Towards societal impact through open research | Springer Nature | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Open research is fundamentally changing the way that researchers communicate and collaborate to advance the pace and quality of discovery. New and dynamic open research-driven workflows are emerging, thus increasing the findability, accessibility, and reusability of results. Distribution channels are changing too, enabling others — from patients to businesses, to teachers and policy makers — to increasingly benefit from new and critical insights. This in turn has dramatically increased the societal impact of open research. But what remains less clear is the exact nature and scope of this wider impact as well as the societal relevance of the underpinning research….”

 

Gold Open Access research has greater societal impact as used more outside of academia | Corporate Affairs Homepage | Springer Nature

“What impact does open research have on society and progressing global societal challenges?  The latest results of research carried out between Springer Nature, the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) and the Dutch University Libraries and the National Library consortium (UKB), illustrates a substantial advantage for content published via the Gold OA route where research is immediately and freely accessible.

Since the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were launched in 2015, researchers, their funders and other collaborative partnerships have sought to explore the impact and contribution of open research on SDG development. However – until now – it has been challenging to map, and therefore identify, emerging trends and best practice for the research and wider community. Through a bibliometric analysis of nearly 360,000 documents published in 2017 and a survey of nearly 6,000 readers on Springer Nature websites, the new white paper, Open for All, Exploring the Reach of Open Access Content to Non-Academic Audiences shows not only the effects of content being published OA but more importantly who that research is reaching.”

DECLARATION TO IMPROVE BIOMEDICAL & HEALTH RESEARCH

“We are an international group of researchers and patients who believe that:

it is ethically untenable to remain complicit in the crises that undermine science,

there are simple measures which can improve the quality and openness, and

the public and patients have a right to full access of the research they fund….”

India’s plan to pay journal subscription fees for all its citizen may end up making science harder to access

“India, the world’s second-most populous country, is planning to make scholarly literature available for everyone under its latest science, technology and innovation policy.

The policy will push for the whole country to have a nationwide subscription to replace existing subscriptions paid by different research and education institutions to access research journals. The Indian government is in talks with the world’s top scientific publications, including one of the biggest scholarly publishers, Elsevier, to create the system.

If it works, India will become the largest country to give access to paywalled journal articles to more than 1.3 billion of its citizens….

Both India and Germany’s cases are two clear examples of deliberate ignorance pursuing short term narrow options of prestigious conformity to the oligopoly of commercial publishers over value to society….”

India’s plan to pay journal subscription fees for all its citizen may end up making science harder to access

“India, the world’s second-most populous country, is planning to make scholarly literature available for everyone under its latest science, technology and innovation policy.

The policy will push for the whole country to have a nationwide subscription to replace existing subscriptions paid by different research and education institutions to access research journals. The Indian government is in talks with the world’s top scientific publications, including one of the biggest scholarly publishers, Elsevier, to create the system.

If it works, India will become the largest country to give access to paywalled journal articles to more than 1.3 billion of its citizens….

Both India and Germany’s cases are two clear examples of deliberate ignorance pursuing short term narrow options of prestigious conformity to the oligopoly of commercial publishers over value to society….”

“From Campus to Community: Making the Case for Open Access by Bringing ” by Rachel Caldwell, Melanie A. Allen et al.

“Summary: Describes how librarians developed a workshop for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) to help NPOs access peer-reviewed publications behind paywalls, develop skills in searching (information retrieval), and improve awareness of how academic libraries can support community organizations. NPOs who participated gave feedback in a number of ways, from written surveys to short recorded video interviews. With permission, their feedback was used to develop promotional and informational materials intended for the campus about the value of open access to those working in the local community.”

 

 

“From Campus to Community: Making the Case for Open Access by Bringing ” by Rachel Caldwell, Melanie A. Allen et al.

“Summary: Describes how librarians developed a workshop for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) to help NPOs access peer-reviewed publications behind paywalls, develop skills in searching (information retrieval), and improve awareness of how academic libraries can support community organizations. NPOs who participated gave feedback in a number of ways, from written surveys to short recorded video interviews. With permission, their feedback was used to develop promotional and informational materials intended for the campus about the value of open access to those working in the local community.”

 

 

Research Publishing: Is ‘One Nation, One Subscription’ Pragmatic Reform for India? – The Wire Science

“The story of open access (OA) publishing in India has been a chequered one. While we have had some progress with institutional initiatives, the landscape remains fractured without a national OA mandate. And now some reports suggest that the Indian government is considering striking a ‘one nation, one subscription’ deal with scholarly publishers for access to paywalled research for all of India’s citizens. Only last year, India had decided against joining Plan S. K. VijayRaghavan has been at the helm of these decisions, as the principal scientific advisor to the Government of India….

While it is heartening to see the momentum towards settling on a suitable OA approach, the ‘one nation, one subscription’ scheme is a curious proposition for India. A consortium of Indian science academies had recommended it last year. The scheme entails the Government of India to negotiate for and purchase a single, unified subscription from a consortium of publishers of scientific books and journals, after which the books and papers will be available to all government-funded institutions as well as all tax-payers….

Around the world, this scheme has been implemented in Uruguay and Egypt, while some European countries have adopted versions of it. Experts around the world have suggested that the model could be a feasible interim solution for developing countries. Note that both Egypt and Uruguay obtained financial assistance from the World Bank to secure their deals….”

Govt recommends ‘one nation-one subscription’ plan for scientific journals | India News – Times of India

“The Union ministry of science and technology has recommended a ‘one nation-one subscription policy for scientific journals that would allow all universities, research institutions and even individuals in India access to published papers that often have prohibitive costs. The proposal is part of its upcoming Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, 2020 (STIP)….”

Why Do Medical Journals Exist in the 21st Century?: Some Thoughts on the Next 5 Years of JACC: Basic to Translational Science – ScienceDirect

“However, with the current trends toward depositing new scientific work on pre-print servers, the proliferation of opportunistic for-profit open access journals, and the dizzying array of social media platforms that provide information in real time, I believe that it will be increasingly hard for journals to be all things to all people all of the time. However, that does not mean we should not lean in….

Accordingly, there is still a need today for a medical journal that is completely dedicated to bringing the fruits of fundamental scientific discoveries to patients….”