Free Tamil Ebooks: For Android, iOS, Kindle and PDF readers.

From Google’s English: “All the latest books in Tamil are not available to us as ebooks. ProjectMadurai.com is working on a noble service for publishing ebooks in Tamil. All the Tamil ebooks that the group has provided so far are on PublicDomain. But these are very old books.

No recent books are available here….

Recently, various writers and bloggers have started writing about the latest events in Tamil. They fall under a range of topics such as literature, sports, culture, food, cinema, politics, photography, commerce and information technology.

We are going to put them all together to create Tamil ebooks.

The ebooks created will be released under the Creative Commons license. By publishing this book, the rights of the author who wrote the book are legally protected. At the same time, you can give those ebooks free of charge to whoever wants them.

So readers who read Tamil can get the latest Tamil eBooks for free….”

A Benedictine monk is helping to save ancient manuscripts in Syria and Iraq–Aleteia

“Meanwhile, in Iraq, a Dominican priest, Najeeb Michaeel (in photo, center, with Fr. Stewart at left), had already established a center for digitization of Christian manuscripts in the Christian village of Qaraqosh. HMML helped him digitize thousands of Syriac, Arabic, and Armenian manuscripts. In 2014, after the Islamic State group took over Mosul, Michaeel (who is now the Chaldean Archbishop of Mosul) took the precaution of moving the precious manuscripts out of Qaraqosh, even though it was not expected that ISIS would move eastward of Mosul. But they did.

Along with the gruesome treatment ISIS meted out to “infidels” and the destruction it incurred upon places like the Mosul Museum and the ancient city of Palmyra, they also destroyed major manuscript collections in Mosul, “leaving behind only the digital images and a handful of severely damaged volumes,” Fr. Stewart said. “Most collections outside of Mosul, however, had been saved: moved at the last minute, or successfully concealed. This was the case at Mar Behnam Monastery, where some 500 manuscripts were hidden behind a false wall and never discovered during the two-year occupation of the monastery by ISIS. When the monks returned to their now wrecked and defaced monastery, where ISIS had blown up the shrines of the saints to whom the monastery was dedicated, they found the manuscripts intact, safe in their hiding place, a still-beating heart in the battered and bruised body of the cloister.”

Today, HMML has a growing digitized collection of more than 250,000 handwritten books and 50 million handwritten pages. The work is vitally important to helping scholars gain a deeper understanding of ancient cultures, Fr. Stewart said….”

Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles | Everybody’s Libraries

“As I’ve noted here previously, there’s a wealth of serial content published in the 20th century that’s in the public domain, but not yet freely available online, often due to uncertainty about its copyright (and the resulting hesitation to digitize it).  Thanks to IMLS-supported work we did at Penn, we’ve produced a complete inventory of serials from the first half of the 20th century that still have active copyright renewals associated with them. And I’ve noted that there was far more serial material without active copyright, as late as the 1960s or even later.  We’ve also produced a guide to determining whether particular serial content you may be interested in is in the public domain.

Now that we’ve spent a lot of time surveying what is still in copyright though, it’s worth turning more focused attention to serial content that isn’t in copyright, but still of interest to researchers.  One way we can identify journals whose older issues (sometimes known as their “deep backfiles”) are still of interest to researchers and libraries is to see which ones are included in packages that are sold or licensed to libraries.   Major vendors of online journals publish spreadsheets of their backfile offerings, keyed by ISSN.  And now, thanks to an increasing amount of serial information in Wikidata (including links to our serials knowledge base) it’s possible to systematically construct inventories of serials in these packages that include, or might include, public domain and other openly accessible content….”

Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data | Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress announced today that it has been awarded a $1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) project, which will pilot ways to combine cutting edge technology and the collections of the largest library in the world, to support digital research at scale….

Since 1993, the Library of Congress has invested heavily in digitizing collections and making them available online for everyone to use.  Today, the Library’s digital collections comprise a treasure trove of data whose research potential is only beginning to be realized. LC Labs — the Library’s digital innovation team — is now looking forward to how the Library, and other cultural heritage institutions, can free huge digital collections for modern computational research. …”

 

Library Receives $1M Mellon Grant to Experiment with Digital Collections as Big Data | Library of Congress

“The Library of Congress announced today that it has been awarded a $1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud (CCHC) project, which will pilot ways to combine cutting edge technology and the collections of the largest library in the world, to support digital research at scale….

Since 1993, the Library of Congress has invested heavily in digitizing collections and making them available online for everyone to use.  Today, the Library’s digital collections comprise a treasure trove of data whose research potential is only beginning to be realized. LC Labs — the Library’s digital innovation team — is now looking forward to how the Library, and other cultural heritage institutions, can free huge digital collections for modern computational research. …”

 

Digital Scores and Libretti – CURIOSity Digital Collections

“The Loeb Music Library digitizes scores and libretti selected for their rare or unique natures and their popularity as objects of research and teaching.

By providing online access to these items, the library makes primary source materials available for use at Harvard and around the world.

This digital collection includes manuscripts, first editions, and early editions of music from the 17th to the early 20th century. Many items, such as variant editions and annotated proofs of 19th-century operas and related libretti, are meant to be seen and used together. As a group, they give scholars a window into the study of historical performance practice….”

Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain – VICE

“A coalition of archivists, activists, and libraries are working overtime to make it easier to identify the many books that are secretly in the public domain, digitize them, and make them freely available online to everyone. The people behind the effort are now hoping to upload these books to the Internet Archive, one of the largest digital archives on the internet.

As it currently stands, all books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain, meaning they’re publicly owned and can be freely used and copied. Books published in 1964 and after are still in copyright, and by law will be for 95 years from their publication date.

But a copyright loophole means that up to 75 percent of books published between 1923 to 1964 are secretly in the public domain, meaning they are free to read and copy. The problem is determining which books these are, due to archaic copyright registration systems and convoluted and shifting copyright law….”