Encouraging Submission of FAIR Data at The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Letters | The Journal of Organic Chemistry

“The ACS is eager to assist. ACS has now developed a data packaging tool to assist authors in zipping their FID files, acquisition data, and processing parameters along with other appropriate FAIR metadata such as a SMILES or InChI for submission. This tool can be found at ACS Research Data Center, is free for any researcher to use, and includes instructions for authors on how to upload their data. In addition, author guidelines at The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Letters offer details on how to zip and submit your data (see Primary NMR Data Files under the Supporting Information heading). All zipped files of data should be uploaded as ‘Supporting Information for Publication’. Along with the zipped files of NMR data, original Elemental Analysis, HRMS, or IR reports are also encouraged and can be included as “Supporting Information for Publication’.

Including data alongside a publication has many benefits for authors, editors, reviewers, and readers. For authors, it will help in compliance with data-management plans and any funder requirements that data be made publicly available. The data will be citable and can be included in grant applications or updates to funders. Readily available data can provide a needed service to the community, much like reviewing, and will improve archiving for the long-term benefit of the scientific community. As an incentive, participating ACS publications identified with FAIR data will include a note in the PDF and HTML that FAIR data is available.

For editors and reviewers, it is valuable to have consistent quality of NMR and other data during the review process. While incidents of unethical behavior are rare, uploading original data can increase safeguarding against fraudulent or manipulated data. Providing data alongside a submission reduces requests from the editorial office for original FID data, for example, when the images uploaded in the SI are of inadequate resolution or appear to be manipulated.

For readers, access to primary data files allows for easy and direct comparison to published results. This is helpful when reproducing published work, specifically, to have the ability to evaluate compound purity, as well as zoom, integrate, and interact with the spectra….”

American Chemical Society joins other publishers in letter opposing administration’s changes to open access policy – American Chemical Society

“The American Chemical Society (ACS), as part of a coalition of 60 scientific societies, has issued a letter today expressing deep concern over changes proposed to the administration’s policy governing the open distribution of published journal articles containing federally funded research.If issued, these changes threaten the ability of the American scientific enterprise to remain a global leader in driving discovery and innovation.

Under the current policy, free and open distribution of journal articles containing work resulting from U.S. federally funded research is subject to a 12-month embargo. Under the proposed change, this embargo period would be removed, and the journal articles would need to be made freely available upon publishing.

“The proposed changes could result in unintended consequences that undermine the global scientific leadership of the U.S.,” says Glenn S. Ruskin, vice president, ACS External Affairs & Communications. “The proposed changes could also interfere with the efforts made by publishers to responsibly and transparently move toward greater open access of the research reported in their journals. We remain committed to working with all interested stakeholders to ensure the development of a robust and sustainable policy in this area.”

The full letter is available here….”

American Chemical Society joins other publishers in letter opposing administration’s changes to open access policy – American Chemical Society

“The American Chemical Society (ACS), as part of a coalition of 60 scientific societies, has issued a letter today expressing deep concern over changes proposed to the administration’s policy governing the open distribution of published journal articles containing federally funded research.If issued, these changes threaten the ability of the American scientific enterprise to remain a global leader in driving discovery and innovation.

Under the current policy, free and open distribution of journal articles containing work resulting from U.S. federally funded research is subject to a 12-month embargo. Under the proposed change, this embargo period would be removed, and the journal articles would need to be made freely available upon publishing.

“The proposed changes could result in unintended consequences that undermine the global scientific leadership of the U.S.,” says Glenn S. Ruskin, vice president, ACS External Affairs & Communications. “The proposed changes could also interfere with the efforts made by publishers to responsibly and transparently move toward greater open access of the research reported in their journals. We remain committed to working with all interested stakeholders to ensure the development of a robust and sustainable policy in this area.”

The full letter is available here….”

American Chemical Society and Max Planck institutes partner on transformative open access plan – American Chemical Society

The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the Max Planck Gesellschaft (MPG) announced today a collaborative open access strategic partnership that will advance shared goals for open science and enhance convenience for the MPG researcher and author community. Effective from the outset of 2019, the four-year transformative agreement provides researchers affiliated with Max Planck institutes the opportunity to disseminate immediately, under an open access license, 100 percent of their research articles upon acceptance and publication by a peer-reviewed ACS journal. MPG researchers also benefit from full reader access to all ACS Publications journals and Chemical & Engineering News….”

