What can fact-checkers learn from Wikipedia? We asked the boss of its nonprofit owner – Poynter

“Several studies have shown that Wikipedia is as reliable if not more reliable than more traditional encyclopedias. A 2012 study commissioned by Oxford University and the Wikimedia Foundation, for example, showed that when compared with other encyclopedic entries, Wikipedia articles scored higher overall with respect to accuracy, references and overall judgment when compared with articles from more traditional encyclopedias. Wikipedia articles were also generally seen as being more up-to-date, better-referenced and at least as comprehensive and neutral. This study followed a similar 2005 study from Nature that found Wikipedia articles on science as reliable as their counterparts from Encyclopedia Britannica.”

Open Science Federation | to open science

“The Open Science Federation is a nonprofit alliance working to improve the conduct and communication of science. We are scientists and citizen scientists, writers, journalists, and educators, and makers of and advocates for Open Data, Open Access, and Open Source and Standards.

Get to know us at @openscience on Twitter, or in Google+, and elsewhere, with which we have connected the largest Open Science network in the world. We recently took up a count, deduplicated, and identified over 40,000 people and groups across our social network.

We do not intend to be at the centre of the Open Science community per se, though analyses often place us there….A network can be stronger than any one organization, and a federation of networks, stronger still. Thus we share access to our social media accounts with many individuals and organisations….”

Eprints in Library and Information Science e-LIS: new hosting, items and statistics ! | Agricultural Information Management Standards (AIMS)

“We are pleased to inform you that in May 2017, e-LIS : eprints in Library and Information Science migrated to a new hosting institution –  the Federico II University of Naples (Italy). In 2018 e-LIS will celebrate its 15th anniversary !  Library and information science (LIS) researchers, librarians, students and research institutions are invited to search, browse and participate by depositing their own work in e-LIS !

[…]

Articles (pre- and post-prints), presentations can be in any language (abstracts and keywords should be also in English). Preferred formats are .pdf and .html, best suited for later retrieval.

e-LIS Policies: Check before submitting your papers

How to deposit records in E-LIS. The Subject Tree adopted is JITA Classification Schema.

All works deposited in the E-LIS server remain the property of the author who are responsible for the documents they archive. Authors have to ensure that the intellectual property of their deposited work is theirs and that no restrictions exist for digital distribution of the deposited work. The quality of the metadata of the submission is controlled by country editors.

Items in e-LIS may be browsed by the following:   Author –  Subject – Countries – Year – Conference – Conference by name

Click here for a simple search — Click here for advanced Search 

June 2017 – Open Access Standard Glossary Review – NOW LIVE – Development / Open Access – Forum

“Open access to publications is a key component of the modern research ecosystem, but the international community lacks a clear and unambiguous shared understanding of the key terminology. Several possible inputs exist that could profitably be cross referenced, gaps filled, and any conflicting meanings addressed. This activity identified an initial subset of open access terms that are currently the most problematic and, through a diverse Working Group of international subject experts, developed agreed definitions for an Open Access standard glossary in the CASRAI dictionary.

See this post for background on the Open Review. This review is open until June 30, 2017. The proposed new standard glossary terms are NOW READY for review and can be found listed here:”

Help request paywalled articles about Open Access be made accessible

“We can request this research through the Open Access Button. Teresa and I both requested 20 each. We’d love for you to help us request the rest. It’s easy and you can help make more research accessible to all whether you have time to make 1 or 50 requests!

1: Create an Open Access Button account.  All that is needed is your email (to notify you when the request is fulfilled), but you can also provide your name, position, and/or affiliation (authors are more likely to help actual people).

2. Search  Grab the DOI or title from this spreadsheet and paste it into the search box on the Open Access Button site.

3. Share a story and submit Tell the Button how getting access to the research will help you?—?this will be shared with the author and can be critical in convincing them to archive their research. You can either use the story below that Teresa and I have used, or create your own.

I’m really excited about your research related to Open Access. Unfortunately, it is not accessible to all. Librarians, open access advocates, and researchers could benefit from your article if you make it openly available. Please archive it, so we can all learn from your research!

4. Update the spreadsheet After you submit your request, copy the url and paste it in the “OAB Request Link” field on the spreadsheet.

That’s it! You’re a star!

The Open Access Button’s request system will email the author and request they archive the article to make it accessible to everyone. Thanks for helping make more research open!”

A new game puts the public into public radio archives – Poynter

“[A] new game has launched that not only develops public awareness of public broadcasting archives, but actually deepens the public’s relationship with material in the archive.

The game, called Fix It, was launched by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation. It asks the public for help in identifying and correcting errors in public media transcripts — which improves both the searchability and accessibility of archival material from the collection….”