Mallorca Declaration on Open Science (January 2016)

“Open Science is essential if the world is to successfully address the major challenges that it now faces. To have impact, Open Science must be based on accessibility, transparency and integrity, enabling trusted collaboration for research excellence and optimal delivery. This declaration specifically addresses the key barriers to Open Science, and builds on previous statements concerning Open Science…. 1. Remove the barriers that extreme competition for limited resources create for Open Science True progress on Open Science…. 2. Implement Open Access publishing where publication is part of the continuum of research…. 3. Establish competence and confidence in the practice of Open Data…. 4. Ensure research integrity…. 5. A cohesive European approach….” 

New reports on the European Open Science Cloud governance and on Open Access Publishing in Europe. | eoscpilot.eu

“The Open Science Policy Platform has adopted consensual reports on the European Open Science Cloud governance and on Open Access Publishing in Europe. The report on EOSC includes recommendations on governance and financial schemes, while the report on Open Science Publishing gives recommendations on how to implement open access publishing in Europe by 2020.”

Open Access to Scientific Information in Croatia : Increasing Research Impact of a Scientifically Peripheral Country – Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Institutional Repository

Abstract:  Open Access (OA) to scientific information has become, during the last decade, an important means of communicating in science. The most important fact, proved by numerous studies, is that OA can increase visibility and impact of research results. The first chapter of the book gives an overview of the beginnings of formal scientific communication as an introduction to the further discussion on OA, especially OA in developing and transition countries. In the second chapter, basic definitions of OA and basic OA initiatives are explained as well as the two ways of achieving OA. The third chapter analyses access barriers for scientifically peripheral countries and the ways of removing them. Chapters four and five are completely dedicated to the Open Access in Croatia. Using an example of Croatia, the possibilities of increasing research results of a scientifically peripheral country are explained. Results of the complete study of OA in Croatia are analysed and explained. The study consists of two parts – study of Croatian OA journals and study of Croatian OA repositories. In the first part, the data on editorial policy regarding electronic publishing are gathered by the method of web content analysis. In the sample are all the Croatian scientific journals that had, by the end of June 2010, at least one 2009 issue freely available on the internet. The second part of the study discusses the problem of OA repositories in Croatia and gives an example of such a repository. Recommendations for further development of OA in Croatia are given as a part of the conclusion.

Berlin Appeal for Open Science sent to decision-makers – Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)

“Although Open Science is an issue currently being discussed by policy-makers in Germany and at EU level, there is a lack of drive to implement it in practice. In the context of the Open Science Fellows Program initiated by Wikimedia Deutschland and the Stifterverband in 2016, young academics have joined forces and, working in accordance with the principles of Open Science, have drawn up five points that need to be implemented in policy and research in order to make full use of the advantages it offers: the Berlin Appeal for Open Science. They call for the basic conditions for Open Science to be further improved in a bid to promote the cultural transition towards more openness in science. Only then can the possibilities offered by Open Science be fully exploited, enabling us to advance as a knowledge society.”

Are Library Vendors a Necessary Evil? – Academic libraries and open access – Medium

“When a public institution outsources the production and provision of goods or services to an external enterprise?—?whether it be the federal government buying missiles from a commercial defense contractor or a library paying for online access from scholarly societies and software licenses from for-profit vendors?—?it’s easy to end up with prices marked up like in a hotel mini-bar, as evidenced by a $435 hammer or a $507,000 subscription to a few dozen chemistry journals. We can move in a better direction, through policy and practice, with advocacy and support for open access publications, open textbooks, open education resources, institutional repositories, and free or open source software….”

A manifesto for reproducible science | Nature Human Behaviour

Improving the quality and transparency in the reporting of research is necessary to address this. The Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) guidelines offer standards as a basis for journals and funders to incentivize or require greater transparency in planning and reporting of research….The TOP guidelines54,65 promote open practices, while an increasing number of journals and funders require open practices (for example, open data), with some offering their researchers free, immediate open-access publication with transparent post-publication peer review (for example, the Wellcome Trust, with the launch of Wellcome Open Research). Policies to promote open science can include reporting guidelines or specific disclosure statements (see Box 6). At the same time, commercial and non-profit organizations are building new infrastructure such as the Open Science Framework to make transparency easy and desirable for researchers…..”

Towards open science in Argentina: From experiences to public policies | Arza | First Monday

Abstract:  The emergence and wide diffusion of information and communication technologies created ever increasing opportunities for sharing and collaboration, which shortened geographic, disciplinary and expertise distances. There exist various technologies, tools and infrastructure that facilitate collaborative production processes in various social spheres, and scientific production is not an exception. Open science produces scientific knowledge in a collaborative way, including experts and non-experts and to share the outcomes of knowledge creation processes. We identify 68 open science initiatives in Argentina using different primary and secondary sources. This paper describes those experiences in terms of goals, disciplines and openness along research stages. Building on the relationship between characteristics of openness and expected benefits, we discuss policy implications in order to better support openness and collaboration in science.

Achieving Open Access by 2020: tracking universities’ progress and guidelines for the future

“In furthering its work in the area of open science, EUA releases today a series of aims and recommendations on open access, with the purpose of further assisting European universities and National Rectors’ Conferences (NRCs) in the transition towards a more open scholarly communication system.”

Checklist for the Publication of Open Access Journals at Research Institutions | hc:14603 | Humanities CORE

“Research institutions increasingly act as supporting organisations and service providers for scholarly publications. Professional publishing of Open Access journals is possible without recourse to commercial suppliers by means of the internet and free software. This requires basic know how which is presented in form of this checklist. Over the past few years many research institutions have begun to establish advisory services that may be consulted in addition to this checklist. Occasionally they even offer technical infrastructures that enable editors to focus on content and quality of their journals. At the same time this checklist may act as supplementary material for consulting sessions that research services (libraries, university publishers …) offer to editors.”

Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition

“Learning ecosystems must be agile enough to support the practices of the future. In using tools and platforms like LMS, educators have a desire to unbundle all of the components of a learning experience to remix open content and educational apps in unique and compelling ways….While emerging technological developments such as digital courseware and open educational resources (OER) have made it easier to engage with learning resources, significant issues of access and equity persist among students from low-income, minority, single-parent families, and other disadvantaged groups….”