American Chemical Society and Max Planck institutes partner on transformative open access plan – American Chemical Society

The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the Max Planck Gesellschaft (MPG) announced today a collaborative open access strategic partnership that will advance shared goals for open science and enhance convenience for the MPG researcher and author community. Effective from the outset of 2019, the four-year transformative agreement provides researchers affiliated with Max Planck institutes the opportunity to disseminate immediately, under an open access license, 100 percent of their research articles upon acceptance and publication by a peer-reviewed ACS journal. MPG researchers also benefit from full reader access to all ACS Publications journals and Chemical & Engineering News….”

Where are we now?

“The results of publicly funded research must be freely available to all. By 2020, universities want to make all peer-reviewed articles by Dutch researchers open-access publications as standard. Following a request by the government, in 2013 the VSNU formulated a plan to achieve this goal.

‘The Dutch universities’ strategy is unique on the international stage,’ says Koen Becking, executive open-access negotiator for the VSNU and Executive Board President at Tilburg University. Together with Tim van der Hagen, Executive Board President at Delft University of Technology, and Anton Pijpers, Executive Board President at Utrecht University, he leads executive negotiations with the major publishing houses….

The Dutch approach is such a success because the universities have formed a single negotiating body and are supported by the government. In this regard, Becking refers to the government’s open-access policy, which was continued by the new government in 2017….”

 

Major Publishers File Second Lawsuit Against ResearchGate | The Scientist Magazine®

“The social networking site declined this proposal, and shortly after, a group of five publishers—the American Chemical Society (ACS), Brill, Elsevier, Wiley, and Wolters Kluwer—banded together to create the Coalition for Responsible Sharing, noting that it would take formal steps to change ResearchGate’s practices. The coalition, which has expanded to 15 members, has since done two things, says Milne, who is also ACS’s senior vice president. “Elsevier and ACS, as two representative organizations from the coalition, filed a suit in Germany to ask for the courts to address the infringement that we could see,” he tells The Scientist. And all members started sending takedown notices to ResearchGate and its users for articles identified as breeching copyright, he adds. …”

Publishers threaten to remove millions of papers from ResearchGate : Nature News & Comment

“Millions of articles might soon disappear from ResearchGate, the world’s largest scholarly social network. Last week, five publishers said they had formed a coalition that would start ordering ResearchGate to remove research articles from its site because they breach publishers’ copyright. A spokesperson for the group said that up to 7 million papers could be affected, and that a first batch of take-down notices, for around 100,000 articles, would be sent out “imminently”. 

Meanwhile, coalition members Elsevier and the American Chemical Society have filed a lawsuit to try to prevent copyrighted material appearing on ResearchGate in future. The complaint, which has not been made public, was filed on 6 October in a regional court in Germany. (ResearchGate is based in Berlin). It makes a “symbolic request for damages” but its goal is to change the site’s behaviour, a spokesperson says….”

Major publishers sue ResearchGate over copyright infringement

“Two journal publishers have launched legal proceedings in the United States against academic-networking site ResearchGate for copyright infringement.

Elsevier and the American Chemical Society (ACS) say that the ResearchGate website violates US copyright law by making articles in their journals freely available. The two publishers filed the claim with the United States District Court for the District of Maryland on 2 October….”

Publishers accuse ResearchGate of mass copyright infringement

“ResearchGate, a popular for-profit academic social network that makes it easy to find and download research papers, is facing increasing pressure from publishers to change the way it operates.

On Tuesday, the American Chemical Society and Elsevier, two large academic publishers, launched a second legal battle against the Berlin-based social networking site — this time not in Europe, but in the U.S.

The publishers accuse ResearchGate of “massive infringement of peer-reviewed, published journal articles.” They say that the networking site is illegally obtaining and distributing research papers protected by copyright law. They also suggest that the site is deliberately tricking researchers into uploading protected content. A spokesperson for ResearchGate declined to comment on the accusations.

The court documents, obtained by Inside Higher Ed from the U.S. District Court in Maryland, include an “illustrative” but “not exhaustive list” of 3,143 research articles the publishers say were shared by ResearchGate in breach of copyright protections. The publishers suggest they could be entitled to up to $150,000 for each infringed work — a possible total of more than $470 million….”