Partner with PeerJ to build a new ecosystem for society publishing

Earlier this year we wrote about a renewed focus on community at PeerJ. This post is the first in a series on new programs and innovations we’re launching at PeerJ as part of our community development. 

In this post we:

  • Consider the pressures on scholarly societies and their members in the current landscape
  • Describe new publishing opportunities at PeerJ for societies and member associations
  • Call for partners to help us build a new and productive ecosystem for society publishing

A recurring theme in our research in the Communities Team has been the future of scholarly societies. Whether it’s authors choosing to publish with us to meet OA requirements their society cannot fulfill; concerns from society board members about slowly but steadily falling membership and financial reserves (exacerbated by conferences cancelled this year and next due to COVID-19); or societies wanting to launch and manage an OA journal, but put off by the complexity, cost and ongoing investment to maintain and sustain a fledgling title: the current dynamics in STM publishing can make life difficult for societies, especially smaller membership organizations. Meanwhile, the focus of many publishers has been on alternative business models and transformative deals at the institutional/funder level. 

Here at PeerJ we believe that scholarly societies and the communities they support and develop are vital to a thriving academic and research ecosystem, so we are hoping to offer an opportunity to societies and a solution to many of their concerns. 

Society Publishing with PeerJx

We are currently seeking partners to co-develop a new ecosystem for societies that we believe can answer many of the concerns we have heard. Our first step towards this new ecosystem is to develop PeerJx. 

Inspired by the relationship between TED and TEDx events, PeerJx focuses on local research communities and membership organizations. PeerJx partner sites are built on PeerJ’s journal portfolio, platform and infrastructure, but partners have their own editorial responsibilities and community development opportunities. Partners and their members benefit from the platform, service and reputation of PeerJ – and our highly-regarded portfolio of indexed, peer-reviewed journals – with the opportunity to build their own publication pathway, increase their member numbers, and develop their community and opportunities for them to interact.

PeerJx is designed around choice and flexibility for our partners. We know one size won’t fit everyone, so partners can integrate their own branding, and choose the editorial model, community tools, website configuration and even business model to create a bespoke publishing outlet best suited to their organization and members. 

Choose your journals

Choose to partner with PeerJ and you can choose which PeerJ journals to build into your PeerJx publishing pathway. 

PeerJx removes the administrative effort and cost of launching a new journal, and allows your members to submit to the highly regarded and indexed journals in PeerJ’s portfolio. Our journals’ excellent reputation, broad audience and high-quality peer review standards means your members can submit to your PeerJx knowing their research will be highly visible, widely disseminated, indexed in all the important databases and responsibly archived. Your members can choose to submit to any of our seven journals.

Choose your editorial model

Choose to take control of your publishing pathway. Partners can choose to form their own Senior Editorial Team and Editorial Board, and choose whether they want to curate content including blogs, news and announcements into their PeerJx site alongside their community’s research articles. There are three initial PeerJx editorial models:

Choose to reduce publishing costs for your members

Members of partner organizations submitting to their society’s PeerJx will enjoy a discount on our standard Article Processing Charges, or can purchase of one of our PeerJ Membership packages.

Partners can also choose to take collective action to reduce the cost of publishing for their members. Partner societies have the option to choose from a sliding scale of annual contributions – based on the size of their membership – to reduce article processing charges for their members. 

We anticipate developing business models in tandem with prospective partners to ensure the publishing with PeerJ is as accessible as possible. Our aim is to eliminate cost as a barrier to partners from participating.

As the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program develops and grows we intend to build models and revenue streams that will result in reductions to the publishing costs for Partners’ Members and profit shares with Partner organizations.

Choose to partner with PeerJ

We want to build an accessible, equitable solution for societies and members organizations seeking their own publishing outlet – or an Open Access option to compliment their current publications – without the cost and administrative burden of launching and maintaining a new journal. The PeerJ Partner Publishing Program and the PeerJx concept are still in their nascency and we hope partners will choose to work with us to help develop the program and its core concepts to ensure they meet your requirements.

Want to find out more?

If you’d like to find out more, you can download the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program prospectus here. We’d love to have the opportunity to talk through in more detail what societies would want from such a partnership – we want to develop the core concepts with prospective partners so we build something they want and need. If you’d like to help us develop a new and flourishing ecosystem for open access society publishing please get in touch: nathaniel.gore@peerj.com 

Partner with PeerJ to build a new ecosystem for society publishing

Earlier this year we wrote about a renewed focus on community at PeerJ. This post is the first in a series on new programs and innovations we’re launching at PeerJ as part of our community development. 

