional associations and research institutions to promote a scientific publishing open-access model fostering bibliodiversity and innovation without involving the exclusive transfer of journal subscription monies to APC payments….

We find it necessary to foster an Open Access model that is not restricted to a single approach based on the transfer of subscriptions towards APCs (publication fees charged to authors to allow free access to their articles). Such an approach would hamper innovation and otherwise would slow if not check the advent of bibliodiversity….

Open Access must be complemented by support for the diversity of those acting in scientific publishing – what we call bibliodiversity – putting an end to the dominance of a small number among us imposing their terms to scientific communities….

The scientific communities must be able to access national and international infrastructures which guarantee the preservation and circulation of knowledge against any privatization of contents….

Priority should be given to business models that do not involve any payments, neither for authors to have their texts published nor for readers to access them. Many fair funding models exist and only require to be further developed and extended: institutional support, library contributions or subsidies, premium services, participatory funding or creation of open archives, etc. We endorse the clear message to the scientific community at large released by the League of European Research Universities (LERU): Research funding should go to research, not to publishers! This is why current journal subscription spendings should be changed into investments enabling the scientific community to regain control over the publishing system and not merely into new spendings only earmarked to pay the publication fees for researchers to commercial publishers….

We call on creating an international consortium of stakeholders whose primary aim should be to pool local and national initiatives or to build an operational framework to fund open access publishing, innovation and sharing of resulting developments. We call on research organizations and their libraries to secure and earmark as of now a share of their acquisition budgets to support the development of scientific publishing activities, which are genuinely open and innovative, and address the needs of the scientific community….”

A Cooperative Publishing Model for Sustainable Scholarship

Abstract:  Organizing scholarly publishing as a cooperative business has the promise of making journals more affordable and scholarly publishing more sustainable. The authors describe the development of the modern cooperative from its beginnings in England during the Industrial Revolution and highlight the great extent and diversity of business worldwide that is currently done cooperatively. Some of the current initiatives in scholarly publishing (SPARC, PLoS, German Academic Publishing, etc.) are analysed in light of cooperative business principles, and it is shown that, while these models often partially utilize cooperative business practices, none of them has adopted the cooperative model in totality.