Open Online Education Project

“The Open Online Education Project (OOEP) aims to improve online education by:

Developing open-source online educational tools.
Advocating for the publishing of free online education materials
Creating collaborations between institutions to address problems in online education.
Collecting and distributing resources for online education

We are a group of students, faculty, and technologists, growing out of Harvard and MIT, working on online education at the university level. We believe online education naturally lends itself to collaboration and needs further development. OOEP consists of a coalition of projects and partners….”

Mathematics | Free Full-Text | Analysis of Factors Influencing Students’ Access to Mathematics Education in the Form of MOOC

Abstract:  Restricting the movement of students because of COVID-19 requires expanding the offer of online education. Online education should reflect the principles of pedagogical constructivism to ensure the development of students’ cognitive and social competencies. The paper describes the preparatory course of mathematics, realized in the form of MOOC. This course was created and implemented based on the principles of pedagogical constructivism. The analysis of the respondents’ approach to MOOC revealed a difference between bachelor and master students in the use of MOOC. Bachelors found a strong correlation between their approach to MOOCs and the way they are educated in secondary schools. The results of the research point to the need of more emphasis should be placed on advancing the learner’s skills in navigating and analysing information. The questionnaire filled in by the participants also monitored the students’ access to learning. The results of the experiment confirmed the connection between the preferred approach to learning and students’ activities within the MOOC. 

 

Mathematics | Free Full-Text | Analysis of Factors Influencing Students’ Access to Mathematics Education in the Form of MOOC

Abstract:  Restricting the movement of students because of COVID-19 requires expanding the offer of online education. Online education should reflect the principles of pedagogical constructivism to ensure the development of students’ cognitive and social competencies. The paper describes the preparatory course of mathematics, realized in the form of MOOC. This course was created and implemented based on the principles of pedagogical constructivism. The analysis of the respondents’ approach to MOOC revealed a difference between bachelor and master students in the use of MOOC. Bachelors found a strong correlation between their approach to MOOCs and the way they are educated in secondary schools. The results of the research point to the need of more emphasis should be placed on advancing the learner’s skills in navigating and analysing information. The questionnaire filled in by the participants also monitored the students’ access to learning. The results of the experiment confirmed the connection between the preferred approach to learning and students’ activities within the MOOC. 

 

Two-Part Webinar: By Faculty and For Students and Open Access Monographs | NISO website

“By Faculty and For Students: Supporting Open Educational Resources, Part One:

How do participating players — whether the librarian or the member of the faculty — successfully drive buy-in by the target audience, the undergraduates? What is important to consider in terms of design that engages students/ What indicators of use are deemed valuable? Some texts may not lend themselves to being printed out. In some instances, the subject matter may dictate appropriate design (interactive? Text only? Images?). The creation of low-cost textbooks and curriculum support is recognized as important, but, moving forward, how is the community dealing with the challenges of ensuring currency and quality? How does the community ensure access for all users who may not have access to the same technology? What support might be made available to faculty interested in developing these materials?

Open Access Monographs: What You Need To Know, Part Two:

A 2019 article in The Atlantic observed that the current disruption in scholarly book publishing might result in the Great Sorting, what the author saw as a beneficial “matching of different kinds of scholarly uses with the right media, formats and locations.” In this specific arena, who are the stakeholders currently delivering open access monographs? What are the current business models that represent sustainability for those stakeholders? Recognizing that the population of interested readers of these works may be far larger than the actual revenues derived, how can both publishing professionals as well as librarians assist users in discovering such high-value OA monographs?…”

Open Pedagogy Approaches – Simple Book Publishing

“Many of us who work with Open Pedagogy today have come into the conversations not only through an interest in the historical arc of the scholarship of teaching and learning, but also by way of Open Education, and specifically, by way of Open Educational Resources (OERs). OERs are educational materials that are openly-licensed, usually with Creative Commons licenses, and therefore they are generally characterized by the 5 Rs: they can be reused, retained, redistributed, revised, and remixed. As conversations about teaching and learning developed around the experience of adopting and adapting OERs, the phrase “Open Pedagogy” began to re-emerge, this time crucially inflected with the same “open” that inflects the phrase “open license.”

If we merge OER advocacy with the kinds of pedagogical approaches that focus on collaboration, connection, diversity, democracy, and critical assessments of educational tools and structures, we can begin to understand the breadth and power of Open Pedagogy as a guiding praxis. To do this, we need to link these pedagogical investments with the reality of the educational landscape as it now exists. The United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights asserts that “higher education shall be equally accessible to all.” …”

Open access journals: what you should know | The BMJ

“Should open access be the way to publish research? This has been the centre of a great debate between academic publishers, scientists, funding organisations, and governments (including, more recently, Donald Trump).1 Publishing research is important for many in medicine, particularly those who are aiming for competitive specialties or who want to have academia as part of their career. From medical students applying to the foundation programme to consultants applying for jobs, all are rewarded for having their work published. This reflects the integral part that research plays in medicine—we owe to research much of our medical knowledge. With research, we continue to expand this knowledge, with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. Participating in the research process also develops fundamental skills, such as teamwork and interpersonal relationships, which are transferable to clinical practice….”

PsyArXiv Preprints | Easing Into Open Science: A Tutorial for Graduate Students

Abstract:  This article provides a roadmap to assist graduate students to engage in open science practices. We suggest eight open science practices that novice graduate students could begin adopting today. The topics we cover include journal clubs, project workflow, preprints, reproducible code, data sharing, transparent writing, preregistration, and registered reports.

 

Supporting Students: OER and Textbook Affordability Initiatives at a Mid-Sized University

“In 2018 the Alabama Commission on Higher Education kicked off a statewide program to increase awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) at colleges and universities. Spurred by the efforts of ACHE, the University of North Alabama committed to OER and textbook affordability programs and included OER adoption as a key aspiration in their 2019-2024 strategic plan “Roaring with Excellence”. With support from the president and provost of the university, Collier Library adopted strategic purchasing initiatives, including database purchases to support specific courses as well as purchasing reserve copies of textbooks for high-enrollment, required classes. In addition, the scholarly communications librarian became a founding member of the OER workgroup on campus. This group’s mission is to direct efforts for increasing faculty awareness and adoption of OER. This presentation will discuss the structure of the each of these programs from initial idea to implementation. Included will be discussions of assessment of faculty and student awareness, development of an OER grant program, starting a textbook purchasing program, promotion of efforts, funding, and future goals.”