Foundations for Open Scholarship Strategy Development

“This document aims to agree on a broad, international strategy for the implementation of open scholarship that meets the needs of different national and regional communities but works globally.

Scholarly research can be an inspirational process for advancing our collective knowledge to the benefit of all humankind. However, current research practices often struggle with a range of tensions and conflicts as it adapts to a largely digital system. What is broadly termed as Open Scholarship is an attempt to realign modern research practices with this ideal. We do not propose a definition of Open Scholarship, but recognise that it is a holistic term that encompasses many disciplines, practices, and principles, sometimes also referred to as Open Science or Open Research. We choose the term Open Scholarship to be more inclusive of these other terms.

The purpose of this document is to provide a concise analysis of where the global Open Scholarship movement currently stands: what the common threads and strengths are, where the greatest opportunities and challenges lie, and how we can more effectively work together as a global community to recognise the top strategic priorities. This document was inspired by the Foundations for OER Strategy Developmentand work in the FORCE11 Scholarly Commons Working Group, and developed by an open contribution working group.

Our hope is that this document will serve as a foundational resource for continuing discussions and initiatives about implementing effective strategies to help streamline the integration of Open Scholarship practices into a modern, digital research culture. Through this, we hope to extend the reach and impact of Open Scholarship into a global context, making sure that it is truly open for all. We also hope that this document will evolve as the conversations around Open Scholarship progress, and help to provide useful insight for both global co-ordination and local action. We believe this is a step forward in making Open Scholarship the norm.

Ultimately, we expect the impact of widespread adoption of Open Scholarship to be diverse. We expect novel research practices to increase the pace of innovation, and therefore stimulate critical industries around the world. We could also expect to see an increase in public trust of science, as transparency becomes more normative. As such, we expect interest in Open Scholarship to increase at multiple levels, due to its inherent influence on society and global economics….”

What Open means in the face of inequity & inequality – Google Slides

“It’s not only about getting the licensing right — it’s also about overcoming linguistic barriers, put resources in place, build the technical infrastructures that are flexible enough to adapt to diverse contexts”

Think you have remarkable memory traits? Share them by participating in the Harvard PGP-Lumosity Memory Challenge – Citizen Science Salon : Citizen Science Salon

“In 2005, [George Church] launched the Personal Genome Project (PGP), which collects data on a person’s DNA, environmental background, and relevant health and disease information from consenting participants. The premise of the PGP is grounded in open science, meaning that all this data is publicly available to researchers, who then study the relationship between specific DNA sequences and various displayed traits, like having an especially good memory.

This openness is the hallmark of the PGP, described on their website as “a vision and coalition of projects across the world dedicated to creating public genome, health, and trait data.” The PGP seeks to share data for the “greater good” in ways that have been previously “hampered by traditional research practices.” In other words, by being set up so it’s open-access project that allows individuals to freely share their data with researchers, no single researcher can “control” access to the data. By inviting participants to openly share their own personal data, this project allows individuals to directly impact scientific progress….”

Open Science MOOC

This is a new web site for the Open Science MOOC (previously tagged for OATP at its previous site). 

“This website is aimed to provide information about our MOOC on Open Science principles and practices, its rationale, the current state of the project, and the people behind it.

This project was started in early 2017 after a barcamp at the Open Science Conference in Berlin. Soon, more than 30 people contributed and a first draft was made. Now in late summer 2017, already more than 100 volunteers have agreed to share their knowledge about Open Science and to contribute to what they see as an extremely important issue in nowadays and future science. Concomitantly, the European Commission published its report “Providing researchers with the skills and competencies they need to practise Open Science”, supporting the importance of the topic and thereby the necessity to explain, teach and support researchers to gain the necessary skills.”

OATP introduction – Harvard Open Access Project

“The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) is a crowd-sourced project running on free and open-source software to capture news and comment on open access (OA) to research. It has two missions: (1) create real-time alerts for OA-related developments, and (2) organize knowledge of the field, by tag or subtopic, for easy searching and sharing….”

The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) all-volunteer phase will start later this summer

“To insure that OATP serves the OA community in the future as it has in the past, we invite you to participate as a tagger, and help us recruit other taggers. OATP aims to cover OA comprehensively, and can only do that if it has taggers in every in every ecological niche — by topic, academic field, country, region, and language.”

Openness and Sharing of Agricultural Research Outputs In India – Google Docs

“You are invited to join us in writing this crowd-sourced article. The side-headings are only suggestive and you may add to the list. You may also share this document <https://bit.ly/2JyuAjc> with your colleagues and friends whom you may think can contribute substantially.  Contact: Sridhar Gutam <gutam2000@gmail.com>….”

Connecting Africa to the Knowledge Commons: From Project to Sustainable Infrastructure

“Open access in Africa faces several challenges related to maintain open access digital platforms and how to keep them updated. In most of the cases, public resources are not enough. Also, there is a prevailing challenge on human resources professionalization on publishing practices in the digital environment….

Open access in Africa initiative aims to promote the Open access research in Africa by Africans, and also contributors from all the world. This initiative will collecte information on open access challenges in Africa. The website designed for this initiative will allow to users to have information freely by language, location, and research field….

We need all information and databases on open access lunched in Africa and how Open access can be successfully impacted career of researchers in Africa. Our next priority is to design a website that will allow users from Africa to access freely to databases by location, language, academic discipline, and researcher type….”