In this post we:

  • Consider the pressures on scholarly societies and their members in the current landscape
  • Describe new publishing opportunities at PeerJ for societies and member associations
  • Call for partners to help us build a new and productive ecosystem for society publishing

A recurring theme in our research in the Communities Team has been the future of scholarly societies. Whether it’s authors choosing to publish with us to meet OA requirements their society cannot fulfill; concerns from society board members about slowly but steadily falling membership and financial reserves (exacerbated by conferences cancelled this year and next due to COVID-19); or societies wanting to launch and manage an OA journal, but put off by the complexity, cost and ongoing investment to maintain and sustain a fledgling title: the current dynamics in STM publishing can make life difficult for societies, especially smaller membership organizations. Meanwhile, the focus of many publishers has been on alternative business models and transformative deals at the institutional/funder level. 

Here at PeerJ we believe that scholarly societies and the communities they support and develop are vital to a thriving academic and research ecosystem, so we are hoping to offer an opportunity to societies and a solution to many of their concerns. 

Society Publishing with PeerJx

We are currently seeking partners to co-develop a new ecosystem for societies that we believe can answer many of the concerns we have heard. Our first step towards this new ecosystem is to develop PeerJx. 

Inspired by the relationship between TED and TEDx events, PeerJx focuses on local research communities and membership organizations. PeerJx partner sites are built on PeerJ’s journal portfolio, platform and infrastructure, but partners have their own editorial responsibilities and community development opportunities. Partners and their members benefit from the platform, service and reputation of PeerJ – and our highly-regarded portfolio of indexed, peer-reviewed journals – with the opportunity to build their own publication pathway, increase their member numbers, and develop their community and opportunities for them to interact.

PeerJx is designed around choice and flexibility for our partners. We know one size won’t fit everyone, so partners can integrate their own branding, and choose the editorial model, community tools, website configuration and even business model to create a bespoke publishing outlet best suited to their organization and members. 

Choose your journals

Choose to partner with PeerJ and you can choose which PeerJ journals to build into your PeerJx publishing pathway. 

PeerJx removes the administrative effort and cost of launching a new journal, and allows your members to submit to the highly regarded and indexed journals in PeerJ’s portfolio. Our journals’ excellent reputation, broad audience and high-quality peer review standards means your members can submit to your PeerJx knowing their research will be highly visible, widely disseminated, indexed in all the important databases and responsibly archived. Your members can choose to submit to any of our seven journals.

Choose your editorial model

Choose to take control of your publishing pathway. Partners can choose to form their own Senior Editorial Team and Editorial Board, and choose whether they want to curate content including blogs, news and announcements into their PeerJx site alongside their community’s research articles. There are three initial PeerJx editorial models:

Choose to reduce publishing costs for your members

Members of partner organizations submitting to their society’s PeerJx will enjoy a discount on our standard Article Processing Charges, or can purchase of one of our PeerJ Membership packages.

Partners can also choose to take collective action to reduce the cost of publishing for their members. Partner societies have the option to choose from a sliding scale of annual contributions – based on the size of their membership – to reduce article processing charges for their members. 

We anticipate developing business models in tandem with prospective partners to ensure the publishing with PeerJ is as accessible as possible. Our aim is to eliminate cost as a barrier to partners from participating.

As the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program develops and grows we intend to build models and revenue streams that will result in reductions to the publishing costs for Partners’ Members and profit shares with Partner organizations.

Choose to partner with PeerJ

We want to build an accessible, equitable solution for societies and members organizations seeking their own publishing outlet – or an Open Access option to compliment their current publications – without the cost and administrative burden of launching and maintaining a new journal. The PeerJ Partner Publishing Program and the PeerJx concept are still in their nascency and we hope partners will choose to work with us to help develop the program and its core concepts to ensure they meet your requirements.

Want to find out more?

If you’d like to find out more, you can download the PeerJ Partner Publishing Program prospectus here. We’d love to have the opportunity to talk through in more detail what societies would want from such a partnership – we want to develop the core concepts with prospective partners so we build something they want and need. If you’d like to help us develop a new and flourishing ecosystem for open access society publishing please get in touch: nathaniel.gore@peerj.com 

PLOS and Transparency (including Plan S Price & Service Transparency Framework) – The Official PLOS Blog

“As a non-profit, mission-driven organization PLOS abides by our commitment to transparency. We openly share information and context about our finances, including target revenue amounts in some of our emerging business models. The Plan S Price & Service Transparency Framework provided us — and other publishers — a clear, uniform structure to share information about the services we perform and a percentage breakdown of how these are covered by the prices we charge. Many of our mission-driven publishing activities go well beyond peer review and production services. We provide commentary on some of these services, including how the varied editorial setups of our journals contribute to different percentage price breakdowns per title. We encourage other publishers to be transparent and openly share their data via such frameworks. And, we remain confident in showcasing how our prices cover our reasonable costs for a high level of service, with some margin for reinvestment….”

Scholar-led Open Access Publishers Are Not “Author-Chutes” · punctum books

“Both Open Book Publishers (OBP) and punctum books recently shared publicly that their per-title cost for high-quality open access monographs hovers somewhere around the $6,000 mark. This number is markedly different from the findings of the the 2016 Ithaka report “The Costs of Publishing Monographs,” which found that open access monographs published by university presses cost between $30,000 and $50,000.

