David Kernohan: Open data is about more than a licence | Wonkhe | Comment

“The release of the “Higher Education Student Statistics: UK, 2016/2017” (Statistical First Release 247) by HESA was accompanied around the sector by a series of sudden sharp intakes of breath in institutional data offices. It represents a brave and bold move into new ways of presenting and sharing data, and showed off a new format that will delight some and disappoint others. In this article I look at what has changed, and why.

The dash for designation. In applying for Designated Data Body status in England, HESA has made a move towards offering “open data”, suggesting that “From 2021 all of our publications will be available in open data format, allowing additional access to the information we enrich.” The Open Data Institute defines open data as “data that anyone can access, use or share,” which sounds like a pretty good thing. In many cases, though, open data has simply meant data that is available under an open (usually Creative Commons) licence – good to have legal clarity, but not at all the same as providing easily usable data.. HESA should be lauded for making this move for SFR248, but it is only a starting point….”

An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) | University of Cambridge, Scholarly Communication

“Description Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions? Would you like to boost citations of your work? Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants? These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Event date:  Thursday, 1 February, 2018 Who is this event for?:  Researchers PhDs PIs

Event link:  An introduction to Open Research (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences)”

The Harvard Crimson :: Opinion :: Access For All

“Our professors do the research. They write the papers and proofread them. They even do the peer review. Then they sign the copyright over to publishers, who don’t pay them a dime—they’re paid by grants and salary, our taxes, and tuition. 

Harvard then pays again for the journals—many of them over $10,000 each—and most of us feel personally the bite each term when we buy our sourcebooks. Many of these cost upwards of $100 not because they’re on paper rather than online (printing costs pennies a page), but because of the fees charged by publishers like Elsevier (1,387 journals ranging across academia) and Wiley (348 journals), some higher than $1 per page. 

That’s three ways we pay for the same research, writing, proofreading, and peer review. Even Harvard has found the cost too high, and has cut down on its subscriptions. …

Students can make several big contributions to this movement. Members of Congress need to hear from their constituents in support of the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA), a bipartisan bill to make taxpayer-funded published research—most scientific work in the U.S.—freely available. Students can explain to their professors why they should publish in open access journals when available, and better yet why the University should establish a freely-available repository for all Harvard researchers’ work. Best of all, seniors can set an example now by making their theses available to the world at www.hcs.harvard.edu/thesis. Each of us can show politicians, faculty members, and present and future colleagues that we value open access to academic research. It’s up to us to say it: Knowledge is for everyone. …”

Harvard College Thesis Repository [now offline]

Welcome to the Harvard College Thesis Repository, a project of Harvard College Free Culture! Here Harvard students make their senior theses accessible to the world, for the advancement of scholarship and the widening of open access to academic research. Too many academics still permit publishers to restrict access to their work, needlessly limiting—cutting in half, or worse—readership, research impact, and research productivity. For more background, check out our op-ed article in The Harvard Crimson. If you’ve written a thesis in Harvard College, you’re invited to take a step toward open access right here, by uploading your thesis for the world to read. (If you’re heading for an academic career, this can even be a purely selfish move—a first taste of the greater readership and greater impact that comes with open access.)

Theses For All | Opinion | The Harvard Crimson

“The creation of a website [Harvard College Thesis Repository] to save all senior theses —created by Harvard College Free Culture, a student group— should be welcomed as a great addition to the campus and Harvard’s ever-widening and expanding academic community. Currently, the Harvard University Archives only saves certain theses depending on the honors grade that they receive, and theses that receive the cutoff grade and above are accessible through the Archives’ inconvenient closed-stack system. 

The Free Thesis Project provides researchers much easier access to all of Harvard’s senior theses, if students choose to put them on the site….”

A Call for Open Access and Empathy Is Not Enough: Hands on Are Needed!: The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol 17, No 10

Abstract:  Chattopadhyay and colleagues (2017) call for inclusive access to bioethics journals and global participation in the bioethics discourse. They argue that the understanding of global bioethics may be misleading. If only people from one (small) part of the world publish in bioethics journals, global bioethics is not representative. We absolutely support their call to develop the field of bioethics by reducing journal payment-barriers and emphasizing empirical ethics, analysis, and theoretical perspectives from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). But, based on our experiences from research, teaching, and capacity building in bioethics in Ethiopia, we find that access alone has less impact when not reinforced by close collaborations between high- and low-income colleagues and essential capacity building in bioethics among students, clinicians, and academic staff in the LMIC.

Open Education Leadership Program – SPARC

“SPARC is currently piloting the SPARC Open Education Leadership program during the 2017-2018 academic year. The pilot began on October 2nd with a cohort of 14 fellows selected from SPARC member libraries. Pilot fellows participate both as students and creators, helping to evaluate and improve the curriculum along the way. Fellows who successfully complete the pilot will receive a certificate and the title of SPARC Open Education Leadership Fellow, and will be credited as contributors to the program’s development. …”

Student programming volunteers assist an #openaccess project.

“Student programmers are donating programming time to a major #openaccess initiative (https://unglue.it) as a senior capstone project:

“Two teams of Computer Science students from Stevens Institute of Technology are working with us on Free Ebook Foundation projects. One team of five is working to renovate the http://Unglue.it user experience. As their senior-year capstone project, they’ll be implementing a responsive web framework that will make http://Unglue.it easy to use on mobile phones, tablets, and on desktops….”

(I’m quoting an email update from Unglue.it. Unfortunately I can’t find the same update online, or I’d link to it here.)

Someone should start a web site to match OA projects in need of development support with student programmers (or more generally, any programmers) willing to donate their time. If no one else can arrange it, I’ll do it. If people or projects in either category send me their names and contact info, I’ll post them to a wiki page as a makeshift until someone can devise a better way to match them up.”

Raising awareness for Wikipedia in Nigeria – Wikimedia Blog

“With an estimated 190 million residents, Nigeria is the largest country in Africa. A remarkable 60% of Nigerians are school-aged, creating one of the largest student bodies in the world. With internet access in Nigeria quickly growing, local Wikimedians are working together to raise awareness for the platform and how Nigeria’s many students can both use and improve Wikipedia.”