Coherent Digital Announces Policy Commons to Launch in June 2020

“Toby Green, former Head of Publishing, OECD and now co-founder, Coherent Digital: “It took 60 years for scientific consensus on the dangers of asbestos to change public health policy. It’s been 120 years since researchers gave early warning about the climate, yet policy makers are only just beginning to take action. One of the reasons for the long delay between expert consensus and policy action is because most content from experts in IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers is published informally. This makes discovery hard, cataloguing impossible and preservation a nightmare. Students struggle to learn, too. In reading lists and syllabi, we’ve found that 25% of links to documents are broken. We intend to fix these problems with Policy Commons.”

Policy Commons will be an open platform that makes it easy to find, catalog and preserve reports, working papers, policy briefs and data from a directory of over 5,000 IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers. It will be a comprehensive service that covers born-digital and archival material from IGOs like the OECD, the UN, the World Bank, IMF, FAO and EU, as well as leading NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and smaller influential think tanks.

Anyone will be able to use Policy Commons to find the content they need – full text access will be offered via the original website, if still available. Subscribing institutions will be able to access preservation copies, exclusive content, and benefit from a full range of support services, including catalog data and usage tracking….”

Coherent Digital Announces Policy Commons to Launch in June 2020

“Toby Green, former Head of Publishing, OECD and now co-founder, Coherent Digital: “It took 60 years for scientific consensus on the dangers of asbestos to change public health policy. It’s been 120 years since researchers gave early warning about the climate, yet policy makers are only just beginning to take action. One of the reasons for the long delay between expert consensus and policy action is because most content from experts in IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers is published informally. This makes discovery hard, cataloguing impossible and preservation a nightmare. Students struggle to learn, too. In reading lists and syllabi, we’ve found that 25% of links to documents are broken. We intend to fix these problems with Policy Commons.”

Policy Commons will be an open platform that makes it easy to find, catalog and preserve reports, working papers, policy briefs and data from a directory of over 5,000 IGOs, NGOs, think tanks and research centers. It will be a comprehensive service that covers born-digital and archival material from IGOs like the OECD, the UN, the World Bank, IMF, FAO and EU, as well as leading NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and smaller influential think tanks.

Anyone will be able to use Policy Commons to find the content they need – full text access will be offered via the original website, if still available. Subscribing institutions will be able to access preservation copies, exclusive content, and benefit from a full range of support services, including catalog data and usage tracking….”

A community-maintained standard library of population genetic models | bioRxiv

Abstract:  The explosion in population genomic data demands ever more complex modes of analysis, and increasingly these analyses depend on sophisticated simulations. Recent advances in population genetic simulation have made it possible to simulate large and complex models, but specifying such models for a particular simulation engine remains a difficult and error-prone task. Computational genetics researchers currently re-implement simulation models independently, leading to duplication of effort and the possibility for error. Population genetics, as a field, also lacks standard benchmarks by which new tools for inference might be measured. Here we describe a new resource, stdpopsim, that attempts to rectify this situation. Stdpopsim is a community-driven open source project, which provides easy access to a standard catalog of published simulation models from a wide range of organisms and supports multiple simulation engine backends. We share some examples demonstrating how stdpopsim can be used to systematically compare demographic inference methods, and we encourage an even broader community of developers to contribute to this growing resource.

 

 

Big national deals with an open access component – Google Sheets

This spreadsheet displays information on consortial “big deal” agreements with an open access component.

The information is collected from webpages of the consortium websites, as could be found online.

In addition, some general information about publisher sizes is also displayed, as found on the SciLit website and information about self archving allowances from the Sherpa/RoMEO website.

The Project Jengo Saga: How Cloudflare Stood up to a Patent Troll – and Won!

“After we were sued by Blackbird, we decided that we wouldn’t roll over. We decided we would do our best to turn the incentive structure on its head and make patent trolls think twice before attempting to take advantage of the system. We created Project Jengo in an effort to remove this economic asymmetry from the litigation. In our initial blog post we suggested we could level the playing field by: (i) defending ourselves vigorously against the patent lawsuit instead of rolling over and paying a licensing fee or settling, (ii) funding awards for crowdsourced prior art that could be used to invalidate any of Blackbird’s patents, not just the one asserted against Cloudflare, and (iii) asking the relevant bar associations to investigate what we considered to be Blackbird’s violations of the rules of professional conduct for attorneys….”

The inspiring story of how Cloudflare defeated a patent troll and broke the patent-trolling business-model / Boing Boing

“In 2016, Cloudflare was targeted by a notorious patent troll called Blackbird Technologies; rather than capitulate, the company set up a fund called “Project Jengo” to pay bounties to researchers who documented prior art that could be used to invalidate the patent in question — and all of Blackbird’s patents, and began to file to have additional patents invalidated based on that crowdsourced research.

 

Not only did Cloudflare prevail in its litigation, it also seems to have taken a serious bite out of Blackbird, whose headcount has dropped precipitously, along with the number of lawsuits the company has filed. And to add insult to injury, the Cloudflare filed ethics complaints against the company’s founder (who are both lawyers) with their individual bar associations….”

OpenGLAM

“The OpenGLAM initiative is currently working on a modern set of principles and values on Open Access for Cultural Heritage. We expect to draft a Declaration that outlines the rationales behind open access policy adoptions, acknowledges different cultural backgrounds, and addresses ethical and privacy considerations to help promote the adoption of open policies by a broader set of organizations around the world.

By February 2020 we will release a green paper focusing on the legal foundations of open access for cultural heritage, and examining some of the broader questions around copyright and open licensing, traditional knowledge, ethical and privacy concerns, and technical standards for open access. Following a consultation period, we plan to publish a final version of that paper and make the official launch of the Declaration on Open Access for Cultural Heritage by 2020. If you would like to get involved, please write to us at info [at] openglam.org….”

Cambridge to trial crowdfunding open access book | Research Information

“Cambridge University Press (CUP) is launching a crowdfunding campaign to publish a book under the open access model.

CUP has teamed up with the book site Unbound to determine whether crowdfunding can support making selected titles open access – free to read online by anyone with an internet connection, anywhere in the world.

The move is a first for both partners – for CUP it’s the first time it has tried to crowdfund a book, while for Unbound it is the first time the company has worked with an academic publisher….”

Cambridge to trial crowdfunding open access book | Research Information

“Cambridge University Press (CUP) is launching a crowdfunding campaign to publish a book under the open access model.

CUP has teamed up with the book site Unbound to determine whether crowdfunding can support making selected titles open access – free to read online by anyone with an internet connection, anywhere in the world.

The move is a first for both partners – for CUP it’s the first time it has tried to crowdfund a book, while for Unbound it is the first time the company has worked with an academic publisher….”