As both institutional libraries and funding bodies invested in a transition to a fully open access scholarly communications landscape are naturally seeking how best to spend their money in the public interest, it comes as no surprise that the disclosure of our numbers, and accompanying financial transparency, has elicited diverse responses from the scholarly publishing world….

Rather, we invite university publishers to transparently disclose their financial records, so that we can level the playing field and have a discussion on what is really important: how we can help the entire scholarly communications landscape to transition to a sustainably open and cost-efficient access model, with the freedom to read, write, edit, and publish, and where public knowledge is truly accessible to the public.”

Survey of Academic Library Use of Cost per Download Data for Journals Subscriptions

“This study looks at how academic libraries, especially research oriented institutions, develop and use cost per download data in collection decision-making.  The study is based on data from 52 institutions, predominantly from the USA but also from Canada, the UK , continental Europe and elsewhere. 

Data in the report is broken out by type of institution (i.e. research university, doctoral-level, etc.) and by overall student enrollment, tuition, for public and private institutions and for those located in the USA and all other countries.  Data is also presented separately for collections oriented towards healthcare and medicine, and for multidisciplinary collections.

The 54-page study helps its readers to answer questions such as: How precise an idea do libraries have about the cost per download of their subscribed journals?  How many libraries feel that they measure this cost well?  What tools, applications or programs do they use to obtain or develop this data?  What makes it easier or harder to obtain such data?  How much confidence do they have in the accuracy of the data often made available by journals publishers? Do some of these publishers produce more reliable data than others? If so , which ones? Does the library use benchmarking data from other libraries or consortia when developing or using their in-hour cost per download data?  Exactly what is the cost per download for the library’s most and least expensive journals subscription packages? Is the library making any special efforts to obtain or obtain better cost per download data as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing pressure on library budgets?

Just a few of the study’s many findings are that:

Approximately half of the institutions surveyed said that they had a very or extremely precise idea of the cost per download of journal articles from their university collections.
Public college libraries were much more likely than private college libraries to use benchmarking data from other institutions.

Cost per download was generally higher in the USA than abroad and private colleges and universities tended to pay considerably higher costs per download than their public sector counterparts.

The median cost per download for the highest cost “Big Deal” from the libraries sampled was $15.00.”

How much does Open GLAM cost? Budget and impact of Open Access Registration, Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 11:00 AM | Eventbrite

“The impact that the COVID crisis is having on GLAM budgets is raising concerns among professionals and leadership. There is more demand for delivering and providing digital services and assets, but at the same time many budgets are shrinking. Digital departments are under increasing pressure to figure out how to connect the institution with users.

 

In this context, what does the future of Open GLAM look like? What strategies can be implemented for advancing Open Access to collections (“Open GLAM”) on a budget? How can people come up with new strategies and ideas to still open up their collections while maintaining healthy financial and human resources?

 

In this webinar, Effie, Nicole and Dafydd will talk about the value of opening up in times of crisis, different business models for providing open access to collections, and how its positive impact feeds back into the support for openness….”

Monitoring the effects of Plan S on Research and Scholarly Communication: an update | Plan S

“To initiate the dialogue amongst stakeholders on the effects of Plan S, cOAlition S has developed a monitoring framework by which funding agencies who are signatories of Plan S can track or monitor the most significant of these effects, both positive and negative. This framework has been primarily informed by the type of data funding agencies can collect and other available data sets, such that collated data against indicators from a cross-section of Plan S signatories will inform which effects are being realised and guide how cOAlition S might mitigate these effects….”

SURVEY OF ACADEMIC LIBRARY USE OF COST PER DOWNLOAD DATA

“Welcome to Primary Research Group’s survey of how academic librarians identify and monitor the cost per download for journal articles used by their library patrons, and how librarians then use this data. The survey should take less than 10 minutes and all participants receive a free PDF copy of the survey results….”

Four reports on the OA monograph: Review – Hill – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

Increasing interest in open access (OA) monographs is reflected by the publication of four reports in 2019.
The cost of transitioning monographs to OA is a constant source of concern among all stakeholders.
Print remains an important medium for monographs – but for how long?
The fully OA licences used for journals are considerably less popular within the monograph ecosystem.
The technical interoperability taken for granted among journals is not yet evident in digital monograph publishing….”

cOAlition S announces price transparency requirements | Plan S

Adhering to Plan’s S key principle of transparent pricing, cOAlition S publishes today its guidance on implementing price transparency when Open Access (OA) publication fees are applied. Specifically, cOAlition S announces that from July 1st, 2022 only publishers who provide data in line with one of the two endorsed price and service transparency frameworks will be eligible to receive OA publications funds from cOAlition S members. This covers funder contributions to any model of financing open access publications including, but not limited to, non-APC journals or platforms, article processing charges (APCs), transformative agreements, and transformative journals.