Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

Get ready for Horizon Europe: Open Science – The Guild

“Open Science will become the modus operandi in Horizon Europe, the next EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. This will affect provisions such as those regarding publications, research data management, and the engagement of citizens in the project.

To provide a glimpse into the expected changes, The Guild interviewed Mr. Konstantinos Glinos, Head of Unit for Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG RTD). 

During this discussion, we first explore the topic of Open Science as a strategic priority, its contribution to research efficiency, and the barriers that prevent the speeding up and the uptake and implementation of Open Science. We then delve into the main changes expected in Horizon Europe in the areas of Open Access, research data management, and Citizen Science. Finally, we also examine how Open Science could be embedded in the entire research process, from the methodology definition until the sharing of final results.  

We hope this video will help researchers and institutions to prepare for the forthcoming requirements in Horizon Europe….”

Arcadia Fund | Our response to UKRI’s open access review consultation – Arcadia Fund

“The publisher must make efforts to advertise the existence of a freely available version on the DOI-landing page of the publisher version of the work, and in all metadata supplied in the form of MARC records, ONIX feeds, and CrossRef DOI associated metadata. The licence of the work should be clearly given on the DOI-landing page and in all forms of associated metadata that the publisher supplies be it MARC or ONIX or DOI or all. If the publisher is known to not provide adequate metadata about open access and open access licensing, then withhold all Book Publishing Charges from that publisher until they provide it. Better still, warn authors not to submit to the publisher with a ‘blacklist’ of non-compliant publishers.

Some publishers both in journals and in monographs have been doing rather sneaky things to hide the existence of a freely accessible version. See Piwowar (2018) ‘Where’s Waldo With Public Access Links’. For ‘gold’ open access works, ensure the publisher creates a link from which the entirety of the book can be downloaded as PDF (or other format e.g. EPUB) in one-click – far too many platforms break-up books into chapters with absolutely no provision of a link to download the work in its entirety – this is annoying for users….”

Universal Funders’ Policy on Open Deposition of Publication-Associated Records

“A condition of being awarded funding by [FUNDER] is that researchers commit to making all source evidence such as data and computer code supporting published research — hence referred to in this policy as the records — publicly available as Open Access outputs, to the maximum extent permitted by relevant legal and ethical requirements. Where the materials can be legally and ethically published and made available, they must be released in synchrony with peer-reviewed outputs rather than at the end of the project. “Data will be available upon (reasonable) request from the corresponding author(s)” will no longer be acceptable in publications featuring work funded by [FUNDER]. …”

Universal Funders’ Policy on Open Deposition of Publication-Associated Records

“A condition of being awarded funding by [FUNDER] is that researchers commit to making all source evidence such as data and computer code supporting published research — hence referred to in this policy as the records — publicly available as Open Access outputs, to the maximum extent permitted by relevant legal and ethical requirements. Where the materials can be legally and ethically published and made available, they must be released in synchrony with peer-reviewed outputs rather than at the end of the project. “Data will be available upon (reasonable) request from the corresponding author(s)” will no longer be acceptable in publications featuring work funded by [FUNDER]. …”

EU Open Science Policy Platform Final Report

The European Commission (EC)’s Directorate-General for Research and Innovation (DG R&I) published the final report of the second mandate of the European Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP), entitled “Progress on Open Science: Towards a Shared Research Knowledge System“. The European OSPP is a High-Level Advisory Group established by the EC DG R&I in May 2016 and made up of 25 expert representatives of the broad constituency of European science stakeholders. This OSPP final report provides a brief overview of its four-year mandate (from 2016 to 2020), followed by an update on progress over the past two years since the publication of the OSPP’s recommendations across the EC’s eight ambitions on Open Science. It proposes a vision for moving beyond Open Science to create a shared research knowledge system by 2030.

We have no time to waste in the transition to Open Access

“I understand why you say that, but I don’t think that is necessarily the case. cOAlition S has been faulted for focusing primarily on an accelerated transition towards Open Access by legacy publishers and existing journals. But let us not forget that these existing journals are where the grantholders of the cOAlition S funders want to publish. One the one hand, we ask of our researchers that they keep copyright and publish in CC-By. But in return we feel that we have to make sure that they can keep publishing in the journals that they know and love. So that means we decided to focus on creating incentives for the transformation of these journals into Open Access journals, steering them away from the hybrid impasse….

Publishers who wish to stick with subscription journals will have to give their authors the right to keep copyright and to publish in CC-BY, and additionally allow them to immediately deposit a copy of the AAM or the VoR in a Green repository. Note that publishers such as Sage and Emerald already allow authors to deposit their articles in a repository without embargo…..”

Personal open access report with one click – SNF

Which of my scientific publications are openly accessible? As of now, researchers in Switzerland can find the answer to this question by using the “SNSF Open Access Check” web application. This prototype searches articles that have been published since 2015.

A first-of-its-kind partnership to drive the future of open science in the Netherlands

“A partnership that aims to deliver a new way of working for science has been forged between the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU), the Netherlands Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU), the Dutch Research Council (NWO) and Elsevier. The partnership includes publishing and reading services for Dutch research institutions. As a result, 95 percent of Dutch articles can be made immediately open access. The agreement also covers access to all Elsevier content.

What’s significant about this agreement is that the parties involved worked in partnership to carefully develop a collaboration that will shape new open science services in the Netherlands. The country has a notable heritage in higher education spanning hundreds of years. The QS World University Rankings 2019 includes 13 universities in the Netherlands, all within the world’s top 350 and seven in the top 150 — a testament to the strong international reputation of Dutch institutions. To help the country remain at the forefront of research in the decades to come, this partnership includes the development of open science services related to research intelligence and scholarly communication, making it the first such agreement of its kind. Open Science aims to make science more open, reproducible, inclusive and collaborative….”