Cost-benefit analysis for FAIR research data – ENVRI community

FAIR research data encompasses the way to create, store and publish research data in a way that they are findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. In order to be FAIR, research data published should meet certain criteria described by the FAIR principles. Despite this, many research performing organisations and infrastructures are still reluctant to apply the FAIR principles and share their datasets due to real or perceived costs, including time investment and money.

To answer such concerns, this report formulates 36 policy recommendations on cost-effective funding and business models to make the model of FAIR data sustainable. It provides evidence to decision makers on setting up short and long-term actions pertinent to the practical implementation of FAIR principles….”

The future of scientific publishing – Sarr – 2019 – BJS – Wiley Online Library

“The advent of social media, more recently the focus and emphasis on open access publishing, and now the unprecedented creation of open access journals, have led to many challenges and also potential opportunities for publishers, authors and even editors of established scientific journals. Although change is good, and an opportunity, serious academics should be aware of the potential ramifications of these forces if we do not attempt actively to preserve the integrity of the scientific word. This editorial will address two aspects of the current world of publishing that threaten the future of scientific investigation: first, the move to making all journals open access, and, second, the viral proliferation of open access journals and its effects, both real and theoretical….”

Easily record open access compliance and cost

A new service enabling institutions to record data relating to the publication of Open Access outputs by their academics, including both ‘Gold’ and ‘Green’ publication routes, which can then be used for reporting to funders….”

Easily record open access compliance and cost

A new service enabling institutions to record data relating to the publication of Open Access outputs by their academics, including both ‘Gold’ and ‘Green’ publication routes, which can then be used for reporting to funders….”

The UK’s aggregation Article Processing Charge (APC) data, ready for you to explore

Monitor UK is a new service presenting APC (article processing charge) data from across the UK in the form of a number of easy-to-use reports. These will enable institutions and funders to explore and evaluate UK cost and compliance data relating to open access publishing….”

The UK’s aggregation Article Processing Charge (APC) data, ready for you to explore

Monitor UK is a new service presenting APC (article processing charge) data from across the UK in the form of a number of easy-to-use reports. These will enable institutions and funders to explore and evaluate UK cost and compliance data relating to open access publishing….”

Journal articles ‘should cost £300 to publish’ | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Publishers are hugely inflating their costs through unnecessary spending on marketing, lobbying and executive pay packets, according to open access campaigners who have calculated what they claim is the real cost of publishing.

It should cost on average just $400 (£315) to publish an academic paper, and at the very most about $1,000 for very selective journals with high rejection rates, an analysis says.

This is far less than the prices universities currently pay publishers, it argues: estimates of costs vary, but subscription journals receive about $4,000 to $5,000 per article, while article processing fees for open access papers average at least $1,470….”

Assessing the size of the affordability problem in scholarly publishing [PeerJ Preprints]

Abstract:  For many decades, the hyperinflation of subscription prices for scholarly journals have concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open access has been proposed as the latest potential solution. However, also the prices for open access publishing are high and are rising well beyond inflation. What has been missing from the public discussion so far is a quantitative approach to determine the actual costs of efficiently publishing a scholarly article using state-of-the-art technologies, such that informed decisions can be made as to appropriate price levels. Here we provide a granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer-review, to publication, indexing and archiving. We find that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per article in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%. The publication costs for a representative scholarly article today come to lie at around US$400. We discuss the additional non-publication items that make up the difference between publication costs and final price.

Sustaining Values and Scholarship A Statement by the Provosts of the Big Ten Academic Alliance

“We, the provosts of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, are committed to sustaining and advancing equitable modes of sharing knowledge. Our 14 institutions embrace individual mission statements that support the common good, equity of access, and the global impact and reach of our research and scholarship. Collectively, our institutions’ more than 50,000 faculty are supported by over $10 billion (2017) in research funding, and our institutions have similarly invested significantly in our capacity to further our missions to advance knowledge. Together, we produce roughly 15% of the research publications in the United States….

In 2006, we shared an open letter in support of taxpayer access to federally-funded research. In 2012, we repeated our advocacy for open access in the face of potentially restrictive legislation to curtail that openness. Since then, our institutions have further invested in systems, repositories, and local policies to support open access to the works of our faculty. And we have encouraged our libraries and faculty to work together to assess the value of purchased or licensed content and the appropriate terms governing its use. With Big Ten libraries’ expenditures on journals exceeding $190 million, we recognize that our institutions are privileged in the level of access we provide our campuses, yet the status quo is not sustainable….”

 

 

Studie om inter­na omför­del­nings­mo­del­ler av kost­na­der inom Bibsam­kon­sor­ti­et – Kungliga biblioteket – kb.se

In recent years, the Bibsam consortium has signed transformational agreements where Open Access publishing accounts for part of the cost. An independent consultant will now investigate and produce scenarios for models for how the costs can be distributed among the participating organisations….”